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Shubert Theatre (Broadway)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shubert Theatre
Shuberttheatre.jpg
Address225 West 44th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′29″N 73°59′14″W / 40.75806°N 73.98722°W / 40.75806; -73.98722
Public transitSubway: Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal
OwnerShubert and Booth Theatre, LLC
OperatorThe Shubert Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,502[1]
ProductionPOTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass Are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive
Construction
OpenedOctober 2, 1913
ArchitectHenry Beaumont Herts
Website
Official website
DesignatedDecember 15, 1987[2]
Reference no.1378[2]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedDecember 15, 1987[3]
Reference no.1379[3]
Designated entityLobby and auditorium interior

The Shubert Theatre is a Broadway theater at 225 West 44th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1913, the theater was designed by Henry Beaumont Herts in the Italian Renaissance style and was built for the Shubert brothers. Lee and J. J. Shubert had named the theater in memory of their brother Sam S. Shubert, who died in an accident several years before the theater's opening. It has 1,502 seats across three levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. The facade and interior are New York City landmarks.

The Shubert's facade is made of brick and terracotta, with sgraffito decorations designed in stucco. Three arches face south onto 44th Street, and a curved corner faces east toward Broadway. To the east, the Shubert Alley facade includes doors to the lobby and the stage house. The auditorium contains an orchestra level, two balconies, and a flat ceiling. The space is decorated with mythological murals throughout. Near the front of the auditorium, flanking the elliptical proscenium arch, are box seats at balcony level. The upper levels contain offices formerly occupied by the Shubert brothers, and the stage house to the north is shared with the Booth Theatre.

The Shubert brothers developed the Booth and Shubert theaters as their first venues on the block. The Shubert Theatre opened on October 2, 1913, with a revival of Hamlet. The theater has hosted numerous long-running musicals throughout its history, such as Bells Are Ringing and Promises, Promises. Since the 1970s, the Shubert has hosted relatively few shows, including long runs of the musicals A Chorus Line, Crazy for You, Chicago, Spamalot, Memphis, and Matilda the Musical.

Site

Drawing of the theater's site in 1916. The Shubert and Booth theaters are at upper left.
Drawing of the theater's site in 1916. The Shubert and Booth theaters are at upper left.

The Shubert Theatre is on 225 West 44th Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Seventh Avenue, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[4] It shares a land lot with the Booth Theatre directly to the north, though the theaters are separate buildings.[5][6] The lot covers 25,305 square feet (2,350.9 m2), with a frontage of 126 feet (38 m) on 44th and 45th Streets and 200.83 feet (61 m) on Shubert Alley to the east.[5] The Shubert Theatre building takes up 110 feet (34 m) of the Shubert Alley frontage and measures about 110 feet wide on 44th Street.[7][8]

The Shubert is part of the largest concentration of Broadway theaters on a single block.[9] It adjoins six other theaters: the Majestic and Broadhurst to the west; the John Golden, Bernard B. Jacobs, and Gerald Schoenfeld to the northwest; and the Booth to the north. Other nearby structures include the Row NYC Hotel to the west; the Music Box Theatre and Imperial Theatre one block north; One Astor Plaza to the east; 1501 Broadway to the southeast; Sardi's restaurant to the south; and the Hayes Theater and St. James Theatre to the southwest.[5] The Broadhurst, Schoenfeld (originally Plymouth), Booth, and Shubert theaters were all developed by the Shubert brothers between 44th and 45th Streets, occupying land previously owned by the Astor family.[10][11] The Shuberts bought the land under all four theaters from the Astors in 1948.[11][12]

The Shubert and Booth theaters were developed as a pair and are the oldest theaters on the block.[13][14] The site was previously occupied by several houses on 44th and 45th Street.[15] The adjacent Shubert Alley, built along with the Shubert and Booth theaters,[16][17] was originally a 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) fire escape passage.[18] Shubert Alley's presence not only allowed the theaters to meet fire regulations[19][20] but also enabled the structures to be designed as corner lots.[6] Originally, the theaters faced the Hotel Astor, now the location of One Astor Plaza, across the alley.[10][21] Another private alley runs to the west, between the Booth/Shubert and Broadhurst/Schoenfeld theaters.[22] The Broadhurst and Schoenfeld were also built as a pair, occupying land left over from the development of the Shubert and Booth; these too are designed with curved corners facing Broadway.[23]

Design

The Shubert Theatre was designed by Henry Beaumont Herts and constructed in 1913 for the Shubert brothers.[4][24] Herts was an experienced theatrical architect and had previously led the firm of Herts & Tallant, which designed such theaters as the Lyceum, the New Amsterdam, and the Liberty.[25][26] The Shubert and Booth theaters are within separate buildings and differ in their interior designs and functions,[7][27] although they have adjacent stage areas near the center of the block.[6] The Shubert was the larger house, intended to be suitable for musicals, and the Shubert family's offices were placed above the auditorium there.[28] By contrast, the Booth was intended to be smaller and more intimate.[29] The Shubert Theatre is operated by The Shubert Organization.[1][30][31]

Facade

The facades of the two theaters are similar in arrangement, being designed in the Italian Renaissance style[20][32] or the Venetian Renaissance style.[33] The structures both have curved corners facing Broadway, since most audience members reached the theaters from that direction.[6][34] The Shubert's facade is made of white brick, laid in English-cross bondwork, as well as terracotta.[7][32][35] The bricks are laid in alternating courses of headers (with their short sides exposed) and stretchers (with their long sides exposed).[35] An early source described the theaters' facades as being made of white marble, with stucco and faience panels.[20] The main section of the theater rises six stories and is topped by a cornice with dentils. Above the cornice is a sheet-metal mansard roof.[36] A critic for Architecture magazine wrote that Herts had "discovered an excellent motive for a single facade", although it "would perhaps have been more amusing" if the two theaters had contained different facades.[19]

According to the New-York Tribune, the theaters' use of hand-carved sgraffito for decoration made Herts "the first man to have used sgraffito for this purpose".[27] The sgraffito was used because of New York City building codes that prevented decorations from projecting beyond their lot lines.[37][38][39] These decorations were colored light-gray, placed on a purple-gray background.[35][40] The sgraffito on the two theaters is one of the few such examples that remain in New York City. A contemporary source said the theaters' facades were "free from much of the gaudy trappings that has made some of the recent playhouses commonplace in appearance".[38]

44th Street

44th Street facade, 2007
44th Street facade, 2007

At ground level, the 44th Street elevation contains a tall water table of painted stone, above which is a band with rusticated blocks of terracotta. There are three arches at the center of the facade, which provide an emergency exit from the lobby.[7][36] Each archway originally contained a pair of paneled wooden double doors, but these have since been replaced with glass doors. On either side of the arches are rectangular sign boards topped by triangular pediments.[36] Within the archways above the doors are sgraffito paintings, which depict figures within aedicules.[37][38] These paintings are partially obscured by a modern marquee that is cantilevered from the wall above. The archways are surrounded by rusticated voissoirs.[36]

Above the archways, the theater's facade is made of brick. The brick section of the facade is surrounded by a stucco band of sgraffito decorations, which is painted white and contains bas reliefs of classical-style foliate ornamentation. Outside this stucco band is another sgraffito band, divided into panels that depict female figures and griffins. The extreme left (west) and right (east) ends of the facade contain vertical sequences of terracotta quoins; they have Corinthian-style capitals that are decorated with motifs of rams, lions' heads, and acanthus leaves. At the top of the brick wall, the paneled sgraffito band is split up into three sections, each with a curved broken pediment and carvings of masks. Above each pediment is a set of triple windows at the sixth story, surrounded by a terracotta frame. Each triple window contains a window sill, which projects outward slightly and is supported by corbels that depict winged heads. Octagonal terracotta panels separate each set of triple windows. The mansard roof has three sets of dormer windows on this elevation.[36]

