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Stade Toulousain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stade Toulousain
Logo Stade cerne noir.png
Full nameStade Toulousain
Nickname(s)Le Stade
Les rouge et noir (The reds and black)
Founded1907; 112 years ago (1907)
LocationToulouse, France
Ground(s)Stade Ernest-Wallon (Capacity: 19,500)
PresidentDidier Lacroix
Coach(es)Ugo Mola and Régis Sonnes
Captain(s)Julien Marchand
League(s)Top 14
2018–191st (champions)
1st kit
2nd kit
Official website
www.stadetoulousain.fr

Stade Toulousain (French pronunciation: ​[stad tuluzɛ̃]) (Occitan: Estadi Tolosenc), also referred to as Toulouse, is a French rugby union club from Toulouse in Occitania. Toulouse is one of the most successful clubs in Europe, having won the Heineken Cup a joint record four times – in 1996, 2003, 2005 and 2010. They were also runners-up in 2004 and 2008 against London Wasps and Munster, respectively. Stade Toulousain have also won a record 20 French Championship titles. It is traditionally one of the main providers for the French national team. Their home ground is the Stade Ernest-Wallon. However, big Top 14 matches along with Heineken Cup games are often played at the Stadium Municipal de Toulouse. The club colours are red, black and white.

History

Foundation

Before 1907 rugby in Toulouse was only played in schools or universities. In 1893, students of secondary school "Lycée de Toulouse" got together in "les Sans Soucis". Once attending university the same students founded "l'Olympique Toulousain", which became "Stade Olympien des Etudiants de Toulouse" (SOET) a few years later in 1896. In the same period, 'non-students' grouped in "le Sport Atléthique Toulousain" (SAT) while students of the veterinary school created "l'Union Sportive de l'Ecole Vétérinaire" (USEV). Both entities merged in 1905 and called themselves "Véto-Sport". Finally in 1907, Stade Toulousain was founded resulting from a union between the SOET and Véto-Sport.

Early years

Stade Toulousain played its first final of the national title French Championship in 1909 and lost it to Stade Bordelais Université Club (17–0) in Toulouse. In 1912 Stade Toulousain won its first national title. It had to wait until 1922 before it won its second. However the 1920s were a golden era for the club. Their first final action in the 1920s was in 1921, when they were defeated by USA Perpignan. Despite losing in 1921, the side went on to win the 1922, 1923, 1924, 1926 and 1927 championships.

1930s to 1950s

The following decades were relatively quiet after such a dominant era during the 1920s. Stade Toulousain would not make it to any grand finals during the 1930s, and it would not be until the late 1940s when they would return. However they did contest the Challenge Yves du Manoir with RC Toulon in 1934, though it ended in a nil-all tie and both teams were winners. The club made it to the final of the 1947 championship, and claimed the premiership, beating SU Agen, 10 to 3. However, no such championships followed, the club was again relatively quiet on the championship. It was 22 years in the waiting; Toulouse made it to the final, but were defeated by the CA Bègles club.

1970s to 1980s

In 1971 Toulouse contested the Challenge Yves du Manoir against US Dax, losing 18 to 8. Eleven years after the CA Bègles defeat, the club was again disappointed in the final, being defeated by AS Béziers in the championship game of 1980. The latter end of the decade was however, reminiscent of the 1920s sides. Toulouse were again contesting the Challenge Yves du Manoir for the 1984 season, though they lost to RC Narbonne 17 to 3. They did however claim their first championship since 1947, defeating RC Toulon in the 1985 final. The following season saw them successfully defend their championship, defeating SU Agen in the final. After a number of defeats in the Challenge Yves du Manoir finals, Toulouse defeated US Dax to win the 1988 competition. Both Toulon and Agen won the following premierships (1987 and 1988) but Toulouse won another championship in 1989.

Stade Français vs Stade toulousain which took place in Stade de France, Paris, 27 January 2007
Stade Français vs Stade toulousain which took place in Stade de France, Paris, 27 January 2007
Against the Racing club de France, 1912
Against the Racing club de France, 1912

1990s to present

The dominance continued in the 1990s, starting with a grand final loss in 1991, and a Challenge Yves du Manoir championship in 1993, defeating Castres 13 to 8 in the final. The mid-1990s saw Stade Toulousain become a major force yet again, as the club claimed four premierships in a row, winning the championship in 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997, as well as the Challenge Yves du Manoir in 1995. The club emulated its success in the European Rugby Cup, becoming the first ever champions in the 1995–96 season.

