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Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders
SWB RailRiders logo.svg
SWBRailRiderscap.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassTriple-A (1989–present)
LeagueInternational League (2022–present)
DivisionEast Division
Previous leagues
Major league affiliations
TeamNew York Yankees (2007–present)
Previous teamsPhiladelphia Phillies (1989–2006)
Minor league titles
Class titles (1)
  • 2016
League titles (2)
  • 2008
  • 2016
Division titles (13)
  • 1992
  • 1999
  • 2002
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2012
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • 2019
Wild card berths (3)
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2018
Team data
NameScranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders (2013–present)
Previous names
  • Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees (2007–2012)
  • Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons (1989–2006)
ColorsNavy blue, cranberry, gold, white
       
MascotCHAMP[1]
BallparkPNC Field (2013–present)
Previous parks
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Diamond Baseball Holdings (subsidary of Silver Lake)
General managerKatie Beekman[1]
ManagerDoug Davis

The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders (often abbreviated to SWB RailRiders) are a Minor League Baseball team of the International League (IL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the New York Yankees. They are located in Moosic, Pennsylvania, in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area, and are named in reference to Northeastern Pennsylvania being home to the first trolley system in the United States. The RailRiders have played their home games at PNC Field since its opening in 1989.

Founded as members of the International League in 1989, the team was known as the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons during their affiliation with the Philadelphia Phillies from 1989 to 2006. They became known as the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees in 2007 after affiliating with the New York Yankees. They rebranded as the RailRiders in 2013. The RailRiders became members of the Triple-A East in 2021, but this league was renamed the International League in 2022.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre has won two International League championships (2008 and 2016) and one Triple-A National Championship (2016).

History

Prior professional baseball in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area

Professional baseball teams first played in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (SWB) area of Pennsylvania in the late 19th century. In Scranton, the predominant moniker of these teams was the Scranton Miners, who originated in 1886 as the Scranton Indians, though they were also known as Coal Heavers and Red Sox throughout their history.[2] The Miners' last season was in 1953 as members of the Eastern League.[2] The franchise was surrendered to the league after it was unable to secure backing by a Major League Baseball team for 1954.[3] In Wilkes-Barre, the Wilkes-Barre Barons, originally the Coal Barons, who were established in 1886, played their last season in the Eastern League in 1955.[4] Financial problems resulted in the relocation of the franchise to Johnstown during the 1955 season.[5]

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons (1989–2006)

Over three decades after Minor League Baseball left the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area, the Maine Phillies were relocated from Old Orchard Beach, Maine, to Lackawanna County in 1989.[6] A group from Scranton, called Northeast Baseball, Inc. (NBI), purchased the team in 1987. The previous owner tried to renege on the sale, but after a lengthy court battle, NBI won control of the franchise and moved forward with its relocation.[6] The team was renamed the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons in reference to the Scranton Red Sox and the Wilkes-Barre Barons, who had preceded them.[2][4][6] They were to play in the International League (IL) as the Triple-A affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies, as had the franchise in Maine.[6] Their home ballpark was the newly-constructed Lackawanna County Stadium, later renamed PNC Field, located in nearby Moosic, Pennsylvania.[7]

A green baseball field surrounded by navy blue seats with three light towers high above
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre has played at PNC Field, formerly Lackawanna County Stadium, since 1989.

The Red Barons struggled in their early years, finishing under .500 in their first three seasons.[2] In 1992, manager Lee Elia led SWB to an 84–58 record and the Eastern Division title.[8][9] In the playoffs, they defeated the Pawtucket Red Sox in the semifinals but lost the league championship versus the Columbus Clippers.[9] The Red Barons posted losing records for the next six seasons.[2]

Marc Bombard took over as manager in 1997 and led the club to four consecutive postseason appearances from 1999 to 2002.[10] The 1999 Northern Division champion Red Barons were eliminated from the playoffs in the semifinals by the Charlotte Knights.[11] In 2000, the team missed winning the division but qualified for the IL wild card spot. They defeated the Buffalo Bisons in the semifinals but fell to the Indianapolis Indians in the championship round. [12] Another wild card berth in 2001 sent SWB back to the playoffs. They won the semifinals over Buffalo, 3–2, and advanced to face the Louisville RiverBats for the league title.[13] After losing Game One of the series, the postseason came to abrupt end when it was cancelled in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks.[14] Louisville, with a 1–0 series lead, was declared the champion.[14] The Red Barons returned to the playoffs in 2002 with the Northern Division title but were eliminated by Buffalo in the semifinals.[15] They made one more postseason appearance as the Red Barons and as a Phillies affiliate in 2006 via a division title win, but the Rochester Red Wings ended their championship hopes in the semifinals.[16]

Following the 2006 season, the Philadelphia Phillies ended their affiliation with the Red Barons and signed a player development contract with the Ottawa Lynx in anticipation of that team's move to Allentown's new Coca-Cola Park as the Lehigh Valley IronPigs for the 2008 season.[17]