Southeast corner

Due to the theater's location at the corner of 44th Street and Shubert Alley, the southeast corner of the facade is curved.[34][36] This corner section has a doorway at the center, containing glass-and-metal doors; these are shielded by a canopy that extends to the curb on 44th Street.[36] There are stone pilasters on either side of the doorway, which contain cartouches and sign boards. Above the doors is a broken pediment shaped like a segmental arch. The center of the broken pediment has an oval sgraffito panel with scrolls on the sides and a scalloped shell above it.[38][41] The panel depicts a figure that carries a sign with the words "Henry B. Herts, Architect 1913".[36]

A brick wall rises from the doorway, and a sign board is mounted on the wall. The brick is surrounded by a stucco band with sgraffito foliate decorations, which retains its original colors. Like on 44th Street, there are vertical quoins with Corinthian capitals on the left and right. At the top of the brick wall, there is a broken pediment, within which is a theatrical mask and a shield. This broken pediment is topped by a pair of windows at the sixth story, surrounded by a terracotta frame. The windows share a slightly projecting sill, which is supported by corbels that depict winged heads.[42]

Shubert Alley

Shubert Alley facade, 2007
Shubert Alley facade, 2007

On Shubert Alley, the facade is divided into the auditorium to the left (south) and the stage house to the right (north). The auditorium section contains three sets of glass-and-metal doors: two from the auditorium, on the left, and one leading to the Shuberts' upper-story offices, on the right. A metal marquee hangs over these doors. Like the elevations on 44th Street and at the southeast corner, the left side of the auditorium facade contains vertical quoins topped by a Corinthian capital. Also similar to the 44th Street elevation, there is a brick wall section above the first floor, surrounded by a stucco sgraffito band with bas-reliefs and a paneled sgraffito band. At the top of the brick wall are three broken pediments and three sets of windows surrounded by terracotta frames. The main difference from the 44th Street elevation is that the center set of windows contains two openings rather than three, and there is no roof dormer above the center windows.[43]

The stage house section, shared with the Booth Theatre to the north, is simpler in design, being made mainly of brick in English cross bond. The ground floor has doorways, metal panels, and sign boards. A band of quoins separates the stage house from the Shubert auditorium to the left and the Booth Theatre to the right. The second to fourth floors have one-over-one sash windows, while the fifth floor has a terracotta shield at the center. The top of the stage house contains a parapet, above which is a sgraffito panel surrounded by bricks.[43]

Interior

Lobby

The lobby is composed of an elliptical space, accessed from the southeast corner of the theater, and a rectangular space, accessed from two of the doors on Shubert Alley. The north wall of the lobby contains ticket windows, while the west wall contains doors to the auditorium.[44] Originally, the space was described as a elaborate green-marble room accessed by heavy oak doors.[7] The marble mosaic-tile floor is decorated with foliate patterns. At the top of the walls is a frieze depicting waves and talons, as well as a cornice with modillions.[45] The rectangular section of the lobby contains a vaulted ceiling, which is split into multiple sections by moldings. There is an octagonal panel. surrounded by laurel leaves, at the center of the vault. The elliptical section of the lobby has a domed ceiling decorated with moldings and laurel leaves.[46]

Auditorium

View from the balcony toward the stage
View from the balcony toward the stage

The auditorium has an orchestra level, two balconies, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The auditorium is wider than its depth, and the space is designed with plaster decorations in relief.[45] According to the Shubert Organization, the theater has 1,502 seats;[1] meanwhile, The Broadway League gives a figure of 1,460 seats[30] and Playbill cites 1,435 seats.[31] The physical seats are divided into 700 seats in the orchestra, 410 on the mezzanine/first balcony, 350 on the second balcony, and 16 in the boxes. There are 26 standing-only spots, as well as 28 removable seats in the orchestra pit.[1] The theater contains restrooms in the basement, mezzanine, and balcony. The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible, but the restrooms and other seating levels are not.[1][31] The theater originally had a capacity of 1,400 seats.[7][8][27]

The New York Times described the decorative scheme as originally being "old Venetian gold, absinthe green, and amethyst".[7] Mythological motifs are heavily featured in the interior.[33] J. Mortimer Lichtenauer painted murals along the boxes, the area above the proscenium arch, and the ceiling. The murals contain figures with masks of Minoan and renaissance inspiration, as well as semi-nude females depicting music and drama.[47][48] There were twenty-one figures; a contemporary publication said the murals had been completed in "a little less than two days".[49] Architecture magazine cited the Shubert's interior as being "good of the more accepted theatre interior design", despite not being of "such exceptional excellence" as the neighboring Booth.[19]

Seating areas

The rear or southern end of the orchestra contains a promenade[45] measuring 15 feet (4.6 m) deep.[7] Four piers, topped by plain capitals, support the mezzanine level and separate the promenade from the orchestra seating.[50] The top of the orchestra promenade's walls contain a frieze with phoenixes and foliate decorations; several niches with arched pediments are placed within the frieze.[51] The ceiling is a barrel vault, split into multiple sections by moldings; it contains an octagonal panel at the center.[50] There are also lighting sconces and a standing rail in the orchestra promenade.[52] Stairs in the promenade lead up to the mezzanine and balcony. The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage.[45] The orchestra has paneled plasterwork side walls with fabric coverings, as well as lighting sconces.[53]

The mezzanine and balcony are both steeply raked.[45] The rear of the mezzanine contains a promenade, similar to that on the orchestra.[7][45] The underside of the mezzanine contains moldings and foliation, which surround murals that depict classical scenes. In front of the mezzanine and the balcony are plasterwork panels with swags and theatrical masks; the balcony's front rail is covered by light boxes.[53] The side walls of both the mezzanine and the balcony contain plasterwork panels with fabric coverings; a shallow cornice separates the mezzanine from the balcony. There are doorways on both levels, above which are friezes with scroll decorations. Two of the doorways on the balcony have panels that depict swags and shields. A frieze runs above the balcony, wrapping above the boxes and proscenium.[51] There is a technical booth at the rear of the balcony.[52]

On either side of the stage is a splayed wall section, which includes an elliptical arch with one box at the mezzanine level.[45] Similar boxes were installed on the orchestra level but have since been removed.[52] The front railings of the boxes contain motifs of scallops and swags, while the undersides are decorated with scrolled brackets and foliate panels. The archways themselves are mostly filled with paneled plaster walls, with a doorway leading into each box.[51] The doorways have eared surrounds, and the tops of the doorways contain rectangular panels with light fixtures. The archways are surrounded by coved bands with urns and foliate decorations. Above these arches are murals with swags, foliate decorations, and female figures, surrounded by a band of foliate decorations.[53] The boxes were decorated in "old Venetian gold", while the paintings above were predominantly colored "absinthe green and amethyst".[54]

Other design features
Ceiling detail
Ceiling detail

Next to the boxes is a coved, segmental proscenium arch. The coved section has octagonal panels, which are separated either by fan motifs or by sunbursts and foliate decorations.[50] The proscenium opening measures about 38 feet 9 inches (11.81 m) wide and 28 feet 6 inches (8.69 m) tall.[1] Above the proscenium arch is an octagonal panel containing a mural. On either side of the mural are female representations of music and drama, surrounded by a band of foliate decorations. A frieze also runs above the proscenium; it depicts female figures alternating with shields and winged figures.[51] The depth of the auditorium to the proscenium is 33 feet 10 inches (10.31 m), while the depth to the front of the stage is 36 feet (11 m).[1] The stage itself was described as being 35 feet (11 m) deep and 80 feet (24 m) wide behind the proscenium. The stage lighting was controlled by a switchboard, placed on a terrace to one side of the stage.[7]

