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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Logo of Stoewer in 1939.
Logo of Stoewer in 1939.
Stoewer Sewing Machine from about 1912.
Stoewer Sewing Machine from about 1912.
Stoewer LT 4 1910
Stoewer LT 4 1910

Stoewer was a German automobile manufacturer before World War II whose headquarters were in Stettin (Now Szczecin, Poland).

The first company was founded by the Stoewer brothers, Emil (lived 1873 - 1942) and Bernhard (1875 - 1937) in 1896 for manufacturing sewing machines in Stettin.

In 1899, the Stoewer brothers founded the firm Gebrüder Stoewer, Fabrik für Motorfahrzeugen and started to produce automobiles. Their first automobile was the Großer Stoewer Motorwagen, with 6.5 hp (4.8 kW) and 17 km/h (11 mph) maximum speed.

Stoewer Sedina 1937-1940
Stoewer Sedina 1937-1940

In 1908 Stoewers constructed Stoewer G4. This model was successful for them at the time - 1070 cars were built. In 1910, Stoewer cars were built under licence by Mathis of Strassburg. In 1916, the family-owned company was transformed into a limited company under the name of Stoewer-Werke AG, vormals Gebrüder Stoewer.

In the mid-20s a new class of cars was introduced: the D-Types included D3, D9 and D10 with four-cylinder engines, as well as D5, D6 and D12 with six cylinders. Something special was the 1921 D7 with a proprietary six-cylinder aero engine with 120 hp (89 kW). Of the fifty "D10" made, the only survivor is in Melbourne, Australia in original condition. It was on display at the 2014 MotorClassica.

Hood ornament depicting the griffin of Pomerania.
Hood ornament depicting the griffin of Pomerania.
World War II Stoewer R200 (light off-road car, 1940–1943)
World War II Stoewer R200 (light off-road car, 1940–1943)
Stoewer Arkona Limousine, built in 1940
Stoewer Arkona Limousine, built in 1940

In 1928 the company started to build S8 and G14 models with eight-cylinder engines. At the beginning of the 1930s Stoewers delivered their highlights: G15 Gigant, M12 Marschall and P20 Repräsentant, each with eight-cylinder engines, with 60 to 120 hp (45 to 90 kW) and 130 km/h (81 mph) maximum speed.[1] The production of these cars had to be cancelled after 2,500 vehicles being produced due to worldwide economic troubles. In 1931 Stoewer constructed one of the first cars with front-wheel drive at all, class V5 25 hp (19 kW), 80 km/h (50 mph) maximum speed. The model named Greif Junior was built under the licence of Tatra.[2] Its successor V8 Greif was the last car constructed by Mr Stoewer himself; class Arkona and Sedina were the last civilian cars produced by the company.

In 1936 the Stoewer factory developed the 'uniform light off-road car' (le.E.Pkw, leichter geländegängiger Einheits-PKW) for the German army, a versatile four-wheel drive car,[2] initially (until 1940) equipped with four-wheel steering. Due to capacity-limitations, the cars also had to be produced by BMW-Factory Eisenach, as BMW 325, and by Hanomag in Hanover as the Type 20 B.[2] Together the three manufacturers made a total of ca. 13.000 units. Stoewer was one of several German companies that exploited slave labour during WW II and had its own camp for prisoners.[3] After World War II, the Red Army seized the remaining production facilities, dismantled the factory and sent the equipment to the Soviet Union. The company subsequently ceased to exist.

