To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Stutton railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stutton
Station House, Stutton.jpg
The old station house at Stutton, now a private home
Location
PlaceStutton, North Yorkshire
AreaSelby
Coordinates53°52′08″N 1°16′22″W / 53.8690°N 1.2729°W / 53.8690; -1.2729
Grid referenceSE4790941666
Operations
Original companyYork and North Midland Railway to 1854
Pre-groupingNorth Eastern Railway 1854-1923
Post-groupingLondon and North Eastern Railway 1923-1948, British Railways (N.E region) 1948 to closure
Platforms2
History
1847Opened
1905Closed to passengers
1964Closed
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

Stutton railway station was a railway station in Stutton, North Yorkshire, on the Harrogate to Church Fenton Line. The station opened on 10 August 1847 and closed to passenger traffic on 30 June 1905.[1] It remained open to goods traffic until it closed completely on 6 July 1964.[2]

The two-storey brick and sandstone station building was designed by George Townsend Andrews in the form of two side-by-side railway cottages. It was built on the up platform and is now used as a private residence. The roof of its single-storey northern extension was extended as a narrow canopy over the platform. The goods yard consisted only of one siding and a headshunt and had a cattle dock. A wooden signal box stood at the northern end of the station next to the level crossing with Weedling Gate. It was pulled down towards the end of the 1960s. Since the village that was served by the station was rather small, and Tadcaster station very close, passenger numbers remained low, causing the early closure to regular passenger services. Only chartered holiday trains occasionally called at Stutton afterwards.[2]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/1
    Views:
    4 029
  • ✪ Ghost Stations - Disused Railway Stations in North Yorkshire, England

Transcription

Lines

Preceding station   Disused railways   Following station
Church Fenton   North Eastern Railway
Harrogate to Church Fenton Line
  Tadcaster
Line closed; station closed

References

  1. ^ Rogers. J. (2000). The railways of Harrogate and district. Manchester: North East Railway Association.
  2. ^ a b Nick Catford (28 July 2017). "Stutton". disused-stations.org.uk.


This page was last edited on 18 May 2020, at 18:12
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.