The flat ceiling is hexagonal in shape, split into sections by molded bands.[45] There is a square panel at the center of the ceiling, surrounded by hexagonal panels that contain murals. The central panel is itself divided into sections, with smaller panels that surround a square section; the mural in the central square has been removed.[53] Six chandeliers hang from the ceiling: two above the orchestra and four above the second balcony.[32][52] The ceiling contains air-conditioning vents, as well as a suspended truss.[52]

Other interior spaces

The dressing rooms are separated from the stages of each theater by a heavy fireproof wall.[7][27] The two theaters are separated from each other by a 2-foot-thick (0.61 m) wall.[6][55] A gift shop called One Shubert Alley opened between the Shubert and Booth theaters in 1979, within three of the Booth's former dressing rooms.[56] The emergency exits of both theaters were composed of "fire- and smoke-proof towers" rather than exterior fire escapes.[57]

Shubert offices

The top two stories were designed as offices for the Shuberts.[27] Lee Shubert had a circular office on the third floor, facing the street, which he occupied until his death in 1953.[58] His younger brother Jacob J. Shubert, also known as J. J., had a three-room office in the rear of the third floor.[59] Lee often referred to the third and fourth stories as "my offices", implying J. J.'s subordinate position in the firm.[58][60] There were also offices for casting directors, secretaries, and telephone operators; a kitchen and dining room; a bedroom; and a bathroom.[58] The Shubert offices had a large safe for storing money, in the days when the theatrical industry operated mainly as a cash business, though this was subsequently converted to a storage area for drinks.[61] By 1926, when Lee and J. J.'s relationship became strained,[62] J. J. had moved to Sardi's restaurant, while Lee remained atop the Shubert Theatre.[62][63]

Following Lee's death, his office was occupied by his nephew Milton Shubert,[64][65] who quit in 1954 after an acrimonious dispute with J. J. regarding who should lead the Shubert family's theaters.[66][65] The law firm of Schoenfeld & Jacobs, headed by Gerald Schoenfeld and Bernard B. Jacobs, occupied the Shubert Theater offices for free in the 1970s.[67] Jacobs occupied Lee Shubert's suite until his death in 1996.[68] For several decades, producer Alexander H. Cohen also had offices in the Shubert Theatre and was known as the "third Shubert",[69] despite conflicting with Jacobs and Schoenfeld over rent in the mid-1980s.[70] By the theater's 100th anniversary in 2013, Lee's former dining room had been divided into offices for Shubert president Robert E. Wankel and chairman Philip J. Smith.[61]

History

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[71] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[72][73] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Shubert Theatre.[74] The venue was developed by the Shubert brothers of Syracuse, New York, who expanded downstate into New York City in the first decade of the 20th century.[75][76] After Sam S. Shubert died in a railroad accident in 1905, his brothers Lee and J. J. expanded their theatrical operations significantly.[77][78] Sam had been 26 years old at the time of his death.[79] His brothers decided to construct five theaters across the United States in his honor, all named the Sam S. Shubert Memorial Theatre.[6][78] The Shuberts later dropped the word "memorial" from these theaters' names, citing the word's "unpleasant connotation".[62]

Development and early years

Construction

Detail of a chandelier in the theater
Detail of a chandelier in the theater

As the Shuberts were developing theaters in the early 1910s, theatrical producer Winthrop Ames was planning to build a replacement for the New Theatre. Though the New had been completed in 1909, Ames and the theater's founders saw the venue, on the Upper West Side, as being too large and too far away from Times Square.[80] The New Theatre's founders acquired several buildings at 219–225 West 44th Street and 218–230 West 45th Street in March 1911, for the construction of a "new New Theatre" there.[15] The theater would have contained a private alley to the east.[15] The project was canceled in December 1911, after the site had been cleared, when Ames announced he would build the Little Theatre (now the Hayes Theater) across 44th Street.[81][82] The New Theatre's founders cited the difficulty of finding a director for the new New Theatre, as well as possible competition with Ames's Little Theatre.[83]

In April 1912, Winthrop Ames and Lee Shubert decided to lease the site of the new New Theatre from the Astor family.[83][84] Two theaters would be built on the site, along with a private alley to their east.[83][84] Shubert's theater was to be the larger of the venues, being on 44th Street, while Ames's theater would be on 45th Street and would have a smaller seating capacity.[57][85][86] The larger theater was known as the Sam S. Shubert Theatre, in memory of Lee's late brother, while the smaller one was named after actor Edwin Booth.[86][87]

Documents indicate that several architects were consulted for the theaters' design, including Clarence H. Blackall, before the Shuberts hired Henry B. Herts for the job.[86] An "ice palace" was also planned on the site now occupied by the Broadhurst and Schoenfeld theaters.[86][88] Work on the two theaters started in May 1912.[20][57] The next month, the new-building application for the New Theatre (which had been filed in 1911) was withdrawn, and two new-building applications for Shubert's and Ames's theaters were filed.[89] Herts began accepting bids for construction contractors that July,[90] and the Fleischmann Bros. Company was selected the following month to construct both of the new theaters.[91] The project encountered several delays and disputes over costs. Documents indicate that the Fleischmann Bros. had expressed concerns of imprecise drawings and fired several workers.[92] Further delays occurred when Ames requested several changes to the Booth's design in mid-1912; Herts said this would require the plans to be completely redone, while J. J. Shubert believed the changes were superficial. The Fleischmann Bros. warned that the delays could set back the project further, as the sgraffito ornament could not be installed during winter.[40]

Opening and initial productions

By August 1913, British actor Johnston Forbes-Robertson and his wife Gertrude Elliott had announced their plans to open the new Shubert Theatre with a season of plays in repertory.[93] The New-York Tribune reported that Forbes-Robertson's appearance would "establish a dramatic precedent of the highest order".[27][38] The first event at the new Shubert Theatre was a reception for Forbes-Robertson on September 29, 1913, with Julia Marlowe, Augustus Thomas, and DeWolf Hopper making speeches.[94][95] Three days later, on October 2, the theater officially opened with a revival of Hamlet, starring Forbes-Robertson.[96][97][98][a] This coincided with the opening of Shubert Alley, which was first used during Hamlet's intermission.[16] At the theater's opening, Lee Shubert said, "In using for this new theatre the name of Sam S. Shubert, we consecrate it in the most solemn manner we know."[100] At the time, there were just two other theaters on the surrounding blocks: the Little Theatre and the now-demolished Weber and Fields' Music Hall.[18]

The Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company's productions included Shakespeare plays,[101] as well as other works such as George Bernard Shaw's play Caesar and Cleopatra.[102] The first original production at the Shubert was the Percy MacKaye play A Thousand Years Ago, which premiered in January 1914.[103][104] Next came the theater's first musical, The Belle of Bond Street with Gaby Deslys and Sam Bernard,[105] which closed after a short run.[101][106] A revival of George du Maurier's play Trilby opened at the theater in 1915.[107][108][109] Later that year, the Shubert hosted its first major success: the Franz Lehár operetta Alone at Last.[110][111] Herbert J. Krapp, who subsequently designed numerous theaters for the Shubert family, designed a canopy on the Shubert Theatre's facade in 1915.[94]

Jerome Kern's musical Love O' Mike, featuring Clifton Webb and Peggy Wood, opened at the Shubert in 1917.[110][112][113] The Sigmund Romberg operetta Maytime opened later that year, featuring Wood and Charles Purcell;[114][115] its success prompted the Shuberts to simultaneously stage the production at the 44th Street Theatre.[110] This was followed in 1918 by the drama The Copperhead with Lionel Barrymore,[116][117] as well as the Rudolf Friml musical Sometime with Francine Larrimore, Mae West, and Ed Wynn.[118][119] The musicals Good Morning Judge and The Magic Melody both had several-month-long runs at the Shubert in 1919,[120] and Julia Marlowe and E. H. Sothern presented a four-week-long program of Shakespeare plays later that year.[121][122]