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees (2007–2012)

A man in gray baseball pants and a navy blue top swinging a bat at a baseball in a batting cage
The SWB Yankees taking batting practice before a game in 2009

In 2007, the club became the Triple-A affiliate of the New York Yankees and rebranded as the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees.[2][17] In terms of regular-season records and championships, the Yankees affiliation has been more successful than that with the Phillies. From 2007 to 2009, the SWB Yankees made four consecutive trips to the postseason, all by virtue of winning the Northern Division title. The 2007 team was eliminated in the semifinal round by the Richmond Braves.[18] In 2008, the Yankees won another division title with an 88–56 record behind manager Dave Miley.[19][20] After defeating Pawtucket in the semifinals, 3–1, the Yankees beat the Durham Bulls, 3–1, in the final round to earn the Governors' Cup, their first IL championship.[19] This qualified them for the Bricktown Showdown, a single game against the Pacific Coast League's champion to determine an overall champion of the Triple-A classification. They lost the Triple-A championship versus the Sacramento River Cats by a score of 4–1.[21] SWB won the 2009 semifinals over the Gwinnett Braves, 3–1, but were swept by Durham in the finals, 3–0.[22] The 2010 team was eliminated by Columbus in the semifinals.[23]

In November 2010, the Lackawanna County Multipurpose Stadium Authority voted to sell the SWB Yankees to Mandalay Baseball Properties, which planned a $40-million renovation of PNC Field.[24] However, negotiations stalled the actual sale for over a year.[25] The sale was finalized on April 26, 2012, with the franchise being sold to SWB Yankees LLC, an ownership entity that was a joint venture between the New York Yankees and Mandalay.[26]

Empire State Yankees

The SWB Yankees chose to temporarily relocate their operations for the 2012 season to allow major renovations to PNC Field to be completed in one season, rather than being spread over two to three years. The team based itself in Rochester, New York, at Frontier Field, home of Red Wings.[27] They played their entire schedule on the road, often being designated as the home team at an opponent's ballpark. In addition to Frontier Field, the Yankees also played home games at Dwyer Stadium in Batavia, New York; Alliance Bank Stadium in Syracuse, New York; Coca-Cola Field in Buffalo, New York; Coca-Cola Park in Allentown, Pennsylvania; and McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.[28] The team was known as the Empire State Yankees in the 2012 season for promotional purposes, though it retained its official SWB Yankees moniker.[29] After missing the playoffs in 2011, the Yankees returned in 2012 by winning the Northern Division title, but they were eliminated by Pawtucket in the semifinals.[30]

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders (2013–present)

In anticipation of their return to the renovated PNC Park in 2013, a name-the-team contest was launched to select a new moniker for the SWB franchise. Among the finalists were "Blast", "Black Diamond Bears", "Fireflies", "Porcupines", and "Trolley Frogs".[31] The chosen name, "RailRiders", is in reference to Northeastern Pennsylvania being home to the first trolley system in the United States.[32] Although RailRiders received the most first-place votes by fans, Porcupines received the most overall fan votes on the ballots ranked one through three. As a result, a porcupine was incorporated in the RailRiders' logos.[33]

The 2013 and 2014 RailRiders finished under .500 and did not qualify for the postseason.[2] In September 2014, Mandalay Baseball Properties sold its 50% interest in the team to SWB Investors LLC for an estimated $13 to $15 million. The New York Yankees retained their 50% ownership of the team.[34]

The RailRiders returned to the playoffs in 2015 with a Northern Division title win, but they were swept out of the semifinals by Indianapolis.[35] After nine seasons, six division titles, and one league championship, the 2015 season was the last for Dave Miley as the team's manager.[20]

Men in white baseball uniforms with navy pinstripes hugging and celebrating on a baseball field
The RailRiders celebrating winning the 2016 Triple-A National Championship Game

Al Pedrique was hired to lead the team in 2016.[36] SWB finished with a league-best 91–52 record and another Northern Division title. They swept Lehigh Valley, 3–0, in the semifinals and won their second Governors' Cup over Gwinnett, 3–1.[37] The IL championship qualified them for the Triple-A National Championship Game versus the El Paso Chihuahuas, where they won, 3–1, claiming their second Triple-A championship.[38]

The 2017 RailRiders won the division title and defeated Lehigh Valley in the semifinals but lost the IL championship to Durham.[39] The 2018 club made another postseason run via a wild card berth. Like in the previous season, they advanced to the finals by beating Lehigh Valley but again lost in the finals to Durham.[40] The RailRiders finished the 2019 season tied for first place with the Syracuse Mets, each with a 75–65 record. On September 3, SWB defeated Syracuse in a one-game playoff, 14–13, to win the Northern Division title.[41] They were, however, swept in the playoff semifinals by Durham.[42] The start of the 2020 season was initially postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic before being cancelled altogether.[43][44]

