To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Sevenoaks railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sevenoaks National Rail
Sevenoaks Station - geograph.org.uk - 1255766.jpg
The station in 2009
Location
PlaceSevenoaks
Local authorityDistrict of Sevenoaks
Grid referenceTQ522553
Operations
Station codeSEV
Managed bySoutheastern
Number of platforms4
DfT categoryB
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 4.060 million
– Interchange Decrease 0.356 million
2014/15Increase 4.138 million
– Interchange Increase 0.411 million
2015/16Increase 4.139 million
– Interchange Increase 0.868 million
2016/17Increase 4.160 million
– Interchange Decrease 0.410 million
2017/18Decrease 4.154 million
– Interchange Decrease 0.386 million
History
Key datesOpened 2 March 1868 (2 March 1868)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Sevenoaks from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Sevenoaks railway station is on the South Eastern Main Line in England, serving the town of Sevenoaks, Kent. It is 22 miles 9 chains (35.6 km) down the line from London Charing Cross and is situated between Dunton Green and Hildenborough stations. Trains calling at the station are operated by Southeastern and Thameslink.

Trains from the station run northbound to London Bridge, Cannon Street, Waterloo East and Charing Cross via Orpington, or to Blackfriars via Swanley and Catford; and southbound to Ashford International and Ramsgate via Dover Priory, or Tunbridge Wells and Hastings.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/5
    Views:
    910
    2 845
    39 436
    16 143
    790
  • ✪ Trainspotting at Sevenoaks, SEML - 18/11/17 [TSE S4E13]
  • ✪ Sevenoaks Station, Kent
  • ✪ Sevenoaks station gets summer makeover #AmazingJourneys
  • ✪ Eurostars at Sevenoaks 1994 to 2001
  • ✪ Thameslink Class 319 Ride: Bickley to Sevenoaks - 27/04/17

Transcription

Contents

History

Sevenoaks railway station was opened on 2 March 1868. It was formerly known as "Tubs Hill", after the adjacent area. There is a second station, on the branch to Swanley Junction, which opened on 2 June 1862. The station is named after the Bat & Ball local inn which is now closed, and serves the north end of the town.

The two lines to Sevenoaks were electrified in January 1935. When the station was reconstructed in the 1970s a new ticket office was built replacing the old wooden S.E.R. building. The largest version of the Southern Region D70 type glass box station, this reconstruction was designed by regional architect Nigel Wikeley.[1] Two additional side platforms were also abolished.

Sevenoaks is part of the rail franchise which, post-privatisation, was served by Connex South Eastern. Subsequent to their 'sacking' in 2003 due to poor financial management (although their train operating performance had been very poor), services were operated by South Eastern Trains, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Strategic Rail Authority (SRA). On 1 April 2006, Southeastern, owned by Govia, took over management of the station as part of the new Integrated Kent Franchise.

Accidents

7 June 1884 - A double-headed freight train ran into the rear of another freight train at Tub's Hill station. Both crew of the first train were killed. The Hildenborough signalman was charged with causing their deaths. The trains were being worked under the time interval system.[2]

24 August 1927 - the Sevenoaks railway accident. River class tank locomotive No. 800 River Cray derailed at Shoreham Lane between Dunton Green and Sevenoaks. Thirteen people were killed and 20 were injured. The locomotives were withdrawn and rebuilt as tender locomotives.

Services

The view from platform 3 at Sevenoaks, looking south towards Tonbridge with a Thameslink train operating on behalf of Southeastern
The view from platform 3 at Sevenoaks, looking south towards Tonbridge with a Thameslink train operating on behalf of Southeastern

As of the August 2016 timetable off-peak services from this station from Monday to Friday are:

Platforms

There are two island platforms - 1 & 2, and 3 & 4.

  • Platform 1- Northbound fast trains (through Dunton Green) fast to London Bridge, Waterloo East, London Charing Cross and London Cannon Street
  • Platform 2- Slow trains starting/terminating at Sevenoaks (through Dunton Green) to London Charing Cross and London Cannon Street via Orpington and Lewisham
  • Platform 3- Southbound trains via Tonbridge (destinations are Tunbridge Wells, Hastings, Ashford International, Canterbury and Ramsgate).
  • Platform 4- Thameslink trains (through Bat & Ball) which all start/terminate here.

During the peak period there are fast direct services to London Cannon Street.

Preceding station
National Rail
National Rail
Following station
Dunton Green   Southeastern
South Eastern Main Line
  Hildenborough
Orpington   Southeastern
Hastings Line
  Tonbridge
Bat & Ball   Thameslink
Thameslink
  Terminus

Passenger Representation

The not-for-profit Sevenoaks Rail Travellers' Association (SRTA) corresponds and meets with Southeastern Railway, TfL, the DfT, MPs and other relevant parties to represent the interests of passengers using Sevenoaks and stations nearby – Bat & Ball, Dunton Green, Eynsford, Kemsing, Otford, and Shoreham. [3]

References

  1. ^ Lawrence, David (2018). British Rail Architecture, 1948-97 (First ed.). Manchester, UK: Crecy Publishing Ltd. p. 144. ISBN 978-0-86093-685-5.
  2. ^ Jewell, Brian (1984). Down the line to Hastings. Southborough: The Baton Press. ISBN 0-85936-223-X.
  3. ^ http://www.sevenoakschronicle.co.uk/Sevenoaks-train-group-slams-Southeastern-s/story-19925773-detail/story.html

External links

This page was last edited on 18 September 2019, at 13:01
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.