1920s and 1930s

Curved corner of the facade
Curved corner of the facade

The Shubert hosted the drama The Blue Flame with Theda Bara in 1920,[117][123] followed the next year by the play The Trial of Joan of Arc with Margaret Anglin.[117][124] The Shubert also hosted several revues in the mid-1920s,[120] including four editions of the Greenwich Village Follies[125] and the 1923 edition of Artists and Models.[126][127][128] Besides these revues, the musical The Magnolia Lady with Ralph Forbes and Ruth Chatterton opened at the Shubert in 1924, though it had a relatively brief run.[129][130] The Shakespeare play Othello with Walter Hampden opened at the theater in 1925,[131][132] followed the same year by the revue Gay Paree with Charles "Chic" Sale.[129][133] Next, Emmerich Kálmán's operetta Countess Maritza opened at the Shubert in 1926[134][135] and was highly popular.[136] Further hits arrived in 1927 with the musical Yours Truly, featuring Leon Errol,[137][138] and the revue Padlocks of 1927, with Texas Guinan and Lillian Roth.[137][139]

Zoe Akins's play The Furies with Laurette Taylor was a flop in 1928,[137][140] and Ups-a-Daisy had a short run the same year, with the then-little-known actor Bob Hope in the cast.[141][142] The revue A Night in Venice[143][144] and the musical The Street Singer both were staged the next year.[145][146] Subsequently, Fritz Leiber's Chicago Civic Shakespeare Company came to the Shubert in 1930,[147][148] presenting three plays in repertory.[144] Walter Slezak had his musical debut the same year in Meet My Sister.[149][150] The musical Everybody's Welcome opened the next year with Ann Pennington, Ann Sothern, Oscar Shaw, and Frances Williams;[151][152][153] Sothern, then known as Harriette Lake, had her musical debut in that show.[149] The revue Americana opened at the theater in 1932.[151][154] This was followed the next year by Gay Divorce, with Fred Astaire and Claire Luce;[155][156][157] this was Astaire's last appearance in a Broadway musical.[141]

For the next several years, the Shubert hosted a series of straight plays (as opposed to musicals).[158] Among these was Sidney Howard's play Dodsworth, which opened in February 1934 and featured Fay Bainter and Walter Huston;[159][160] the show took a brief hiatus in mid-1934[161] and continued for several months afterward.[162] This was followed in 1936 by Robert E. Sherwood's Idiot's Delight, featuring theatrical couple Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne.[159][163] The play, the first show at the Shubert to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama,[164][165] ran for a year.[166] Next was Maxwell Anderson's The Masque of Kings, featuring Dudley Digges, Leo G. Carroll, Henry Hull, and Margo, which opened in 1937[167] and was a flop.[168][169] The same year, the Shubert saw the Rodgers and Hart musical Babes in Arms,[159][170][171] as well as the Theatre Guild production Amphitryon 38 with Lunt and Fontanne.[159][172][173] The Rodgers and Hart musical I Married an Angel opened in 1938, featuring Vera Zorina.[159][174][175] The next year, the Theatre Guild hosted the play The Philadelphia Story at the Shubert, featuring Katharine Hepburn;[168][176] it saved the Guild from bankruptcy[177] and ran for 417 performances.[178][179]

1940s and 1950s

The Shubert Theatre hosted the Rodgers and Hart musical Higher and Higher in 1940,[180][181][182] which was one of the partnership's few failures.[177] This was followed the same year by the Guy Bolton musical Hold On to Your Hats, with Al Jolson and Martha Raye.[168][183][184] The Shubert then hosted a revival of George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma in 1941, with Cornell and Raymond Massey.[185][186][187] A revival of Richard Brinsley Sheridan's The Rivals opened in 1942 with Mary Boland, Bobby Clark, Helen Ford, and Walter Hampden;[185][188][189] and the Rodgers and Hart musical By Jupiter launched the same year with Ray Bolger.[185][190][191] Subsequently, Margaret Webster's revival of Othello opened in 1943 with José Ferrer, Uta Hagen, and Paul Robeson.[192][193][194] The Shubert's productions in 1944 included the play Catherine Was Great with Mae West,[185][195][196] as well as Harold Arlen and E. Y. Harburg's musical comedy Bloomer Girl.[185][197][198]

In January 1947, the Shubert hosted the Victor Herbert musical Sweethearts, featuring Bobby Clark and Marjorie Gateson,[199][200] for 288 performances.[201][202] This was followed the same December by a transfer of the musical High Button Shoes, with Nanette Fabray and Phil Silvers,[203][204] which stayed for almost a year before transferring again.[205][206] The Maxwell Anderson play Anne of the Thousand Days with Rex Harrison then opened at the Shubert in late 1948,[199][207][208] and Lunt and Fontanne appeared the next year in I Know My Love.[199][209][210] A plaque celebrating the Shuberts' achievements was installed on the theater's east wall in 1949.[211] Subsequently, Cole Porter's musical comedy Kiss Me, Kate relocated to the Shubert in 1950,[203] staying for a year.[212][213] Lerner and Loewe's musical Paint Your Wagon opened at the Shubert in 1951[214][215][216] and featured James Barton for 289 performances.[215][217][218] Next, the Shaw play The Millionairess opened in 1952 and featured Katharine Hepburn and Cyril Ritchard.[214][219][220]

The Shubert hosted the Peter Ustinov play The Love of Four Colonels in 1953 with Rex Harrison and Lilli Palmer.[214][221][222] For the next two years, the theater hosted Porter's musical Can-Can.[217][223][224] This was followed in 1955 by Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical Pipe Dream,[217][225][226] one of the team's less successful ventures.[227] Next, the Theatre Guild presented Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Jule Styne's musical Bells Are Ringing in 1956, featuring Judy Holliday and Sydney Chaplin;[214][228] it ran for two years,[229] relocating only because of a booking conflict.[230] Afterward, A Majority of One opened in 1959 with Gertrude Berg and Cedric Hardwicke,[214][231][232] and Bob Merrill's musical Take Me Along opened the same year.[214][233][234]

1960s to 1980s

The theater as seen at dusk
The theater as seen at dusk

In 1962, the Shubert hosted the musical I Can Get It for You Wholesale,[214][235][236] which marked both Barbra Streisand's first Broadway show and Harold Rome's final large Broadway musical.[237] The same year, David Merrick produced Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse's musical Stop the World – I Want to Get Off at the Shubert.[237][238][239] Next was the Meredith Willson musical Here's Love, which opened in 1963 with Janis Paige and Craig Stevens,[240][241][242] but it was not as successful as Willson's previous hits.[237] Also in 1963, to celebrate Shubert Alley's 50th anniversary, the Shubert family embedded a plaque in a corner of the Shubert Theatre.[16][243] Newley and Bricusse had another hit at the Shubert in 1965, The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd.[240][244][245] The Shubert next presented Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick's The Apple Tree, a set of three one-act musicals, in 1966.[246][247][248]

The Shubert hosted its first Tony Awards in 1967,[249][250] an occasion for which the surrounding stretch of 44th Street was covered in carpeting.[250][251] The theater also hosted the 1968 Tony Awards.[252] The musical Golden Rainbow, originally scheduled to open at the Shubert in November 1967,[253] instead premiered the following February with Marilyn Cooper, Eydie Gormé, and Steve Lawrence.[254][255][256] The Neil Simon musical Promises, Promises opened that December with Jerry Orbach,[257][258] setting a house record with 1,281 performances over the next three years.[259][260] This was followed in 1973 by Hugh Wheeler and Stephen Sondheim's musical A Little Night Music, featuring Glynis Johns, Len Cariou, and Hermione Gingold.[254][261][262] The next year, the Shubert hosted the musical Over Here! with two Andrews Sisters, John Travolta, and Treat Williams,[254][263][264] as well as the 1974 Tony Awards.[265][266]