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Transcription

Passenger car models

Type Construction period Cylinder Capacity Power Vmax
10 PS 1901–1902 straight-2 1.527 cc 18 PS (13,2 kW) 50 km/h (31 mph)
8/14 PS 1902–1905 straight-2 1.527 cc 14 PS (10,3 kW) 50 km/h (31 mph)
20 PS (15 kW; 20 hp) 1904–1905 straight-4 7.946 cc 45 PS (33 kW) 85 km/h (53 mph)
P4 (11/22 PS) 1905–1910 straight-4. 3.054 cc 22 PS (16,2 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
P2 (9/12 PS) 1906–1907 straight-2 2.281 cc 16 PS (11,8 kW) 55 km/h (34 mph)
P4-1 (24/36 PS) 1906–1910 straight-4 5.880 cc 40 PS (29 kW) 80 km/h (50 mph)
P6 (34/60 PS) 1906–1911 straight-6 8.820 cc 60 PS (44 kW) 95 km/h (59 mph)
G4 (6/12 PS) 1907–1911 straight-4 1.500 cc 12 PS (8,8 kW) 60 km/h (37 mph)
PK4 (11/20 PS) 1909–1912 straight-4 2.544 cc 20 PS (14,7 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
C1 (6/18 PS) 1909–1915 straight-4 1.546 cc 18 PS (13,2 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
B1 (6/16 PS) 1910–1912 straight-4 1.556 cc 16 PS (11,8 kW) 65 km/h (40 mph)
B6 (9/22 PS) 1912–1914 straight-4 4.900 cc 45 PS (33 kW) 95 km/h (59 mph)
C2 (10/28 PS) 1913–1914 straight-4 2.412 cc 28 PS (20,6 kW) 75 km/h (47 mph)
C5 (6/18 PS) 1915–1919 straight-4 1.546 cc 15 PS (11 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
D2 (6/18 PS) 1919–1920 straight-4 1.593 cc 18 PS (13,2 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
D6 (19/55 PS) 1919–1921 straight-6 4.960 cc 55 PS (40 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
D7 (42/120 PS) 1919–1921 straight-6 11.160 cc 120 PS (88 kW) 160 km/h (99 mph)
D3 (8/24 PS) 1920–1923 straight-4 2.120 cc 24 PS (17,6 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
D5 (12/36 PS) 1920–1923 straight-6 3.107 cc 36 PS (26,5 kW) 80 km/h (50 mph)
D9 (8/32 PS) 1923–1924 straight-4 2.290 cc 32 PS (23,5 kW) 90 km/h (56 mph)
D12 (12/45 PS) 1923–1924 straight-6 3.107 cc 45 PS (33 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
D10 (10/50 PS) 1924–1925 straight-4 2.580 cc 50 PS (37 kW) 120 km/h (75 mph)
D9V (9/32 PS) 1925–1927 straight-4 2.290 cc 32 PS (23,5 kW) 90 km/h (56 mph)
D12V (13/55 PS) 1925–1928 straight-6 3.386 cc 55 PS (40 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
F6 (6/30 PS) 1927–1928 straight-4 1.570 cc 30 PS (22 kW) 70 km/h (43 mph)
8 Typ S 8 (8/45 PS) 1928 straight-8 1.999 cc 45 PS (33 kW) 85 km/h (53 mph)
8 Typ G 14 (14/70 PS) 1928 straight-8 3.633 cc 70 PS (51 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
8 Typ S 10 (10/50 PS) 1928–1930 straight-8 2.464 cc 50 PS (37 kW) 90 km/h (56 mph)
Gigant G 15 K (15/80 PS) 1928–1933 straight-8 3.974 cc 80 PS (59 kW) 110 km/h (68 mph)
Gigant G 15 (15/80 PS) 1928–1933 straight-8 3.974 cc 80 PS (59 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
Repräsentant P 20 (20/100 PS) 1930–1933 straight-8 4.906 cc 100 PS (74 kW) 120 km/h (75 mph)
Marschall M 12 (12/60 PS) 1930–1934 straight-8 2.963 cc 60 PS (44 kW) 90 km/h (56 mph)
V 5 1931–1932 V4 1.168 cc 25 PS (18,4 kW) 80 km/h (50 mph)
V 5 Sport 1931–1932 V4 1.168 cc 30 PS (22 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
R 140 1932–1933 straight-4 1.355 cc 30 PS (22 kW) 85 km/h (53 mph)–105 km/h (65 mph)
R 140 1933–1934 straight-4 1.466 cc 30 PS (22 kW) 85 km/h (53 mph)–105 km/h (65 mph)
R 150 1934–1935 straight-4 1.466 cc 35 PS (25,7 kW) 90–110 km/h
Greif V8 1934–1937 V8 2.489 cc 55 PS (40 kW) 110 km/h (68 mph)
R 180 1935 straight-4 1.769 cc 45 PS (33 kW) 105 km/h (65 mph)
Greif V8 Sport 1935–1937 V8 2.489 cc 57 PS (42 kW) 120 km/h (75 mph)
Greif Junior 1936–1939 flat-4 1.484 cc 34 PS (25 kW) 100 km/h (62 mph)
Sedina 1937–1940 straight-4 2.406 cc 55 PS (40 kW) 110 km/h (68 mph)
Arkona 1937–1940 straight-6 3.610 cc 80 PS (59 kW) 120 km/h (75 mph)–140 km/h (87 mph)

References

  1. ^ Apral, K. "Stoewer 1930". www.classiccarcatalogue.com. Retrieved 10 July 2013.
  2. ^ a b c Odin, L.C. World in Motion 1939, The whole of the year's automobile production. Belvedere Publishing, 2015. ASIN: B00ZLN91ZG.
  3. ^ Pomorze Zachodnie na przełomie dwu epok, 1944-1946 Kazimierz Golczewski Wydawn. Poznańskie,page 29, 1964

External links

This page was last edited on 9 September 2021, at 22:18
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