To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Swanson School of Engineering

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Swanson School of Engineering
TypePublic
Established1846
DeanJames R. Martin II
Academic staff
170 (tenure and non-tenure)[1]
Undergraduates2,984[2]
Postgraduates882[2]
Location, ,
US
CampusOakland
Endowment$197.2 million (market value)[3]
Websitewww.engineering.pitt.edu
Pitt Swanson School of Engineering 2014 Wordmark.jpg

The Swanson School of Engineering is the engineering school of the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1846, The Swanson School of Engineering is the second or third oldest in the United States.[4]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/5
    Views:
    5 072
    1 400
    910
    584
    955
  • ✪ Day In the Life of a Pitt Engineer
  • ✪ University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Investing Now Program
  • ✪ University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering EXCEL Program
  • ✪ Senior Recognition Night 2016 Live - Swanson School of Engineering
  • ✪ Swanson School of Engineering- Day in the Life

Transcription

Contents

History

Benedum Hall and the Engineering Auditorium (in the foreground) is the primary home of the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.
Benedum Hall and the Engineering Auditorium (in the foreground) is the primary home of the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

The Swanson School of Engineering evolved out of the Western University of Pennsylvania, the former name of the University of Pittsburgh, offering specialized engineering subjects to students, although they were still required complete their classical requirements. The first graduates in these engineering subjects were Isaac Morley and J. B. Stilly in 1846.[5] Separate degree programs in mechanical and civil engineering were announced in 1868, and four year degrees resulting in separate engineering degrees were first implemented in 1870.[6] The school was the university's response to the years surrounding the Civil War that transformed Pittsburgh's industrial base from regional to international.

Degrees in civil engineering and mechanical engineering were offered beginning in 1868. mining engineering was added in 1869 and Electrical Engineering in 1890. In 1909, the metallurgical engineering department was established, followed by the chemical engineering department and the world's first petroleum engineering department in 1910, with its first degree conferred in 1915.[7] The undergraduate cooperative education program was also initiated that year. The industrial engineering department was established in 1921 and the safety engineering program in 1930.[8] The bioengineering department was added in 1998.[9]

In 2007 the school was renamed to the Swanson School of Engineering after John A. Swanson, founder of the computer software firm ANSYS, donated $41.3 million to the school.[10]

Academics

The Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation is attached to Benedum Hall
The Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation is attached to Benedum Hall

The Swanson School of Engineering offers undergraduate, graduate degrees, and doctorates in 6 academic departments:

Academic programs offered by the school included Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, Civil Engineering, Mining Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Science, Industrial Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

Research centers housed in the school include:

  • The Center for Energy
  • The Center for Research Computing
  • The Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation
  • The Petersen Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering
  • The Lubrizol Innovation Laboratory (a partnership of the Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department and Lubrizol)[11]

Center for Energy

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Energy is a research center housed in the Swanson School of Engineering that is dedicated to improving energy technology development and energy sustainability.[12] Comprising more than 70 faculty members and 200 students and postdocs, the center was scheduled to be housed on a floor of Benedum Hall undergoing a $15 million renovation.[13] The center was created in 2008 to bring together energy innovators across a range of engineering and academic disciplines. It also sought to develop stronger collaborations with energy industry partners in the Western Pennsylvania.[14] The center's faculty focus on five key areas of research that include energy delivery and reliability, carbon management and utilization, high-temperature and other advanced materials, energy efficiency, and unconventional gas resources.[15]

Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation

In 2003, through funding from Jack Mascaro, the Heinz Endowments, and the George Bevier Estate, the Swanson School of Engineering established the Mascaro Sustainability Initiative, resulting in the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation (MCSI).[16]

Deans

The Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering is the home of the Swanson School's Department of Bioengineering
The Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering is the home of the Swanson School's Department of Bioengineering

Ten individuals have served in the position of the Dean of the School of Engineering over its history.