Edward Albee's play Seascape opened at the Shubert with Deborah Kerr and Barry Nelson in January 1975,[267][268][269] followed that April by W. Somerset Maugham's play The Constant Wife with Ingrid Bergman.[267][270][271] Joseph Papp and the Public Theater relocated their production of the musical A Chorus Line from off-Broadway to the Shubert Theatre in October 1975.[272][273] The show's relocation increased Broadway theater attendance from 6.6 million to 7.3 million in one year,[274] and the musical itself ultimately stayed for more than a decade, winning a Pulitzer Prize for Drama.[275] During the run of Chorus Line, the Shubert hosted Tony Awards ceremonies in 1976,[276] 1977,[277] 1978,[278] 1979,[279] and 1985.[280] Chorus Line became the longest-running Broadway show in 1983,[281][282] and it became the first Broadway show to run for 5,000 performances in 1987.[283] The Shubert hosted a memorial service for Chorus Line's choreographer Michael Bennett shortly after the musical's 5,000th performance.[284]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started considering protecting the Shubert as a landmark in 1982,[285] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[286] The LPC designated the Shubert's facade and interior as landmarks on December 15, 1987.[48] This was part of the LPC's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[287] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[288] The Shubert Organization, the Nederlander Organization, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Shubert, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[289] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[290]

1990s to present

By early 1990, A Chorus Line was no longer profitable for Papp,[291] and the show ended that April after 6,137 performances.[275][292][293] The popular West End musical Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story was then booked for the Shubert,[294] and the theater was closed for renovations during much of 1990.[282] The Buddy Holly Story opened that November[295][296] and ran for 225 performances,[297] much shorter than its West End appearance.[282] The next hit at the Shubert was the George and Ira Gershwin musical Crazy for You, which opened in February 1992[298][299] and lasted 1,622 performances through January 1996.[300][301] During this time, the theater also hosted memorial services for performers such as Helen Hayes in 1993[302] and Jessica Tandy in 1994.[303] The theater was then renovated again for $3.7 million, with its technical systems being updated.[304] Next was the musical Big, which opened in April 1996[305][306] and had 192 performances.[307]

A revival of the musical Chicago relocated to the Shubert in February 1997[308][309] and remained until January 2003, when the show moved to the Ambassador Theatre.[308][310] A tribute to lyricist Adolph Green was hosted at the theater in late 2002, near the end of Chicago's run there.[311] The Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim musical Gypsy then opened in May 2003,[312][313] running at the Shubert for a year.[314] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2003, the Shuberts agreed to improve disabled access at their 16 landmarked Broadway theaters, including the Shubert.[315][316] This was followed by a dance special, Forever Tango, in the latter half of 2004.[317][318] The theater's next hit was the musical comedy Spamalot, which opened in 2005[319][320] and ran for nearly four years.[321][322] It was succeeded by a three-month revival of Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit in 2009.[323][324] Yet another long-running show opened at the Shubert in October 2009: David Bryan and Joe DiPietro's musical Memphis,[325][326] which lasted for 1,166 performances through 2012.[327][328] During Memphis's run, three shows ran for one night each: Brigadoon in 2010, Camelot in 2011, and Oliver! in 2012.[31]

Tim Minchin's West End hit Matilda the Musical opened at the Shubert in April 2013[329][330] and ran for 1,554 performances through the beginning of 2017.[331] Subsequently, the Shubert staged a revival of Hello Dolly! with Bette Midler from April 2017 to August 2018.[332][333] Hello, Dolly! achieved the box office record for the Shubert Theatre, grossing US$2,403,482 over eight performances for the week ending October 22, 2017.[334] Aaron Sorkin's play To Kill a Mockingbird opened in December 2018[335] and ran until March 12, 2020, when the theater was closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[336] The Shubert reopened on October 5, 2021, with To Kill A Mockingbird,[337][338] which closed in January 2022.[339][340] The Shubert's next booking, a limited run of the farce POTUS, opened in April 2022.[341][342] It will be followed by the musical Some Like It Hot in December 2022.[343][344]

Notable productions

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ According to theatrical historian Ken Bloom, alternate opening dates of September 29, October 28, and September 3 are listed.[99] However, contemporary media refer to the Forbes-Robertson reception being on September 29 and the first show on October 2.[97][98]
  2. ^ Hamlet, Mice and Men, The Light That Failed, Caesar and Cleopatra, The Passing of the Third Floor Back, The Sacrament of Judas, The Merchant of Venice, Othello[345]
  3. ^ Hamlet, Twelfth Night, The Taming of the Shrew[352]
  4. ^ Hamlet, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, The Merchant of Venice, The Taming of the Shrew, King Richard III, King Lear, As You Like It, Julius Caesar[364]
  5. ^ The Yeomen of the Guard, The Pirates of Penzance, The Mikado, Princess Ida, Trial by Jury, H.M.S. Pinafore, Ruddigore, Iolanthe[387]
  6. ^ a b c d This production was a special or limited run that took place during the longer run of another show

