To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Substance intoxication

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Substance intoxication
Classification and external resources
Specialty psychiatry
ICD-10 F10.0-F19.0
ICD-9-CM 305
MeSH D011041

Substance intoxication is a type of substance use disorder[1] which is potentially maladaptive and impairing, but reversible,[2] and associated with recent use of a substance.[3]

If the symptoms are severe, the term "substance intoxication delirium" may be used.[4] Slang terms include: getting high (generic) or being stoned or blazed (usually in reference to cannabis[citation needed]), with many more specific slang terms for each particular type of intoxicant. Alcohol intoxication is even graded in intensity from buzzed, to tipsy, all the way up to hammered, smashed, fucked up, wasted, destroyed, and a number of other terms.

Classification

Examples (and ICD-10 code) include:

Contact high

The term contact high is sometimes used to describe intoxication without direct administration, either by second-hand smoke (as with cannabis), or by placebo in the presence of others who are intoxicated.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Substance intoxication" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  2. ^ Michael B. First; Allen Frances; Harold Alan Pincus (2004). DSM-IV-TR guidebook. American Psychiatric Pub. pp. 135–. ISBN 978-1-58562-068-5. Retrieved 27 April 2010. 
  3. ^ Michael B. First; Allan Tasman (2 October 2009). Clinical Guide to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders. John Wiley and Sons. pp. 146–. ISBN 978-0-470-74520-5. Retrieved 27 April 2010. 
  4. ^ William H. Reid; Michael G. Wise (26 August 1995). DSM-IV training guide. Psychology Press. pp. 80–. ISBN 978-0-87630-768-7. Retrieved 27 April 2010. 
This page was last edited on 13 July 2018, at 23:14
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.