To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The winds of the Mediterranean

Sirocco (/sɪˈrɒk/), scirocco, jugo or, rarely, siroc (Catalan: Xaloc); Sicilian: sciroccu; Greek: Σορόκος; Italian: scirocco; Spanish: siroco; Maltese: xlokk; Albanian: shirok; Occitan: siròc, eisseròc; Serbo-Croatian: jugo, Libyan Arabic: ghibli; Egypt: khamsin; Tunisia: شْلُوقْ chluq or شْهِيلِي ch'hili) is a Mediterranean wind that comes from the Sahara and can reach hurricane speeds in North Africa and Southern Europe, especially during the summer season.

Sirocco wind diagram by Piotr Flatau
Sirocco wind diagram by Piotr Flatau

Development

It arises from a warm, dry, tropical airmass that is pulled northward by low-pressure cells moving eastward across the Mediterranean Sea, with the wind originating in the Arabian or Sahara deserts.[1] The hotter, drier continental air mixes with the cooler, wetter air of the maritime cyclone, and the counter-clockwise circulation of the low propels the mixed air across the southern coasts of Europe.

Effects

The sirocco causes dusty dry conditions along the northern coast of Africa, storms in the Mediterranean Sea, and cool wet weather in Europe. The sirocco's duration may be as short as half a day or may last several days. While passing over the Mediterranean Sea, the sirocco picks up moisture; this results in rainfall in the southern part of Italy, known locally as "blood rain" due to the red sand mixed with the falling rain. Many people attribute health problems to the sirocco, either because of the heat and dust along the African coastal regions, or because of the cool dampness in Europe. The dust within the sirocco winds can cause abrasion in mechanical devices and penetrate buildings.

Sirocco winds with speeds of up to 100 km/h (62 mph/54 knots) are most common during autumn and spring. They reach a peak in March and in November when it is very hot.

When combined with a rising tide, the sirocco can cause the acqua alta phenomenon in the Venetian Lagoon.

References

  1. ^ Golden Gate Weather Services. Names of Winds. Retrieved on 2006-12-28.

External links

  • Winds of the world
  • Local Mediterranean winds
  • "Sirocco" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911.
This page was last edited on 8 May 2020, at 05:42
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.