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Shubert Theatre". Shubert Organization. October 19, 1975. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  4. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 298. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  5. ^ a b c "222 West 45 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved November 17, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Forbes-Robertson Reception To-day; Famous English Actor and Wife to be Honored at New Shubert Theatre". The New York Times. September 29, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  8. ^ a b "The Shubert Theater on 44th Street and the Booth Theater on 45th Street, New York". Architecture and Building. Vol. 45. W.T. Comstock Company. November 1913. p. 467.
  9. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  10. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 37.
  11. ^ a b "Shuberts Buy Sites of Four of Their Theaters: Get Broadhurst, Plymouth, Shubert and Booth Land From W. W. Astor Estate". New York Herald Tribune. November 10, 1948. p. 14. ProQuest 1335171969.
  12. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 10, 1948). "Shuberts Acquire 4 Broadway Sites; Purchase Choice Theatre Plots From William Astor Estate for Reported $3,500,000". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  13. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 37; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  14. ^ Morrison 1999, p. 103.
  15. ^ a b c "New Theatre Moves to Times Square; Site Adjoining the Hotel Astor Chosen for the New Building -- To be Ready in 1912". The New York Times. March 18, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  16. ^ a b c Calta, Louis (October 3, 1963). "50 Years Marked in Shubert Alley; The Shuberts' Celebrated Alley Observes a Birthday". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  17. ^ "Shubert Alley Celebrates 50th". The Journal News. October 2, 1963. p. 35. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  18. ^ a b Chach 2014, p. 46.
  19. ^ a b c "The Booth and the Shubert Theatres". Architecture. Vol. 28. 1913. p. 111.
  20. ^ a b c d "Two More Playhouses: Work Begun on New Theatres in West 44th and 45th Streets". New-York Tribune. May 27, 1912. p. 3. ProQuest 574907446.
  21. ^ Morrison 1999, p. 105.
  22. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 86.
  23. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 37; Morrison 1999, p. 103.
  24. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 15–16.
  25. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  26. ^ "H. B. Herts Dead; Noted Architect; His Invention of Arch Design for Theatres Eliminated Balcony Pillars". The New York Times. March 28, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  27. ^ a b c d e f "New Shubert Theatre: Description of Playhouse to Open With Forbes-Robertson". New-York Tribune. September 28, 1913. p. B6. ProQuest 575116917.
  28. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  29. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  30. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 2, 1913). "Shubert Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c d "Sam S. Shubert Theatre (1913) New York, NY". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  32. ^ a b c Morrison 1999, p. 87.
  33. ^ a b Hirsch 2000, p. 106.
  34. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89.
  35. ^ a b c American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 965).
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 20.
  37. ^ a b American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 961).
  38. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  39. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 35.
  40. ^ a b Chach 2014, p. 48.
  41. ^ American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 963).
  42. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 20–21.
  43. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 21.
  44. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 20.
  46. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 19–20.
  47. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  48. ^ a b New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Dolkart, Andrew S.; Postal, Matthew A. (2009). Postal, Matthew A. (ed.). Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1.
  49. ^ The Reform Advocate. 1913. p. 174.
  50. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 20–21.
  51. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 21.
  52. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 22.
  53. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 21–22.
  54. ^ American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 967).
  55. ^ "Architecture and Building". Vol. 45. W.T. Comstock Company. November 1913. p. 467. {{cite magazine}}: Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  56. ^ Robinson, Ruth (August 14, 1979). "A Shop That Says: Regards to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  57. ^ a b c "Two New Theatres in the Times Square District". The New York Times. May 27, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  58. ^ a b c Hirsch 2000, p. 95.
  59. ^ Hirsch 2000, p. 100.
  60. ^ Hirsch, Foster (October 25, 1998). "Theater; When Broadway Was Ruled by the House of Shubert". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  61. ^ a b Viagas, Robert (September 29, 2013). "Broadway's Shubert Theatre Turns 100 Sept. 29". Playbill. Retrieved February 10, 2022.
  62. ^ a b c Ferris, John (March 29, 1942). "Shuberts Control Half Of New York Stages: Lee and J. J. Who Share Bank Account Have Little Competition as Theatrical Landlords There, Since Most. Other Theaters Are in Hands of Independent Producers". The Hartford Courant. p. A6. ProQuest 559613057.
  63. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (September 25, 1985). "Shubert Archive Sorts Treasures of the Stage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  64. ^ Hirsch 2000, p. 224.
  65. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (March 10, 1954). "Milton Shubert Quits His Office; Head of Theatrical Firm and Heir of Lee Said to Have Ended Ties With J. J." The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  66. ^ Hirsch 2000, p. 225.
  67. ^ Schumach, Murray (March 30, 1974). "Shubert Executives Are Sued by State". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  68. ^ Riedel, Michael (August 28, 1996). "Godfather of Broadway dies". New York Daily News. p. 40. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  69. ^ Hirsch 2000, p. 274.
  70. ^ Witchel, Alex (April 12, 1998). "Theater; A Broadway Survivor Returns for More". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  71. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  72. ^ "Theater District –". New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  73. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  74. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  75. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  76. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 208.
  77. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 9.
  78. ^ a b Stagg 1968, p. 75.
  79. ^ "Samuel S. Shubert Buried; Short and Simple Services Held for the Theatrical Manager". The New York Times. May 15, 1905. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  80. ^ "Ames's Playhouse in Times Square; Former Director of New Theatre May Build in 46th Street Smallest Theatre in City". The New York Times. September 9, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  81. ^ "Founders Abandon the New Theatre; Decide After Razing Buildings in West 44th Street It Would Not Be Wise to Build". The New York Times. December 21, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  82. ^ "New Theatre Abandoned: Founders Believe It Unwise to Proceed With Enterprise Had Bought New Site Founders Opened First Playhouse in 1909, and Many New Plays Were Produced There". New-York Tribune. December 21, 1911. p. 7. ProQuest 574855982.
  83. ^ a b c "Two Theatres on New Theatre Site; Shubert and Ames Get Large Plot in West 44th Street, Back of Hotel Astor". The New York Times. April 2, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  84. ^ a b "Senator Williams, Lecturer". New-York Tribune. April 2, 1912. p. 7. ProQuest 574913550.
  85. ^ "The Amusement Week in New York: Up and Down Broadway". The Billboard. Vol. 24, no. 20. May 18, 1912. p. 20. ProQuest 1031437440.
  86. ^ a b c d Chach 2014, p. 47.
  87. ^ "New Theaters for New York: Last Year's Record Not Quite Equalled a Now Shubert House and One for Winthrop Ames "the Lure" and "the Fight" Continue in Limelight". The Hartford Courant. September 12, 1913. p. 7. ProQuest 556023582.
  88. ^ Gray, Christopher (July 3, 2014). "Shubert Alley: Star-Gazing, but Maybe Not on Mondays". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  89. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  90. ^ "Theatres". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 90, no. 2313. July 13, 1912. p. 76 – via columbia.edu.
  91. ^ "Theatres". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 90, no. 2317. August 10, 1912. p. 213 – via columbia.edu.
  92. ^ Chach 2014, pp. 47–48.
  93. ^ "Forbes Robertson's Plans". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 24, 1913. p. 12. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  94. ^ a b Chach 2014, p. 49.
  95. ^ "Greet Forbes-Robertson; Actor Says His Retirement Soon Is Due to Money Made in America". The New York Times. September 30, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  96. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  97. ^ a b "A Great "Hamlet" Dedicates Shubert". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 3, 1913. p. 7. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  98. ^ a b "Warm Welcome for Forbes-Robertson; Repeats His Exquisitely Sensitive Performance of "Hamlet" in New Shubert Theatre". The New York Times. October 3, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  99. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 232.
  100. ^ "Sentiment Names New York's Newest Theatre". The Evening World. October 4, 1913. p. 10 – via Library of Congress.
  101. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  102. ^ "Whimsical History by English Players; Forbes-Robertson and Gertrude Elliott Repeat "Caesar and Cleopatra" with Added Act". The New York Times. October 21, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  103. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 232; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  104. ^ "Mackaye Play Is Rich in Romance; Beautifully Staged and Acted, It Provides Unusual Entertainment". The New York Times. January 7, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  105. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 232; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  106. ^ The Broadway League (March 30, 1914). "The Belle of Bond Street – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Belle of Bond Street (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1914)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  107. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  108. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 3, 1915). "Trilby – Broadway Play – 1915 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Trilby (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1915)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  109. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (April 4, 1915). "An All-star "Trilby"; Paul M. Potter's Play Revived with Mr. Lackaye and Miss Neilson-Terry in the Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  110. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 232; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 81; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  111. ^ ""Alone at Last" Has Much Charm: Franz Lehar's New Work Given Premiere at Shubert". New-York Tribune. October 20, 1915. p. 9. ProQuest 575512155.
  112. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 15, 1917). "Love o' Mike – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Love O' Mike (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1917)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  113. ^ "New Musical Play Smartly Staged; "Love o' Mike" a Mildly Amusing but Tuneful Successor to "Very Good, Eddie"". The New York Times. January 16, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  114. ^ "'Maytime' Scores at the Shubert; "Wie einst im Mai" Successfully De-hyphenized in Book and Music". The New York Times. August 17, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  115. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 16, 1917). "Maytime – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Maytime (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1917)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  116. ^ "'The Copperhead,' New Thomas Play; A Secret Service Tale of the Civil War Retold as a Drama". The New York Times. February 19, 1918. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  117. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 81; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  118. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 4, 1918). "Sometime – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Sometime (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1918)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  119. ^ "'Sometime' Comes, With Ed Wynn; Musical Comedy of Commerce, with Book and Lyrics by Rida Johnson Young". The New York Times. October 5, 1918. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  120. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 232; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 81; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  121. ^ "Sothern-Marlowe to Return to Stage Oct. 6; Begin Four Weeks' Engagement at the Shubert with a Revival of "Twelfth Night."". The New York Times. September 24, 1919. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  122. ^ "Sothern And Marlowe Return To Broadway: Audience Welcomes Their Appearance in Stellar Role of "Twelfth Night" at Shubert Theatre". Women's Wear. Vol. 19, no. 83. October 7, 1919. p. 11. ProQuest 1666210112.