Deans of the Swanson School of Engineering[17]
Years Dean
1882–1908 Daniel Carhart
1910–1927 Frederick L. Bishop
1927–1950 Elmer A. Holbrook
1951–1963 G. Raymond Fitterer
1965–1973 Harold E. Hoelscher
1973–1985 Max L. Williams
1986–1993 Charles A. Sorber
1994–1996 H.K. Chang
1996–2018 Gerald D. Holder
August 2018- James Martin

Current Department Chairs

Notable alumni and faculty

Reginald Fessenden helped to pioneer wireless communications while at Pitt
Reginald Fessenden helped to pioneer wireless communications while at Pitt

See also

References

  1. ^ "Swanson School of Engineering 2016 statistical summary by PITT | SWANSON School of Engineering". issuu. February 14, 2017. p. 104. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Swanson School of Engineering 2016 statistical summary by PITT | SWANSON School of Engineering". issuu. February 14, 2017. p. 82. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  3. ^ "Swanson School of Engineering 2016 statistical summary by PITT | SWANSON School of Engineering". issuu. February 14, 2017. p. 274. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  4. ^ Alberts, Robert C. (1986). Pitt :the story of the University of Pittsburgh, 1787-1987. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press. p. 403. ISBN 0-8229-1150-7. Retrieved August 12, 2010.
  5. ^ Starrett, Agnes Lynch (1937). "Schools of Engineering and Mines". Through One Hundred and Fifty Years: The University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press. p. 309. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  6. ^ Starrett, Agnes Lynch (1937). "Schools of Engineering and Mines". Through One Hundred and Fifty Years: The University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 310–311. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  7. ^ "Petroleum Engineering". Britannica. Retrieved February 3, 2012.
  8. ^ "71 TO STUDY SAFETY". news.google.com. Google News Archive Search. The Pittsburgh Press. October 19, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  9. ^ "SSOE - History". Pitt Swanson Engineering.
  10. ^ Templeton, David (December 6, 2007). "Pitt engineering school renamed for alumnus giving $41.3 million". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  11. ^ Joe Miksch (August 12, 2014). "Pitt Engineering Develops Strategic Alliance With Lubrizol | University of Pittsburgh News". News.pitt.edu. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  12. ^ "Center for Energy: About Us". University of Pittsburgh. 2010. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  13. ^ "The Center for Energy's Future Home". University of Pittsburgh. 2010. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  14. ^ Smit, Deb (March 2, 2011). "Pitt's Center for Energy shines spotlight on sector; Alstom Grid of France moves in". Pop City. Issue Media Group, LLC. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  15. ^ Daniel, Bates (October 17, 2011). "Bullish on Energy: Pitt Center for Energy at Forefront of Critical, Specific Energy Challenges". Pitt Chronicle. University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved February 10, 2012.
  16. ^ Robert Hill (October 9, 2003). "Pitt School of Engineering Announces Creation of New Sustainability Initiative | University of Pittsburgh News". News.pitt.edu. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  17. ^ Swanson School of Engineering Statistical Summary For the 2010 Academic Year. University of Pittsburgh. 2010. p. 4. Retrieved October 11, 2011.
  18. ^ "Sanjeev Shroff". Swanson School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  19. ^ "Steven Little". Swanson School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  20. ^ "Radisav Vidic". Swanson School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  21. ^ "Alan George". Swason School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  22. ^ "Bopaya Bidanda". Swanson School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  23. ^ "Brian Gleeson". Swanson School of Engineering. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  24. ^ "Dr. Wanda M. Austin Biography". NASA. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  25. ^ Ryan, Harriet (August 2, 2018). "USC names retired aerospace executive Wanda Austin as acting president, announces Nikias' departure". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  26. ^ "A True Inspiration, Professor John Choma, In Memoriam". USC - Viterbi School of Engineering. August 22, 2014. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  27. ^ "John Choma, Jr. Obituary - San Dimas, California - Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries - Covina Hills FD 1150". Forestlawn.tributes.com. Retrieved June 24, 2017.

Further reading

Fitterer, George Raymond; Palucka, Tim (2004). A history of the University of Pittsburgh School of Engineering 1846-2004. Pittsburgh, PA: Cathedral Publishing. ISBN 1-887969-13-6.

External links

This page was last edited on 11 December 2019, at 13:08
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.