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Southern League All-Star Game

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Southern League All-Star Game
FrequencyAnnual
Location(s)Varies (see prose)
InauguratedJuly 13, 1964
(Rickwood Field, Birmingham, Alabama, United States)
Most recentJune 18, 2019
(MGM Park, Biloxi, Mississippi, United States)
Previous eventJune 19, 2018
(Regions Field, Birmingham, Alabama, United States)
Next event2021
(TBD)
ParticipantsSouthern League minor league baseball players
Organized bySouthern League
WebsiteOfficial website

The Southern League All-Star Game is an annual baseball game sanctioned by Minor League Baseball between professional players from the teams of the Double-A Southern League. Each division, North and South, fields a team composed of players in their respective divisions as voted on by the managers, general managers, and broadcasters from each of the league's eight clubs.

From the first All-Star Game in 1964 through 1998, the event predominantly consisted of a single team of the league's All-Stars versus a Major League Baseball team. The division versus division format has been used since 1999. No game was held from 1991 to 1995 as the Southern League and the other two Double-A leagues, the Eastern League and Texas League, participated in the Double-A All-Star Game instead.

Traditionally, the game has taken place during the three-day All-Star break between the first and second halves of the season.[1] The game is meant to mark the halfway-point in the season with the first 70 games being played before and the remaining 70 after.[1] Some additional events, such as the Home Run Derby and All-Star Fan Fest take place each year during this break in the regular season.[2]

History

The first Southern League All-Star Game was played in 1964 at Rickwood Field in Birmingham, Alabama. In the inaugural game, held in the league's first season of operation, the hosting Birmingham Barons served as the competition for a team of Southern League All-Stars as they held first place at a predetermined point in the season.[3] Through 1998, the game usually pitted an All-Star team versus a Major League Baseball (MLB) team, sometimes the host's major league affiliate. The Atlanta Braves participated in 12 All-Star Games, the most among MLB teams. The Minnesota Twins, Houston Astros, Toronto Blue Jays, Chicago Cubs, and Seattle Mariners also competed in one game each.[4]

Other arrangements were also utilized. On seven occasions, a Southern League team, usually the league's leader at a given point before the game, was selected to compete against the All-Stars. These were the Birmingham Barons, Columbus Confederate Yankees, Mobile A's, Montgomery Rebels, Memphis Chicks, Nashville Sounds, and Mobile BayBears. In such instances, players from the rival team who were voted onto All-Star teams played for their own clubs, or the league prohibited voting for players on the host team and chose to recognize all players on those teams as All-Stars.[5] Triple-A teams twice served as the All-Stars' opponents: in 1986 against Nashville, which had moved to the American Association, and in 1987 versus the International League's Richmond Braves. In 1990, one team was made up of All-Stars from American League affiliates and the other of National League affiliates.[4]

A division versus division format, where each division fields a team composed of players in their respective divisions, was used intermittently—first in 1975 and again in 1984 and 1988. This format was readopted in 1999 and has been utilized each year since. From 1999 to 2004, it was East against West. Since realignment in 2005, it has been North versus South.[4]

No game was held from 1991 to 1995 as the Southern League and the other two Double-A leagues, the Eastern League and Texas League, participated in the Double-A All-Star Game instead.[6] The Southern League continued to participate in the Double-A All-Star Game through its final contention in 2002 but resumed holding its own All-Star Game in 1996.[4][7]

Structure

Each division's roster consists of 25 players,[8] as voted on by the managers, general managers, and broadcasters from each of the league's eight clubs.[9] The actual number of players on gameday may be less due to call-ups, injuries, or players choosing not to participate.[10] Nonparticipants retain their All-Star status.[10] The game itself consists of a single nine-inning game to determine a champion. The division in which the host city competes is considered the home team for the game and the other team is designated the visiting team. Designated hitters bat in place of the pitchers.

Historically, players wore their respective team's uniforms. Typically, players on the home team wore their club's white home uniforms, while players on the away team wore their club's gray road uniforms. This changed in 2019 when players wore division-specific jerseys paired with the appropriate home/road pants and their respective team's cap.[11]

