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Supreme Director of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Supreme Director of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata (Spanish: Director Supremo de las Provincias Unidas del Río de la Plata) was a title given to the executive officers of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata according to the form of government established in 1814 by the Asamblea del Año XIII (Assembly of Year XIII). The supreme director was to wield power for a term of two years.

The assembly hoped to confront the royalists, who had been emboldened by internal dissension within the patriotic faction. To prevent abuses of power, the directorship would be combined with a state council of nine members and would be required to answer to a congress empowered to carry out legislation.

After the resignation of José Rondeau following the unitarian defeat at the Battle of Cepeda,[1] the office of Supreme Director was briefly assumed by Juan Pedro Aguirre. He endorsed the Buenos Aires Cabildo to name a governor for the province of Buenos Aires as the national congress dissolved itself on 16 February 1820, effectively ending the centralism in the national government and giving way to a new federal reorganization for the country, which was immediately formalized by the Treaty of Pilar on 23 February 1820.

For the traditional liberal historiography, exemplified by Bartolomé Mitre's works, the aftermath of the dissolution of the centralist government led to the Anarquía del año 20 (Anarchy of the 1820s). Until 1826 there would not be any central authority among the provinces of Argentina.

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Transcription

List of Supreme Directors

Took office Left office Supreme Director Ref.
January 31, 1814 January 15, 1815
Posadas.jpg
Gervasio Antonio de Posadas [2]
January 15, 1815 April 15, 1815
CarlosAlvearcolor.jpg
Carlos María de Alvear [3]
April 18, 1815 April 20, 1815
Viamonte.jpg
Juan José Viamonte [4]
April 20, 1815 April 20, 1815
Jose Rondeau 2.jpg
José Rondeau [5]
April 20, 1815 April 17, 1816
Alvarez thomas.jpg
Ignacio Álvarez Thomas [6]
April 17, 1816 July 12, 1816
Antonio González Balcarce.jpg
Antonio González de Balcarce [7]
May 3, 1816 June 9, 1819
Juan Martin de Pueyrredon por Villar.jpg
Juan Martín de Pueyrredón [8]
June 9, 1819 February 11, 1820
Jose Rondeau 2.jpg
José Rondeau [9]
February 11, 1820 February 16, 1820
Juan Pedro Aguirre.jpg
Juan Pedro Aguirre [10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Tras la batalla de Cepeda, José Rondeau renuncia y desaparece el directorio.
  2. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Gervasio Antonio Posadas 31 de enero de 1814 – 15 de enero de 1815
  3. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Carlos María de Alvear 15 de enero de 1815 – 15 de abril de 1815
  4. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Juan José Viamonte 18 de abril de 1815 – 20 de abril de 1815
  5. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. José Rondeau 20 de abril de 1815
  6. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Ignacio Álvarez Thomas 20 de abril de 1815 – 17 de abril de 1816
  7. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Antonio González Balcarce 17 de abril de 1816 – 12 de julio de 1816
  8. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Juan Martín de Pueyrredón 3 de mayo de 1816 – 9 de junio de 1819
  9. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. José Rondeau 9 de junio de 1819 – 11 de febrero de 1820
  10. ^ "Presidentes y ministros de Argentina (1776 - 2011)" [Presidents and ministers of Argentina (1776 - 2011)]. El Historiador (in Spanish). Buenos Aires. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011. Juan Pedro Aguirre 11 de febrero de 1820 – 16 de febrero de 1820
This page was last edited on 18 December 2020, at 04:42
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