The late 1990s and the 2000s saw the club again reach great heights. The club won the Challenge Yves du Manoir in 1998, defeating Stade Français Paris, and the 1999 championship as well as the 2001 championship and were runners-up in the 2003 season, losing to Stade Français in the final. As the club had done in the mid-1990s, Stade Toulousain replicated this success in the European Rugby Cup, winning the 2002–03 championship and the 2004–05 championship. The club made it to the final of the 2005–06 Top 14, and despite only trailing Biarritz 9–6 at half time, Toulouse could not prevent a second-half whitewash, eventually going down 40–13. They ended their seven-year title drought with a 26–20 win over ASM Clermont Auvergne on 28 June 2008. In 2008 they narrowly lost a Heineken Cup Final to Munster by 3 points. In 2010 Toulouse defeated Leinster to reach the final where they faced Biarritz Olympique at Stade de France in Paris on Saturday 22 May 2010. Toulouse won the game by 21–19 to claim their fourth Heineken Cup title,[1][2] making them the only club to ever win the title four times. Stade Toulousain is also the only French club to have taken part in all the editions of Heineken Cup since its creation (17, with the 2011–12 season). They won the French championship in 2011 against Montpellier (15–10) and 2012 against Toulon (18–12). Stade Toulousain reached the semi-finals of the French championship 20 consecutive years (from 1994 to 2013).

Stadium

Toulouse playing Bath in the 2013 Heineken Cup.
Toulouse playing Bath in the 2013 Heineken Cup.

Toulouse play their home games at the Stade Ernest-Wallon, which was built in the late 1980s and was recently renovated. Stade Toulousain is one of the three teams (all sports included) that own its stadium. It has a capacity of 19,500. The stadium however cannot always accommodate all the fans of the Toulouse club. For the larger fixtures, such as championship or Heineken Cup games or play-offs, the fixture may be moved to Stadium Municipal, which has double capacity, 38,000. The stadium was used for numerous matches at the 2007 Rugby World Cup

Honours

Rugby Union

Football

  • Champions of Midi:
    • Champions: 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914

European record

Toulouse qualified for the Heineken Cup in every season of that competition's existence (1995–96 to 2013–14), and played in the inaugural season of the replacement competition, the European Rugby Champions Cup. The club had the best competition record in the Heineken Cup, having won the competition four times.

Season Competition Games Points Notes
played won drawn lost for against difference
2015–16 European Rugby Champions Cup 6 1 0 5
2014–15 European Rugby Champions Cup 6 4 0 2 126 124 +2 Failed to exit group stages from Pool 4.
2013–14 Heineken Cup 7 5 0 2 166 110 56 Quarter-finalists (lost to Munster)
2012–13 Heineken Cup 6 4 0 2 132 84 48 Second place in Pool 2; parachuted into European Challenge Cup
European Challenge Cup 1 0 0 1 19 30 −11 Quarter-finalists (lost to Perpignan)
2011–12 Heineken Cup 7 4 0 3 164 124 40 Quarter-finalists (lost to Edinburgh)
2010–11 Heineken Cup 8 6 0 2 205 137 68 Semi-finalists (lost to Leinster)
2009–10 Heineken Cup 9 8 0 1 232 143 89 Champions (defeated Biarritz Olympique)
2008–09 Heineken Cup 7 4 1 2 127 97 30 Quarter-finalists (lost to Cardiff Blues)
2007–08 Heineken Cup 9 6 0 3 210 119 91 Runners-up (lost to Munster)
2006–07 Heineken Cup 6 3 0 3 147 145 2 Failed to exit group stages from Pool 5.
2005–06 Heineken Cup 7 5 1 1 223 165 58 Quarter-finalists (lost to Leinster)
2004–05 Heineken Cup 9 8 0 1 263 144 119 Champions (defeated Stade Français)
2003–04 Heineken Cup 9 7 0 2 232 113 119 Runners-up (lost to Wasps)
2002–03 Heineken Cup 9 8 0 1 308 163 145 Champions (defeated Perpignan)
2001–02 Heineken Cup 6 3 0 3 151 146 5 Failed to exit group stages from Pool 6.
2000–01 Heineken Cup 6 2 1 3 171 182 −11 Failed to exit group stages from Pool 3.
1999–00 Heineken Cup 8 6 0 2 256 122 134 Semi-finalists (lost to Munster)
1998–99 Heineken Cup 7 4 0 3 247 118 129 Quarter-finalists (lost to Ulster)
1997–98 Heineken Cup 8 6 1 1 273 153 120 Semi-finalists (lost to Brive)
1996–97 Heineken Cup 6 4 0 2 194 197 −3 Semi-finalists (lost to Leicester Tigers)
1995–96 Heineken Cup 4 4 0 0 123 40 83 Champions (defeated Cardiff)

Current standings

2019–20 Top 14 Table watch · edit · discuss
Club Played Won Drawn Lost Points For Points Against Points Diff. Tries For Tries Against Try Bonus Losing Bonus Points
1 Lyon 10 8 0 2 295 155 140 34 12 3 0 35
2 Bordeaux Bègles 10 7 1 2 298 189 109 33 17 3 1 34
3 Montpellier 10 4 2 4 247 207 40 26 18 2 2 24
4 Toulouse 10 5 0 5 240 209 31 22 18 3 1 24
5 Toulon 10 5 1 4 222 220 2 19 20 1 1 24
6 Clermont 10 6 0 4 240 240 0 22 24 0 0 24
7 La Rochelle 10 5 0 5 199 224 -25 19 22 1 1 22
8 Bayonne 10 5 0 5 210 248 -38 20 27 0 1 21
9 Brive 10 5 0 5 216 254 -38 19 29 1 1 22
10 Pau 10 5 0 5 199 225 -26 20 24 0 1 21
11 Racing 10 3 1 6 225 206 19 24 19 2 3 19
12 Castres 10 4 0 6 245 273 -28 20 25 1 1 18
13 Agen 10 3 1 6 203 235 -32 23 26 0 2 16
14 Stade Français 10 2 0 8 182 336 -154 17 37 0 2 10