Results

Date Winning team Score Losing team City Ballpark Host team Attendance Ref(s).
July 13, 1964 Birmingham Barons 7–2 Southern League Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham Barons 7,264 [12]
July 19, 1965 Columbus Confederate Yankees 4–3 Southern League Columbus, Georgia Golden Park Columbus Confederate Yankees 4,091 [13]
August 8, 1966 Mobile A's 6–1 Southern League Mobile, Alabama Hartwell Field Mobile A's 3,406 [14]
June 26, 1967 Southern League 5–0 Atlanta Braves Charlotte, North Carolina Calvin Griffith Park Charlotte Hornets 6,554 [15]
June 24, 1968 Southern League
Atlanta Braves
[a] Savannah, Georgia Grayson Stadium Savannah Senators [16]
July 19, 1969 Southern League 7–1 (5 inn.)[b] Atlanta Braves Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham A's 13,905 [17]
August 17, 1970 Atlanta Braves 3–1 Southern League Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham A's 6,615 [18]
July 8, 1971 Atlanta Braves 5–3 Southern League Jacksonville, Florida Wolfson Park Jacksonville Suns 6,412 [19]
July 14, 1972 Southern League 7–6 Montgomery Rebels Montgomery, Alabama Paterson Field Montgomery Rebels 2,586 [20]
June 14, 1973 Southern League
Atlanta Braves
2–2 (5 inn.)[c] Savannah, Georgia Grayson Stadium Savannah Braves 6,000 [21]
August 13, 1974[d] Southern League 3–1 Minnesota Twins Jacksonville, Florida Wolfson Park Jacksonville Suns 2,423 [23]
July 24, 1975 East Division 3–1 West Division Savannah, Georgia Grayson Stadium Savannah Braves 2,800 [24]
May 27, 1976 Atlanta Braves 6–1 Southern League Charlotte, North Carolina Calvin Griffith Park Charlotte O's 4,207 [25]
July 7, 1977 Southern League 6–4 Atlanta Braves Chattanooga, Tennessee Engel Stadium Chattanooga Lookouts 8,000 [26]
July 13, 1978 Atlanta Braves 5–1 Southern League Savannah, Georgia Grayson Stadium Savannah Braves 5,283 [27]
July 12, 1979 Southern League 5–2 Atlanta Braves Nashville, Tennessee Herschel Greer Stadium Nashville Sounds 11,079 [28]
June 23, 1980 Southern League
Atlanta Braves
[e] Jacksonville, Florida Wolfson Park Jacksonville Suns [29]
July 6, 1981 Southern League 10–3 Memphis Chicks[f] Memphis, Tennessee Tim McCarver Stadium Memphis Chicks 5,366 [31]
July 22, 1982 Southern League 7–4 Atlanta Braves Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham Barons 11,111 [32]
June 19, 1983 Southern League 3–2 Nashville Sounds Nashville, Tennessee Herschel Greer Stadium Nashville Sounds 1,221 [33]
June 21, 1984 West Division 2–1 East Division Greenville, South Carolina Greenville Municipal Stadium Greenville Braves 3,493 [34]
June 6, 1985 Houston Astros 3–0 Southern League Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham Barons 2,157 [35]
July 23, 1986 Nashville Sounds 4–2 Southern League Huntsville, Alabama Joe W. Davis Stadium Huntsville Stars 4,181 [36]
July 13, 1987 Southern League
Richmond Braves
3–3 (10 inn.)[g] Greenville, South Carolina Greenville Municipal Stadium Greenville Braves 2,919 [38]
July 13, 1988 East Division 6–5 (10 inn.) West Division Jacksonville, Florida Wolfson Park Jacksonville Suns 2,122 [39]
June 1, 1989 Southern League 5–3 Toronto Blue Jays Knoxville, Tennessee Bill Meyer Stadium Knoxville Blue Jays [40]
July 11, 1990 National League 3–2 American League Chattanooga, Tennessee Engel Stadium Chattanooga Lookouts 5,918 [41]
