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St John's Church, Kidderminster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

St. John's Church, Kidderminster
St John the Baptist Church, Kidderminster - geograph.org.uk - 499492.jpg
The Church of St. John the Baptist, Kidderminster
LocationKidderminster
CountryEngland
DenominationChurch of England
ChurchmanshipModern Catholic
History
DedicationSt John the Baptist
Architecture
Heritage designationGrade II listed
Architect(s)George Alexander
Groundbreaking1842
Completed1843
Administration
ParishKidderminster West Team Ministry
DeaneryKidderminster Deanery
ArchdeaconryArchdeaconry of Dudley
DioceseDiocese of Worcester
Clergy
RectorThe Revd Tim Williams

St. John's Church, Kidderminster is a Church of England parish church in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England. The church is a Grade II listed building.[1]

History

The first St John the Baptist Church was built between 1842 and 1843 to designs by the architect George Alexander. It was known locally as the 'Black Church'. It was created as a parish in 1867 out of that of St Mary and All Saints' Church, Kidderminster.

The present church was rebuilt between 1892 and 1904 by J. A. Chatwin and incorporated the tower and spire of the earlier church, and was consecrated by the Bishop of Worcester Charles Gore on 13 February 1904.

In 1972 offices and vestries were constructed within the nave by Burman Goodall & Partners. The refectory and children's room were added then and the organ was moved to the west end of the nave over the refectory.

Vicars

  • Revd. Melsup Hill 1844 - 1857
  • Revd George Kewley 1858 - 1882
  • Canon John Kershaw 1882 - 1911
  • Revd. R. Stephenson 1911 - 1920
  • Revd. R. Bertie Roberts 1920 - 1936
  • Revd. J.H. Balmforth 1937 - 1943
  • Canon Hugh Roberts 1943 - 1952
  • Revd. Arthur Trippass 1952 - 1960
  • Revd. Anthony Balmforth 1960 - 1966
  • Revd. Alan Doyle 1966 - 1967
  • Revd. Derek Barratt 1967 - 1978
  • Revd. M H Stagg 1978 - 1980
  • Revd. F. Hillebrand 1980 - 1991 (team rector from 1990)
  • Revd. G. Smith 1991 - 2000
  • Revd. H Goddard 2000 - 2009
  • Revd. D. Arnold 2009 - 2014

Fr. Tim Williams 2015-present

Organ

The organ dates from 1909 by Nicholson and Co of Worcester. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[2]

The organist for 66 years from 1877 to 1943 was William Edward Wadely.

References

  1. ^ The Buildings of England : Worcestershire: Nikolaus Pevsner.
  2. ^ "The National Pipe Organ Register". Npor.org.uk. Retrieved 12 August 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

This page was last edited on 21 March 2020, at 00:17
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