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South Carolina's 5th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

South Carolina's 5th congressional district
South Carolina US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
South Carolina's 5th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Ralph Norman
RRock Hill
Population (2015)678,910
Median income$51,131[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+9[2]

The 5th Congressional District of South Carolina is a congressional district in northern South Carolina bordering North Carolina. The district includes all of Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, Union and York counties and parts of Newberry, Spartanburg and Sumter counties. Outside the rapidly growing cities of Rock Hill, Fort Mill, and Lake Wylie the district is mostly rural and agricultural. The district borders were contracted from some of the easternmost counties in the 2012 redistricting.

The district's character is very similar to other mostly rural districts in the South. Democrats still hold most offices outside Republican-dominated York County. However, few of the area's Democrats can be described as liberal by national standards; most are fairly conservative on social issues, but less so on economics. The largest blocs of Republican voters are in the fast-growing suburbs of Charlotte, North Carolina and Cherokee County, which shares the Republican tilt of most of the rest of the Upstate. York County is by far the largest county in the district, with almost one-third of its population, and its Republican bent has pushed the district as a whole into the Republican column in recent years.

In November 2010, the Republican Mick Mulvaney defeated longtime Congressman John Spratt and became the first Republican since Robert Smalls and the end of Reconstruction to represent the district. Following Mulvaney's confirmation as the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, a special election was held in 2017 to determine his successor. Republican Ralph Norman narrowly won the special election against Archie Parnell.[3]

History

From 2003 to 2013 the district included all of Cherokee, Chester, Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Marlboro, Newberry and York counties and parts of Florence, Lee and Sumter counties.

Election results from presidential races

Year Result
2004 George W. Bush 57 - 42%
2008 John McCain 53.04 - 45.8%
2012 Mitt Romney 55.1 - 43.6%
2016 Donald Trump 57.3 - 38.8%

List of members representing the district

Member
(Residence)
Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
Thomas Tudor Tucker (1745-1828).jpg

Thomas Tudor Tucker
[data unknown/missing]
Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
1st
2nd
Elected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790.
[data unknown/missing]
1789–1793:
"Ninety-Six district"
South Carolina congressional districts  1st District, "Charleston"  2nd District, "Beaufort-Orangeburg"  3rd District, "Georgetown-Cheraw"  4th District, "Camden"  5th District, "Ninety-Six"
South Carolina congressional districts
  1st District, "Charleston"
  2nd District, "Beaufort-Orangeburg"
  3rd District, "Georgetown-Cheraw"
  4th District, "Camden"
  5th District, "Ninety-Six"
Alexander Gillon
[data unknown/missing]
Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
October 6, 1794
3rd Elected in 1793.
Died.
1793–1797:
"Ninety-Six district"
(Map unknown)
Vacant October 6, 1794 –
February 9, 1795
Robert Goodloe Harper - Project Gutenberg etext 20873 (cropped).jpg

Robert Goodloe Harper
[data unknown/missing]
Pro-Administration February 9, 1795 –
March 3, 1795
3rd
4th
5th
6th
Elected October 13–14, 1794 to finish Gillon's term and elected the same day to the next term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired.
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1801
1797–1803:
"Ninety-Six district"
1796 election results by district
1796 election results by district
William Butler
(Mount Willing)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
Richard Winn
(Winnsboro)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1813
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
[data unknown/missing]
1803–1813:
"Sumter district"
David R. Evans
(Winnsboro)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
13th Elected in 1812.
Retired.
1813–1823:
"Newberry district"
William Woodward
([data unknown/missing])
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
Starling Tucker
(Mountain Shoals)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1823
15th
16th
17th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
George-McDuffie.jpg

George McDuffie
(Charleston)
Democratic-Republican (Jackson) March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1834.
Resigned to become Governor of South Carolina.
1823–1833:
"Edgefield district"
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1831
Nullifier March 4, 1831 –
1834
1833–1843:
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant 1834 –
December 8, 1834
23rd
Francis Wilkinson Pickens.jpg

Francis W. Pickens
(Edgefield)
Nullifier December 8, 1834 –
March 3, 1839
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
Elected to finish McDuffie's term.
[data unknown/missing]
Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
Armistead Burt
(Abbeville)
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1853
28th
29th
30th
31st
32nd
[data unknown/missing]
James Lawrence Orr - Brady-Handy.jpg

