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Stockton South (UK Parliament constituency)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stockton South
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Stockton South in Cleveland
Outline map
Location of Cleveland within England
CountyCounty Durham, North Yorkshire
Electorate74,698 (2018)[1]
Major settlementsStockton-on-Tees, Thornaby-on-Tees, Yarm, Ingleby Barwick and Eaglescliffe
Current constituency
Created1983
Member of ParliamentMatt Vickers (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created fromStockton-on-Tees, Thornaby, Easington and Richmond (Yorks)[2]

Stockton South is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since December 2019 by Matt Vickers, a Conservative MP.[n 2]

Boundaries

1983–1997: The Borough of Stockton-on-Tees wards of Bishopsgarth, Egglescliffe, Fairfield, Grangefield, Hartburn, Ingleby Barwick, Mandale, Parkfield, Preston, Stainsby, Victoria, Village, and Yarm, and the Borough of Middlesbrough wards of Ayresome, Brookfield, and Kader.

1997–2010: The Borough of Stockton-on-Tees wards of Bishopsgarth, Egglescliffe, Elm Tree, Fairfield, Grangefield, Hartburn, Ingleby Barwick, Mandale, Parkfield, Preston, Stainsby, Victoria, Village, and Yarm. The three Middlesbrough wards were transferred to the redrawn Middlesbrough constituency.

2010–present: The Borough of Stockton-on-Tees wards of Bishopsgarth and Elm Tree, Eaglescliffe, Fairfield, Grangefield, Hartburn, Ingleby Barwick East, Ingleby Barwick West, Mandale and Victoria, Parkfield and Oxbridge, Stainsby Hill, Thornaby-on-Tees, and Yarm.

Stockton South consists of the south-western half of Stockton-on-Tees and on the same bank, upstream, the town of Eaglescliffe – on the southern bank of the River Tees are the towns of Thornaby-on-Tees, Yarm, and Ingleby Barwick.

History

The seat was formed from a combination of Stockton-on-Tees and Thornaby in 1983, predominantly as a replacement to the latter seat.

Political history

More middle-class than neighbouring Stockton North, this seat was first won by the SDP-Liberal Alliance in a narrow victory at the 1983. Ian Wrigglesworth, the former Labour MP for Thornaby, defected to the newly-formed Social Democratic Party in 1981, and held the successor seat as the SDP candidate.

This result came after the Conservative candidate's nomination was withdrawn when he was revealed to have previously been in the National Front.

Following this, the seat was held by a Conservative for ten years, from 1987 to 1997. It was a bellwether in Labour's landslide at the 1997 general election, and its member, Dari Taylor, retained it until the 2010 general election, when the Conservative, James Wharton narrowly won back the seat.

It was the Conservative Party's only gain in the North East, with Wharton substantially increasing his majority at the 2015 general election. However, Labour's victory in the seat in 2017 saw the seat's 30 year status as a bellwether constituency come to an end. In 2019, the Conservatives took it back, in line with the general swing in their favour in multiple north-east Red wall seats.

Constituency profile

Based on ONS data, workless claimants and registered jobseekers, were in May 2017 lower than the North East average of 5.9%[3] and also lower than the national average of 4.6%, at 3.4%[4] of the population.

Members of Parliament

Election Member[5] Party
1983 Ian Wrigglesworth SDP
1987 Tim Devlin Conservative
1997 Dari Taylor Labour
2010 James Wharton Conservative
2017 Paul Williams Labour
2019 Matt Vickers Conservative

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

On 11 December 2019, the day before the election, the Liberal Democrat candidate Brendan Devlin endorsed the Labour candidate Paul Williams, urging people to vote tactically to stop the Conservatives winning the seat.[6] However, Devlin still appeared on the ballot paper and therefore received votes.