  123. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 15, 1920). "The Blue Flame – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Blue Flame (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  124. ^ The Broadway League (April 12, 1921). "The Trial of Joan of Arc – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
    "The Trial of Joan of Arc (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1921)". Playbill. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  125. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 232; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 30–32.
  126. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 232; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  127. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 20, 1923). "Artists and Models [1923] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Artists and Models [1923] (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1923)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  128. ^ "Artists and Models' in Scant Adornment; Folis Bergere and Casino de Paris Ensembles Imitated in New Revue at the Shubert". The New York Times. August 21, 1923. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  129. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 232; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  130. ^ The Broadway League (November 25, 1924). "The Magnolia Lady – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
    "The Magnolia Lady (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  131. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  132. ^ Young, Stark (January 12, 1925). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  133. ^ Hammond, Percy (August 19, 1925). "The Theaters: Messrs. Shubert Present Another Revue Entitled, Naughtily, "Gay Parce" Winnie Lightner". New York Herald Tribune. p. 12. ProQuest 1112831104.
  134. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 18, 1926). "Countess Maritza – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Countess Maritza (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1926)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  135. ^ "Countess Maritza" Produced". The New York Times. September 19, 1926. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  136. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 232; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  137. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  138. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (January 26, 1927). "The Play; Wholesome Musical Comedy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  139. ^ "'Padlocks' to Close; Texas Guinan, Denying Financial Troubles, Says She Will Open Club". The New York Times. September 23, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  140. ^ "Laurette Taylor in "The Furies."". The New York Times. February 20, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  141. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82.
  142. ^ "'Ups-a-Daisy' Aided by Talented Cast; Gensler's Musical Comedy Concerned With Pretended Mountain Climber". The New York Times. October 9, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  143. ^ "New Revue for Shubert; "A Night in Venice" to Open Here in Week of May 20". The New York Times. May 8, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  144. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  145. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 17, 1929). "The Street Singer – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Street Singer (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  146. ^ "'The Street Singer' Has Pleasing Tunes; Lively Variant of Cinderella in Musical Comedy With Andrew Tombes and Queenie Smith". The New York Times. September 18, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  147. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (March 27, 1930). "The Play; Pleasantries Concerning Shakespeare". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  148. ^ "From Chicago". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 25, 1930. p. 19. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  149. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  150. ^ "'Meet My Sister' Is Novel Music Show; Newcomer at Shubert Boasts Absence of Chorus and Presence of Walter Slezak". The New York Times. December 31, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  151. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  152. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 13, 1931). "Everybody's Welcome – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Everybody's Welcome (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  153. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (October 14, 1931). "The Play; A Revival at Yiddish Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  154. ^ Martin, John (October 16, 1932). "The Dance: a New Field in the Theatre; Revue Numbers of the Early Season Make A Wide Appeal -- Notes and Comment". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  155. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 83; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  156. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 29, 1932). "Gay Divorce – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Gay Divorce (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  157. ^ "Gay Divorce' for London; Lee Ephraim Sails After Getting British Rights of Musical Show". The New York Times. April 19, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  158. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 233.
  159. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 83; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  160. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 26, 1934). "The Play; Walter Huston in Sidney Howard's 'Dodsworth,' Dramatized From Sinclair Lewis's Novel". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  161. ^ "Dodsworth' Opens Again; Play Closed for Seven Weeks Starts Run at Shubert". The New York Times. August 21, 1934. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  162. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 24, 1934). "Dodsworth – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Dodsworth (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  163. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 25, 1936). "The Play; Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne Appearing in Sherwood's 'Idiot's Delight.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  164. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 83; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  165. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 10, 1936). "Pulitzer Laurels; R.E. Sherwood's 'Idiot's Delight' Receives The Annual Award". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  166. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 24, 1936). "Idiot's Delight – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Idiot's Delight (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  167. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 9, 1937). "The Play; Maxwell Anderson's 'The Masque of Kings' Under Guild Management-Opening of 'Be So Kindly'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  168. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 83; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  169. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 8, 1937). "The Masque of Kings – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Masque of Kings (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  170. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 1937). "Babes in Arms – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Babes in Arms (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  171. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 15, 1937). "The Play; ' Babes in Arms' With a Book by Rodgers and Hart and a Cast of Youngsters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  172. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 1, 1937). "Amphitryon 38 – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Amphitryon 38 (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  173. ^ Atkinson, Brookd (November 2, 1937). "The Play; Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne Return in the Theatre Guild's 'Amphitryon 38'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  174. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 11, 1938). "I Married an Angel – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "I Married an Angel (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  175. ^ "News of the Stage; ' I Married an Angel' Due Tonight at the Shubert--'I'd Rather Be Right' Moves May 23, Kortner for Miss Cornell's Cast Summer Hits Broadway". The New York Times. May 11, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  176. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 29, 1939). "The Play; Katharine Hepburn Appearing in Philip Barry's 'The Philadelphia Story' for the Theatre Guild". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  177. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84.
  178. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 28, 1939). "The Philadelphia Story – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Philadelphia Story (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  179. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  180. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  181. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 4, 1940). "Higher and Higher – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Higher and Higher (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  182. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 5, 1940). "The Play; Jack Haley Renews Broadway Acquaintances in Rodgers and Hart's 'Higher and Higher'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  183. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 11, 1940). "Hold on to Your Hats – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Hold on to Your Hats (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  184. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 12, 1940). "The Play; 'Hold On to Your Hats' Brings Al Jolson Back to Broadway After an Absence of Nine Years". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  185. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 233; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  186. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 1941). "The Doctor's Dilemma – Broadway Play – 1941 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Doctor's Dilemma (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  187. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 12, 1941). "The Play; Cornell and Massey Appear in a Revival of Bernard Shaw's 'The Doctor's Dilemma'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  188. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 14, 1942). "The Rivals – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Rivals (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  189. ^ "Guild to Present 'Rivals' Tonight; Shubert Theatre to Be Setting for 167-Year-Old Comedy by Richard Sheridan". The New York Times. January 14, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  190. ^ a b The Broadway League (June 3, 1942). "By Jupiter – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "By Jupiter (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  191. ^ "Tonight's Openings: 'By Jupiter,' Starring Ray Bolger, at the Shubert; 'Starlight' in Harlem". The New York Times. June 3, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  192. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  193. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 1943). "Othello – Broadway Play – 1943 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Othello (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  194. ^ Nichols, Lewis (October 20, 1943). "The Play in Review; 'Othello,' With Robeson in Title Role, Revived by Theatre Guild Before an Enthusiastic Audience at the Shubert". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  195. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 2, 1944). "Catherine Was Great – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Catherine Was Great (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  196. ^ Zolotow, Sam (August 2, 1944). "Mae West Play Due Here Tonight; 'Catherine Was Great,' Written by Star, to Open at Shubert Under Mike Todd's Aegis". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  197. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 5, 1944). "Bloomer Girl – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Bloomer Girl (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  198. ^ Zolotow, Sam (October 5, 1944). "Premiere Tonight of 'Bloomer Girl'; Musical Comedy of Gay Doings in 1861 to Open at Shubert -- Celeste Holm in Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  199. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 234; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  200. ^ Calta, Louis (January 21, 1947). "Opening Tonight of 'Sweethearts'; Paula Stone and Her Husband, Michael Sloane, Will Present Bobby Clark in Revival". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  201. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 21, 1947). "Sweethearts – Broadway Musical – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Sweethearts (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  202. ^ Zolotow, Sam (September 10, 1947). "Closing on Sept. 27 for 'Sweethearts'; Revival Starring Bobby Clark to Clock 288 Performances -- London Show to Shubert". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  203. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 84; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  204. ^ Zolotow, Sam (June 17, 1949). "High Button Shoes' Will Close July 2; Musical Leaving the Broadway After 727 Performances -Proser, Kiphess Sponsors". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  205. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 9, 1947). "High Button Shoes – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "High Button Shoes (Broadway, New Century Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  206. ^ Funke, Lewis (October 17, 1948). "RIALTO GOSSIP; 'High Button Shoes' Moves to Another Theatre and Cuts Prices -- Items". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  207. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 8, 1948). "Anne of the Thousand Days – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Anne of the Thousand Days (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  208. ^ Zolotow, Sam (December 8, 1948). "Anderson Drama Arrives Tonight; ' Anne of Thousand Days,' With Rex Harrison, Joyce Redman, Opening at the Shubert". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  209. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 1949). "I Know My Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "I Know My Love (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  210. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 3, 1949). "First Night at the Theatre; Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne Return in S. N. Behrman's 'I Know My Love.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  211. ^ "A Plaque for Shubert Alley". New York Herald Tribune. June 14, 1949. p. 19. ProQuest 1326792316.