James L. Orr
(Anderson)
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1859
33rd
34th
35th
[data unknown/missing]
JohnDAshmore.jpg

John D. Ashmore
(Greenville)
Democratic March 4, 1859 –
December 21, 1860
36th [data unknown/missing]
Resigned.
Vacant December 21, 1860 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Civil War
District eliminated March 4, 1863
District re-established March 4, 1875
Robert Smalls - Brady-Handy.jpg

Robert Smalls
(Beaufort)
Republican March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
[data unknown/missing]
GeorgeDTillman.jpg

George D. Tillman
(Edgefield)
Democratic March 4, 1879 –
July 19, 1882
46th
47th
Lost contested election
Robert Smalls - Brady-Handy.jpg

Robert Smalls
(Beaufort)
Republican July 19, 1882 –
March 3, 1883
47th Won contested election
John James Hemphill.jpg

John J. Hemphill
(Chester)
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1893
48th
49th
50th
51st
52nd
[data unknown/missing]
Thomas Jefferson Strait.jpg

Thomas J. Strait
(Lancaster)
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1899
53rd
54th
55th
[data unknown/missing]
DavidEFinley.jpg

David E. Finley
(York)
Democratic March 4, 1899 –
January 26, 1917
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
[data unknown/missing]
Died.
Vacant January 26, 1917 –
February 21, 1917
64th
PaulGMcCorkle.jpg

Paul G. McCorkle
(York)
Democratic February 21, 1917 –
March 3, 1917
[data unknown/missing]
STEVENSON, WILLIAM F. HONORABLE LCCN2016859711.jpg

William F. Stevenson
(Cheraw)
Democratic March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1933
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
[data unknown/missing]
James Richards portrait, 1956.jpg

James P. Richards
(Lancaster)
Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1957
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
[data unknown/missing]
Robert Hemphill portrait.jpg

Robert W. Hemphill
(Chester)
Democratic January 3, 1957 –
May 1, 1964
85th
86th
87th
88th
[data unknown/missing]
Resigned to become Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
Vacant May 1, 1964 –
November 3, 1964
88th
Thomas S. Gettys.jpg

Thomas S. Gettys
(Rock Hill)
Democratic November 3, 1964 –
December 31, 1974
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
[data unknown/missing]
Kenneth Lamar Holland.jpg

Kenneth L. Holland
(Gaffney)
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1983
94th
95th
96th
97th
[data unknown/missing]
John Spratt, official portrait, 111th Congress.jpg

John Spratt
(York)
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 2011
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
[data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
Mick Mulvaney 113th Congress.jpg

Mick Mulvaney
(Lancaster)
Republican January 3, 2011 –
February 16, 2017
112th
113th
114th
115th
[data unknown/missing]
Resigned to become Director of the Office of Management and Budget
Vacant February 16, 2017 –
June 20, 2017
115th
Ralph Norman official photo cropped.jpg

Ralph Norman
(Rock Hill)
Republican June 20, 2017[3]
present
115th
116th
Elected to finish Mulvaney's term.
Re-elected in 2018.

Historical district boundaries

1995 - 2013
1995 - 2013

Election results

2017 special

General election results[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ralph Norman 45,076 51.04% -8.03%
Democratic Archie Parnell 42,341 47.94% +9.17%
American Josh Thornton 319 0.36% -1.74%
Libertarian Victor Kocher 273 0.31% N/A
Green David Kulma 242 0.27% N/A
Write-in Write-in 65 0.07% 0.0%
Total votes 88,316 100.00%
Majority 2,836 3.23%
Turnout 88,316 18.24%
Republican win

In popular culture

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=45&cd=05
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b https://www.nytimes.com/elections/results/south-carolina-house-special-election
  4. ^ "Special Election – U.S. House District 5, State House Districts 48 and 70 – June 20, 2017". South Carolina State Election Commission. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Massachusetts's 7th congressional district
Home district of the Speaker of the House
December 7, 1857 – March 3, 1859
Succeeded by
New Jersey's 5th congressional district

Coordinates: 34°29′N 80°58′W / 34.49°N 80.97°W / 34.49; -80.97

This page was last edited on 27 April 2020, at 12:35
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