If teams are level at any stage, tiebreakers are applied in the following order:

  1. Competition points earned in head-to-head matches
  2. Points difference in head-to-head matches
  3. Try differential in head-to-head matches
  4. Points difference in all matches
  5. Try differential in all matches
  6. Points scored in all matches
  7. Tries scored in all matches
  8. Fewer matches forfeited
  9. Classification in the previous Top 14 season
Green background (rows 1 and 2) receive semi-final play-off places and receive berths in the 2020–21 European Rugby Champions Cup.
Blue background (rows 3 to 6) receive quarter-final play-off places, and receive berths in the Champions Cup.
Plain background indicates teams that earn a place in the 2020–21 European Rugby Challenge Cup.
Pink background (row 13) will qualify to the Relegation play-offs.
Red background (row 14) will automatically be relegated to Rugby Pro D2.

Final table — source: [1]

Current squad

The Toulouse squad for the 2019–20 season is:[3]

Note: Flags indicate national union as has been defined under WR eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-WR nationality.

Player Position Union
Guillaume Marchand Hooker France France
Julien Marchand Hooker France France
Peato Mauvaka Hooker France France
Jaco Visagie Hooker South Africa South Africa
Takeshi Hino Hooker Japan Japan
Dorian Aldegheri Prop France France
Cyril Baille Prop France France
Clément Castets Prop France France
Charlie Faumuina Prop New Zealand New Zealand
Rémi Hugues Prop France France
Rodrigue Neti Prop France France
Paulo Tafili Prop France France
Maks van Dyk Prop South Africa South Africa
Richie Arnold Lock Australia Australia
Rory Arnold Lock Australia Australia
Bastien Chalureau Lock France France
Richie Gray Lock Scotland Scotland
Joe Tekori Lock Samoa Samoa
Florian Verhaeghe Lock France France
François Cros Flanker France France
Rynhardt Elstadt Flanker South Africa South Africa
Louis-Benoit Madaule Flanker France France
Antoine Miquel Flanker France France
Alban Placines Flanker France France
Carl Axtens Number 8 New Zealand New Zealand
Gillian Galan Number 8 France France
Jerome Kaino Number 8 New Zealand New Zealand
Selevasio Tolofua Number 8 France France
Player Position Union
Sébastien Bézy Scrum-half France France
Antoine Dupont Scrum-half France France
Pierre Pagès Scrum-half France France
Zack Holmes Fly-half Australia Australia
Romain Ntamack Fly-half France France
Tristian Tedder Fly-half South Africa South Africa
Pita Ahki Centre New Zealand New Zealand
Théo Belan Centre France France
Pierre Fouyssac Centre France France
Sofiane Guitoune Centre France France
Maxime Mermoz Centre France France
Werner Kok Centre South Africa South Africa
Arthur Bonneval Wing France France
Yoann Huget Wing France France
Cheslin Kolbe Wing South Africa South Africa
Lucas Tauzin Wing France France
Matthis Lebel Fullback France France
Maxime Médard Fullback France France
Thomas Ramos Fullback France France

Selected former coaches

Pierre Villepreux and Jean-Claude Skrela, 1985.
Pierre Villepreux and Jean-Claude Skrela, 1985.

Notable former players

Presidents

  • Henri Cazaux : 1954–57
  • André Brouat : 1964–66
  • Henri Fourès : 1966–73
  • Henri Cazaux : 1974–80
  • Jean Fabre : 1980–89
  • Jean-René Bouscatel : 1992–2017
  • Didier Lacroix : 2017-

Fans

  • Le Huit (fan club of Stade toulousain)
  • Le Huit Section Aveyron
  • Le Rouge et le Noir (formerly Les ultras), the oldest fan club.
  • Le 16e homme
  • Le 16e homme Toulousains 2 Paris (Stade Toulousain's supporters Club at Paris)
  • L'amicale des Supporters
  • Le Virage Toulousain
  • Tolosa XV
  • Les Rouge et Noir de Picardie

See also

References

  1. ^ Cleary, Mick (22 May 2010). "Toulouse lead French revolution with Heineken Cup final win against Biarritz". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 24 May 2010.
  2. ^ "Biarritz 19–21 Toulouse: As it happened". RTÉ Sport. Raidió Teilifís Éireann. 22 May 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2010.
  3. ^ "Staff équipe Pro". Stade Toulousain (in French). Retrieved 6 September 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 18 November 2019, at 17:56
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