  212. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 30, 1948). "Kiss Me, Kate – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Kiss Me, Kate (Broadway, New Century Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  213. ^ Shanley, J. p (July 17, 1951). "'Kiss Me, Kate' Run to End Next Week; Musical Leaving Shubert July 28 After 1,077 Performances --Opened Dec. 30, 1948 'Fledermaus' Issue Settled New Production Group". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  214. ^ a b c d e f g Bloom 2007, p. 234; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 85; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  215. ^ a b c The Broadway League (November 12, 1951). "Paint Your Wagon – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Paint Your Wagon (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  216. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 12, 1951). "'Paint Your Wagon' Will Open Tonight; Collaborators on New Musical, Which Stars James Barton, Worked on 'Brigadoon'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  217. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 85; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 38.
  218. ^ Shanley, J. P. (July 19, 1952). "Wagon' to Leave Shubert Tonight; Loewe-Lerner Musical Play, Put on by Crawford, to Quit After 289 Performances". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  219. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 17, 1952). "The Millionairess – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Paint Your Wagon (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  220. ^ Zolotow, Sam (October 17, 1952). "Broadway Awaits Hepburn Tonight; Her Limited Run at Shubert in Shaw's 'The Millionairess' Finds Few Unsold Tickets". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  221. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 15, 1953). "The Love of Four Colonels – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
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  340. ^ Paulson, Michael (January 12, 2022). "'Mockingbird,' Once a Broadway Smash, to Pause Production Amid Omicron". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  341. ^ a b The Broadway League. "POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
    "POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  342. ^ a b Green, Jesse (April 27, 2022). "Review: In a Gleeful 'POTUS,' White House Enablers Gone Wild". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 27, 2022.
  343. ^ a b The Broadway League. "Some Like It Hot – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
    "Some Like It Hot (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. May 15, 2020. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
  344. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (April 20, 2022). "'Some Like It Hot' Musical Plans Fall Opening on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
  345. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  346. ^ The Broadway League (December 24, 1914). "To-Night's the Night – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "To-night's the Night (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1914)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (April 29, 1916). "If I Were King – Broadway Play – 1916 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "If I Were King (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1916)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  348. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  349. ^ The Broadway League (March 19, 1917). "Eileen – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Eileen (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1917)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  350. ^ The Broadway League (December 6, 1916). "Her Soldier Boy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Her Soldier Boy (Broadway, Astor Theatre, 1916)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  351. ^ The Broadway League (February 18, 1918). "The Copperhead – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Copperhead (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1918)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  352. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (March 13, 1922). "The Hotel Mouse – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Hotel Mouse (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1922)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  354. ^ The Broadway League (May 21, 1923). "Blossom Time – Broadway Musical – 1923 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Blossom Time (Broadway, Ambassador Theatre, 1921)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  355. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  356. ^ The Broadway League (January 10, 1925). "Othello – Broadway Play – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Othello (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (March 2, 1925). "Sky High – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Sky High (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  358. ^ The Broadway League (March 23, 1925). "Beggar on Horseback – Broadway Play – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Beggar on Horseback (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  359. ^ The Broadway League (April 13, 1925). "Princess Ida – Broadway Musical – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Princess Ida (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  360. ^ The Broadway League (November 9, 1927). "And So To Bed – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "And So to Bed (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  361. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  362. ^ The Broadway League (November 28, 1927). "Harry Delmar's Revels – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Harry Delmar's Revels (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  363. ^ The Broadway League (October 10, 1927). "The Five O'Clock Girl – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Five O'Clock Girl (Broadway, 44th Street Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  364. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  365. ^ The Broadway League (September 16, 1930). "Symphony in Two Flats – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Symphony in Two Flats (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  366. ^ The Broadway League (October 30, 1930). "The Last Enemy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Last Enemy (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  367. ^ The Broadway League (April 8, 1931). "Peter Ibbetson – Broadway Play – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Peter Ibbetson (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  368. ^ The Broadway League (August 30, 1932). "Smiling Faces – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Smiling Faces (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  369. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  370. ^ The Broadway League (January 21, 1935). "Escape Me Never – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Escape Me Never (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  371. ^ The Broadway League (December 2, 1935). "Rosmersholm – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Rosmersholm (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  372. ^ The Broadway League (February 24, 1936). "Love on the Dole – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "Love on the Dole (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  373. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  374. ^ The Broadway League (March 28, 1938). "The Seagull – Broadway Play – 1938 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
    "The Seagull (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  375. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  376. ^ The Broadway League (December 25, 1940). "Pal Joey – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Pal Joey (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  377. ^ The Broadway League (October 22, 1941). "Candle in the Wind – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Candle in the Wind (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  378. ^ The Broadway League (April 27, 1942). "Candida – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Candida (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  379. ^ The Broadway League (June 29, 1943). "The Vagabond King – Broadway Musical – 1943 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Vagabond King (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  380. ^ The Broadway League (November 10, 1945). "Are You With It? – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Yours Is My Heart (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  381. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  382. ^ The Broadway League (November 4, 1946). "Park Avenue – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Park Avenue (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  383. ^ The Broadway League (October 3, 1947). "Under the Counter – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Under the Counter (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  384. ^ The Broadway League (November 5, 1947). "The First Mrs. Fraser – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The First Mrs. Fraser (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  385. ^ The Broadway League (December 16, 1948). "Lend an Ear – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Lend an Ear (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  386. ^ The Broadway League (October 1, 1951). "Jose Greco Ballet – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Jose Greco Ballet (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  387. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 38.
  388. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 1955). "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (Broadway, Belasco Theatre, 1955)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  389. ^ The Broadway League (May 13, 1954). "The Pajama Game – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Pajama Game (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1954)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  390. ^ The Broadway League (December 22, 1958). "Whoop-Up – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Whoop-Up (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  391. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 39.
  392. ^ The Broadway League (April 14, 1960). "Bye Bye Birdie – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Bye Bye Birdie (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  393. ^ The Broadway League (November 18, 1961). "The Gay Life – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Gay Life (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1961)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  394. ^ The Broadway League (January 6, 1963). "Oliver! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Oliver! (Broadway, Imperial Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  395. ^ The Broadway League (November 23, 1964). "Bajour – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Bajour (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  396. ^ The Broadway League (November 30, 1965). "Inadmissible Evidence – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Inadmissible Evidence (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  397. ^ The Broadway League (May 3, 1966). "Ivanov – Broadway Play – 1966 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Ivanov (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  398. ^ The Broadway League (February 2, 1966). "Wait Until Dark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Wait Until Dark (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  399. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 40.
  400. ^ The Broadway League (April 30, 1972). "An Evening With Richard Nixon and... – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "An Evening with Richard Nixon and... (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  401. ^ The Broadway League (November 30, 1972). "The Creation of the World and Other Business – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Creation of the World and Other Business (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  402. ^ The Broadway League (December 20, 1972). "The Sunshine Boys – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  403. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 235; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 88.
  404. ^ "A Wonderful Life (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  405. ^ "Brigadoon (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  406. ^ "Camelot (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  407. ^ "Oliver! (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  408. ^ The Broadway League. "To Kill a Mockingbird". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "To Kill A Mockingbird (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.

Sources

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 26 July 2022, at 16:20
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