General election 2019: Stockton South[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Matt Vickers 27,764 50.7 Increase 3.9
Labour Paul Williams 22,504 41.1 Decrease 7.4
Liberal Democrats Brendan Devlin 2,338 4.3 Increase 2.5
Brexit Party John Prescott 2,196 4.0 New
Majority 5,260 9.6 N/A
Turnout 54,802 71.3 Increase 0.1
Conservative gain from Labour Swing Increase 5.6
General election 2017: Stockton South
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Paul Williams[8] 26,102 48.5 Increase 11.5
Conservative James Wharton 25,214 46.8 Steady
UKIP David Outterside[9] 1,186 2.2 Decrease 8.4
Liberal Democrats Drew Durning 951 1.8 Decrease 0.8
Green Jo Fitzgerald 371 0.7 Decrease 1.1
Majority 888 1.7 N/A
Turnout 53,824 71.2 Increase 2.2
Labour gain from Conservative Swing Increase 5.8
General election 2015: Stockton South[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Wharton 24,221 46.8 Increase 7.8
Labour Louise Baldock 19,175 37.0 Decrease 1.3
UKIP Ted Strike 5,480 10.6 Increase 7.7
Liberal Democrats Drew Durning 1,366 2.6 Decrease 12.5
Green Jacqui Lovell 952 1.8 New
Independent Steve Walmsley 603 1.2 New
Majority 5,046 9.8 Increase 9.2
Turnout 51,797 69.0 Increase 1.6
Conservative hold Swing Increase 4.55
General election 2010: Stockton South[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Wharton 19,577 38.9 +4.7
Labour Dari Taylor 19,245 38.3 −9.4
Liberal Democrats Jacquie Bell 7,600 15.1 −1.0
BNP Neil Sinclair 1,553 3.1 New
UKIP Peter Braney 1,471 2.9 +0.9
Independent Yvonne Hossack 536 1.1 New
Christian Ted Strike 302 0.6 New
Majority 332 0.6 N/A
Turnout 50,284 67.4 +4.4
Conservative gain from Labour Swing −7.0

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Stockton South[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Dari Taylor 21,480 47.8 −5.2
Conservative James Gaddas 15,341 34.1 +1.7
Liberal Democrats Mike Barker 7,171 16.0 +2.4
UKIP Sandra Allison 931 2.1 New
Majority 6,139 13.7 -6.9
Turnout 44,923 63.0 +0.1
Labour hold Swing −3.5
General election 2001: Stockton South[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Dari Taylor 23,414 53.0 −3.3
Conservative Tim Devlin 14,328 32.4 −1.3
Liberal Democrats Suzanne Fletcher 6,012 13.6 +4.4
Socialist Alliance Lawrence Coombes 455 1.0 New
Majority 9,086 20.6 -2.0
Turnout 44,209 62.9 −11.6
Labour hold Swing −0.8

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Stockton South[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Dari Taylor 28,790 56.3 +16.5
Conservative Tim Devlin 17,205 33.7 −11.5
Liberal Democrats Peter Monck 4,721 9.2 −5.8
Referendum John Horner 400 0.8 New
Majority 11,585 22.6 N/A
Turnout 51,116 74.5 -8.3
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +14.0
General election 1992: Stockton South[16][17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Devlin 28,418 45.2 +10.2
Labour John McKie Scott 25,049 39.8 +8.5
Liberal Democrats Kay R. Kirkham 9,410 15.0 −18.7
Majority 3,369 5.4 +4.1
Turnout 62,877 82.8 +3.8
Conservative hold Swing +0.8

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Stockton South[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Tim Devlin 20,833 35.0 −1.6
SDP Ian Wrigglesworth 20,059 33.7 −3.1
Labour John McKie Scott 18,600 31.3 +5.0
Majority 774 1.3 N/A
Turnout 59,492 79.0 +6.9
Conservative gain from SDP Swing
General election 1983: Stockton South[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
SDP Ian Wrigglesworth 19,550 36.8
Conservative Tom Finnegan 19,448 36.6
Labour Frank Griffiths 13,998 26.3
Independent D. Fern 205 0.4
Majority 102 0.2
Turnout 53,201 72.1
SDP win (new seat)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.

References

  1. ^ "England Parliamentary electorates 2010-2018". Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. ^ "'Stockton South', June 1983 up to May 1997". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Retrieved 14 March 2016.
  3. ^ [1] Office for National Statistics
  4. ^ [2] House of Commons Library
  5. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "S" (part 5)
  6. ^ Woodcock, Andrew (11 December 2019). "Lib Dem candidate endorses Labour rival in his own seat out of 'human dignity and concern for our country'". The Independent. Retrieved 11 December 2019.
  7. ^ "Stockton South Parliamentary constituency". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  8. ^ "Local GP named Labour General Election candidate for Stockton South". BNT Media. 1 May 2017. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  9. ^ "David Outterside Tweet". Twitter. 3 May 2017. Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Stockton South". BBC News. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  12. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  18. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  19. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
This page was last edited on 22 February 2021, at 07:55
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