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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Suteans were a possibly Semitic people[citation needed][1] who lived throughout the Levant and Canaan c. 1350 BC, and later also lived in Babylonia. They are mentioned in eight of the 382 Amarna letters. Like the Habiru, they traditionally worked as mercenaries, and were sometimes called Ahlamu. They are listed in documents from the Middle Assyrian Empire (1395-1075 BC) as being extant in the Assyrian colony city of Emar, in what is now north east Syria. Together with other Semitic peoples; the Chaldeans and Arameans, they overran swaths of Babylonia c. 1100 BC. They were eventually conquered by Assyria, along with the rest of Babylonia.[2][3][page needed]

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Transcription

Amarna letters

One letter mentioning the Suteans is entitled "Waiting for the Pharaoh's words", from Biryawaza of Dimasqu-(Damascus) to pharaoh:

I am indeed, together with my troops and chariots, together with my brothers, my 'Apiru and my Suteans, at the disposition of the archers, wheresoever the king, my lord, shall order (me to go).[4]

This usage is somewhat atypical of the usage of Habiru and external mercenary forces in the Amarna letters, since this letter quotes them as being necessary and beneficial to the efforts of Biryawaza.

The Sutean language appears to have been Semitic.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Letters to the King of Mari: A New Translation, with Historical Introduction, Notes, and Commentary" p.26="A closer look at Sutean names shows a small percentage of non-Akkadian and non-Amorite names that nevertheless belong to a Semitic language, presumably Sutean."
  2. ^ "A Companion to the Ancient Near East - Google Książki".
  3. ^ George Roux. Ancient Iraq. ISBN 978-0140125238.
  4. ^ EA 195 (EA for el Amarna), lines 24-32. From Moran, William L. The Amarna Letters. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987, 1992. (softcover, ISBN 0-8018-6715-0)
  5. ^ Heimpel, Wolfgang (2003). Letters to the King of Mari: A New Translation, with Historical Introduction, Notes, and Commentary. p. 26 "A closer look at Sutean names shows a small percentage of non-Akkadian and non-Amorite names that nevertheless belong to a Semitic language, presumably Sutean."
This page was last edited on 24 March 2020, at 15:06
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