1991 No game held in lieu of the Double-A All-Star Game [42]
1992 No game held in lieu of the Double-A All-Star Game [43]
1993 No game held in lieu of the Double-A All-Star Game [44]
1994 No game held in lieu of the Double-A All-Star Game [45]
1995 No game held in lieu of the Double-A All-Star Game [46]
May 30, 1996 Chicago Cubs 8–0 Southern League Orlando, Florida Tinker Field Orlando Cubs 5,292 [47]
July 21, 1997 Southern League 9–5 Seattle Mariners Zebulon, North Carolina Five County Stadium Carolina Mudcats 8,123 [48]
June 22, 1998 Southern League 6–4 Mobile BayBears Mobile, Alabama Hank Aaron Stadium Mobile BayBears 5,453 [49]
June 23, 1999 West Division 5–2 East Division Jackson, Tennessee Pringles Park West Tenn Diamond Jaxx 4,169 [50][51]
June 20, 2000 West Division 6–3 East Division Greenville, South Carolina Greenville Municipal Stadium Greenville Braves 6,532 [52]
June 20, 2001 West Division 4–3 (10 inn.) East Division Kodak, Tennessee Smokies Stadium Tennessee Smokies 5,086 [53]
June 19, 2002 West Division 4–1 East Division Kodak, Tennessee Smokies Stadium Tennessee Smokies [54]
July 8, 2003 East Division 7–5 West Division Jacksonville, Florida Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville Jacksonville Suns 7,552 [55]
July 13, 2004 East Division 10–6 West Division Chattanooga, Tennessee BellSouth Park Chattanooga Lookouts 5,857 [56]
July 13, 2005 North Division 12–5 South Division Mobile, Alabama Hank Aaron Stadium Mobile BayBears [57]
July 10, 2006 North Division 9–4 South Division Montgomery, Alabama Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium Montgomery Biscuits 7,454 [58]
July 9, 2007 North Division 7–4 South Division Pearl, Mississippi Trustmark Park Mississippi Braves 4,555 [59]
July 14, 2008 North Division 6–1 South Division Zebulon, North Carolina Five County Stadium Carolina Mudcats 5,667 [60]
July 13, 2009 North Division 7–0 South Division Birmingham, Alabama Rickwood Field Birmingham Barons 7,127 [61]
July 12, 2010 North Division 3–2 South Division Huntsville, Alabama Joe W. Davis Stadium Huntsville Stars 7,782 [62]
June 21, 2011 North Division 6–3 South Division Jackson, Tennessee Pringles Park Jackson Generals 5,516 [63]
June 19, 2012 South Division 6–2 North Division Kodak, Tennessee Smokies Stadium Tennessee Smokies 5,406 [64]
July 17, 2013 South Division 6–0 North Division Jacksonville, Florida Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville Jacksonville Suns 9,373 [65]
June 24, 2014 South Division 6–4 North Division Chattanooga, Tennessee AT&T Field Chattanooga Lookouts 4,487 [66]
June 23, 2015 North Division 9–0 South Division Montgomery, Alabama Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium Montgomery Biscuits 5,891 [67]
June 21, 2016 South Division 5–1 North Division Pearl, Mississippi Trustmark Park Mississippi Braves 4,172 [68]
June 20, 2017 North Division
South Division
[h] Pensacola, Florida Admiral Fetterman Field Pensacola Blue Wahoos [69]
June 19, 2018 South Division 9–5 North Division Birmingham, Alabama Regions Field Birmingham Barons 8,500 [70]
June 18, 2019 North Division 7–3 South Division Biloxi, Mississippi MGM Park Biloxi Shuckers 4,209 [71]
June 30, 2020 Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic[i] Jackson, Tennessee Pringles Park Jackson Generals [73]


Most Valuable Player Award

The Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is bestowed on the player with the best performance at each All-Star Game. No award was given in the first eight games (1964–1971) or in 1973's rain-shortened game, but it has been awarded continuously since 1974. Eight players from the Birmingham Barons have been selected for the MVP Award, more than any other team in the league. The Jacksonville Expos/Suns have the second-most with five MVPs. Seven players from the Chicago White Sox organization have won the MVP Award, the most of any Major League Baseball organization. They are followed by the Detroit Tigers with five MVPs and the Atlanta Braves and Florida Marlins with four winners each. The only player to win the MVP Award more than once is Birmingham's Jeff Inglin, who won back-to-back in 1999 and 2000.[4]

A man in a red baseball jersey with "Sounds" written on the front in white and blue and a blue cap with a white "N" on the center stands on a baseball field swinging a bat.
Duane Walker, 1979 MVP
A man in a red baseball jersey with "Sounds" written on the front in white and blue and a blue cap with a white "N" on the center stands on a baseball field swinging a bat.
Chris Coghlan, 2008 MVP
Most Valuable Player Award Recipients
Year MVP Team Organization Position Ref.
1964 None selected [12]
1965 None selected [13]
1966 None selected [14]
1967 None selected [15]
1968 None selected [16]
1969 None selected [17]
1970 None selected [18]
1971 None selected [19]
1972 Bucky Dent Knoxville Sox Chicago White Sox Shortstop [20]
1973 None selected [4]
1974 Freddie Velázquez Savannah Braves Atlanta Braves Designated hitter [23]
1975 Roger Cador Savannah Braves Atlanta Braves Left fielder [24]
1976 Charles Smith Orlando Twins Minnesota Twins Relief pitcher [25]
1977 Lou Whitaker Montgomery Rebels Detroit Tigers Second baseman [26]
1978 Roger Alexander Savannah Braves Atlanta Braves Starting pitcher [27]
1979 Duane Walker Nashville Sounds Cincinnati Reds Center fielder [28]
1981 Jeff Kenaga Birmingham Barons Detroit Tigers Right fielder [74]
1982 Jeff Reynolds Knoxville Blue Jays Toronto Blue Jays Third baseman [32]
1983 George Foussianes Birmingham Barons Detroit Tigers Third baseman [75]
1984 Jack McKnight Knoxville Blue Jays Toronto Blue Jays Starting pitcher [34]
1985 Robbie Wine Columbus Astros Houston Astros Catcher [76]
1986 Terry Steinbach Huntsville Stars Oakland Athletics Catcher [36]
1987 Ron Gant Greenville Braves Atlanta Braves Second baseman [38]
1988 Randy Braun Jacksonville Expos Montreal Expos Left fielder [39]
1989 Harvey Pulliam Memphis Chicks Kansas City Royals Left fielder [40]
1990 Andy Mota Columbus Mudcats Houston Astros Second baseman [41]
1996 Geremi González Orlando Cubs Chicago Cubs Starting pitcher [77]
1997 Juan Encarnación Jacksonville Suns Detroit Tigers Right fielder [78]
1998 Gabe Kapler Jacksonville Suns Detroit Tigers Right fielder/designated hitter [49]
1999 Jeff Inglin Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Left fielder [50]
2000 Jeff Inglin Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Left fielder [79]
2001 Joe Borchard Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Center fielder [53]
2002 Alex Fernandez Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Outfielder [54]
2003 Víctor Díaz Jacksonville Suns Los Angeles Dodgers Second baseman [55]
2004 Jesse Gutierrez Chattanooga Lookouts Cincinnati Reds First baseman [56]
2005 Jeremy Hermida Carolina Mudcats Florida Marlins Right fielder [80]
2006 Scott Moore West Tenn Diamond Jaxx Chicago Cubs Third baseman [81]
2007 Lee Mitchell Carolina Mudcats Florida Marlins Third baseman [82]
2008 Chris Coghlan Carolina Mudcats Florida Marlins Second baseman [60]
2009 Josh Bell Chattanooga Lookouts Los Angeles Dodgers Third baseman [83]
2010 Matt Dominguez Jacksonville Suns Florida Marlins Third baseman [62]
2011 Scott Van Slyke Chattanooga Lookouts Los Angeles Dodgers First baseman [84]
2012 Alfredo Marte Mobile BayBears Arizona Diamondbacks Right fielder [85]
2013 Justin Greene Mobile BayBears Arizona Diamondbacks Left fielder [86]
2014 Taylor Motter Montgomery Biscuits Tampa Bay Rays Right fielder [87]
2015 Tim Anderson Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Shortstop [88]
2016 Phillip Ervin Pensacola Blue Wahoos Cincinnati Reds Outfielder [89]
2018 Zach Gibbons Mobile BayBears Los Angeles Angels Left fielder [90]
2019 Luis Robert Birmingham Barons Chicago White Sox Center fielder [11]

Notes

  1. ^ The game was cancelled due to rain.[16]
  2. ^ The game was called due to a loss of power from high winds in the top of the sixth inning.[17]
  3. ^ The game was called due to rain after five innings.[21]
  4. ^ The game was originally scheduled for June 27 at Birmingham but was rescheduled for August 13 at Jacksonville to accommodate the Minnesota Twins.[22]
  5. ^ The game was cancelled due to rain.[29]
  6. ^ The game was originally scheduled to be played in Savannah against the Atlanta Braves, but was changed to Memphis against the Chicks due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike.[30]
  7. ^ The game was called after 10 innings due to a lack of available pitchers on the All-Star Team.[37]
  8. ^ The game was cancelled due to rain.[69]
  9. ^ The game was cancelled on May 18 due to COVID-19 pandemic.[72]

References

Specific
  1. ^ a b "Southern League Announces 2019 Schedule". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. August 1, 2008. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  2. ^ "Biloxi to Host 2019 Southern League All-Star Game". Ballpark Digest. July 30, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  3. ^ "SL Sets First All-Star Tilt". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. July 13, 1964. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "League Records (1964–present)". 2019 Southern League Media Guide. Southern League. p. 141. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  5. ^ Squires, Tom (June 19, 1983). "Sounds Host Kuhn, All-Star Contest at Greer". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 1-C – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "SL Sets First All-Star Tilt". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. July 11, 1991. p. B-4 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Gonzalez, Roberto (July 11, 2002). "End Comes in Seventh". Hartford Courant. Hartford. p. C1 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ McMasters, Jared (June 14, 2019). "Minor League Standings Update & All-Star Game Rosters". Baseball America. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  9. ^ "2019 All-Star Game: South Division Roster". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. June 6, 2019. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  10. ^ a b "2019 All-Star Game: Updated Rosters". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. June 10, 2019. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Vilona, Bill (June 18, 2019). "Robert Puts on Show at All-Star Game". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  12. ^ a b Browning, Wilt (July 14, 1964). "Barons Outshine All-Stars, 7–2". The Charlotte Observer. Charlotte. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b Holliman, Ray (July 20, 1964). "Yanks Clip Stars in Squeaker, 4–3". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ a b Doane, Jack (August 9, 1965). "Bando Shins As A's Upset All-Stars, 6–1". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "Southern Stars Blank Braves". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. June 27, 1967. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ a b c Ballenger, Bill (June 25, 1968). "All Wet". The Charlotte News. Charlotte. p. 10A – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ a b c Holliman, Ray (July 20, 1964). "SL All-Stars Scalp Braves 7–1". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
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  21. ^ a b Doane, Jack (June 15, 1973). "Braves, All-Stars Tie, 2–2". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "All-Star Game Postponed". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. May 30, 1974. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b Skutt, Bill (August 14, 1974). "Southern Stars Top Twins, 3–1". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b "Southern Stars Top Twins, 3–1". Alabama Journal. Montgomery. July 25, 1975. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ a b McCarthy, Larry (May 28, 1976). "O-Twin Pitchers Do Their Thing But Atlanta Flogs Southern Stars". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. p. 1-C – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b McCarthy, Larry (July 8, 1977). "Southern League Stars Dump Braves, 6–4". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. p. 1-D – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ a b Hanna, Jeff (July 14, 1978). "Braves Pitchers Stifle Southern All-Stars 5–1". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ a b Squires, Tom (July 13, 1979). "Atlanta Yields to All-Stars 5–2". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ a b "SL All-Stars Rained Out". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. June 24, 1980. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ McCarthy, Larry (July 5, 1981). "Orlando Nearly Had the 'Stars'". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. p. 4-C – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ Squires, Tom (July 7, 1981). "All-Stars Fix The Chicks, 10–3". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ a b Morrow, Mike (July 23, 1982). "Reynolds, All-Stars Defeat Braves 7–4". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ Squires, Tom (June 20, 1983). "Sounds Fall to All-Stars at Greer". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 1-C – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ a b Kastner, Ernie (June 22, 1984). "SL's West Proves Best". The Greenville News. Greenville. p. 1-E – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Astros Top SL All-Stars". The Anniston Star. Anniston. June 7, 1985. p. 5B – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ a b "Sounds Silence Stars". The Greenville News. Greenville. July 24, 1986. p. 3D – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ Kastner, Ernie (July 14, 1987). "Gant Helps Stars Gain Tie". The Greenville News. Greenville. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ a b "Gant Most Valuable as Stars Tie Richmond". The Charlotte Observer. Charlotte. July 14, 1987. p. 5B – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ a b "East Beats West in SL Classic". The Greenville News. Greenville. July 14, 1988. p. 2D – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ a b "SL All-Stars 5, Blue Jays 3". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. June 2, 1989. p. B-4 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ a b "Mota Named MVP in Southern League All-Star Game". The Greenville News. Greenville. July 12, 1990. p. 2D – via Newspapers.com.
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  44. ^ Higgins, Ron (July 13, 1993). "NL Romps, 12–7, in AA All-Star Game". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore. p. 9C – via Newspapers.com.
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  50. ^ a b Loup, Rich (June 24, 1999). "Simply the West". The Jackson Sun. Jackson. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ Morris, Dan (June 24, 1999). "Fans Thrilled With Best of League". The Jackson Sun. Jackson. p. 3C – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ Davis, Adam (June 21, 2000). "Inglin Again Top Southern Star". The Greenville News. Greenville. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ a b "Borchard Lifts West Over East With 2-Run Blast". The Greenville News. Greenville. June 21, 2001. p. 6C – via Newspapers.com.
  54. ^ a b "West All-Stars Tops in Southern League". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. June 21, 2001. p. D5 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ a b Long, A. Stacy (July 9, 2003). "City: Purchase Approved". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. C3 – via Newspapers.com.
  56. ^ a b Paschall, David (July 14, 2004). "Gutierrez Keys East to Victory". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
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  58. ^ Gayle, Tim (July 11, 2006). "Northern Exposure". The Montgomery Advertiser. Montgomery. p. 1D – via Newspapers.com.
  59. ^ Cleveland, Rick; Christensen, Mike (July 10, 2007). "Hosts Fizzle in TeePee". Clarion-Ledger. Jackson. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
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