In conjunction with Major League Baseball's restructuring of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the RailRiders were organized into the Triple-A East.[45] No playoffs were held to determine a league champion; instead, the team with the best regular-season record was declared the winner.[46] SWB placed third in the league standings with a 68–49 record.[47] However, 10 games that had been postponed from the start of the season were reinserted into the schedule as a postseason tournament called the Triple-A Final Stretch in which all 30 Triple-A clubs competed for the highest winning percentage.[46] The RailRiders finished the tournament in sixth place with a 7–3 record.[48] In 2022, the Triple-A East became known as the International League, the name historically used by the regional circuit prior to the 2021 reorganization.[49]

Season-by-season records

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1989–present)
League champions League champions (1989–present)
* Division champions (1989–present)
^ Postseason berth (1992–present)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular-season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1989 IL 64–79 .448 7th 3rd 18 Philadelphia Phillies [50]
1990 IL 68–78 .466 5th 2nd 21+12 Philadelphia Phillies [51]
1991 IL 65–78 .455 7th 4th 14 Philadelphia Phillies [52]
1992
*
IL 84–58 .592 2nd 1st 5–4 .556 Won Eastern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Pawtucket Red Sox, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–2[9]
Philadelphia Phillies [53]
1993 IL 62–80 .437 8th 3rd 12+12 Philadelphia Phillies [54]
1994 IL 62–80 .437 10th 5th 16 Philadelphia Phillies [55]
1995 IL 70–72 .493 8th 4th 3 Philadelphia Phillies [56]
1996 IL 70–72 .493 5th 3rd 8 Philadelphia Phillies [57]
1997 IL 66–76 .465 8th 3rd 17+12 Philadelphia Phillies [58]
1998 IL 67–75 .472 11th 6th 13+12 Philadelphia Phillies [59]
1999
*
IL 78–66 .542 5th 1st 2–3 .400 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Charlotte Knights, 3–2[11]
Philadelphia Phillies [60]
2000
^
IL 85–60 .586 2nd 2nd 1 5–4 .556 Won wild card berth
Won semifinals vs. Buffalo Bisons, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Indianapolis Indians, 3–2[12]
Philadelphia Phillies [61]
2001
^
IL 78–65 .545 4th 2nd 13+12 3–3 .500 Won wild card berth
Won semifinals vs. Buffalo Bisons, 3–2
Lost IL championship vs. Louisville RiverBats, 1–0[a][13]
Philadelphia Phillies [62]
2002
*
IL 91–53 .632 1st 1st 0–3 .000 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Buffalo Bisons, 3–0[15]
Philadelphia Phillies [63]
2003 IL 73–70 .510 7th (tie) 3rd (tie) 9+12 Philadelphia Phillies [64]
2004 IL 69–73 .486 8th 4th 13 Philadelphia Phillies [65]
2005 IL 69–75 .479 9th (tie) 5th (tie) 13 Philadelphia Phillies [66]
2006
*
IL 84–58 .592 1st 1st 1–3 .250 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Rochester Red Wings, 3–1[16]
Philadelphia Phillies [67]
2007
*
IL 84–59 .587 1st 1st 1–3 .250 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Richmond Braves, 3–1[18]
New York Yankees [68]
2008
* League champions
IL 88–56 .611 1st (tie) 1st 6–3 .667 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Pawtucket Red Sox, 3–1
Won IL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 3–1[19]
Lost Triple-A championship vs. Sacramento River Cats[21]
New York Yankees [69]
2009
*
IL 81–60 .574 3rd 1st 3–4 .429 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Gwinnett Braves, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 3–0[22]
New York Yankees [70]
2010
*
IL 87–56 .608 2nd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–1[23]
New York Yankees [71]
2011 IL 73–69 .514 7th 3rd 8 New York Yankees [72]
2012
*
IL 84–60 .583 2nd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Pawtucket Red Sox, 3–1[30]
New York Yankees [73]
2013 IL 68–76 .472 10th 5th 12+12 New York Yankees [74]
2014 IL 68–76 .472 10th 5th 13+12 New York Yankees [75]
2015
*
IL 81–63 .563 3rd 1st 0–3 .000 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Indianapolis Indians, 3–0[35]
New York Yankees [76]
2016
* League champions Class champions
IL 91–52 .636 1st 1st 7–1 .875 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Lehigh Valley IronPigs, 3–0
Won IL championship vs. Gwinnett Braves, 3–1[37]
Won Triple-A championship vs. El Paso Chihuahuas[38]
New York Yankees [77]
2017
*
IL 86–55 .610 1st 1st 4–4 .500 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Lehigh Valley IronPigs, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 3–1[39]
New York Yankees [78]
2018
^
IL 73–65 .529 3rd 2nd 10 5–4 .556 Won wild card berth
Won semifinals vs. Lehigh Valley IronPigs, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 3–2[40]
New York Yankees [79]
2019
*
IL 76–65 .539 5th 1st 0–3 .000 Won Northern Division title[b]
Lost semifinals vs. Durham Bulls, 3–0[42]
New York Yankees [80]
2020 IL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[44] New York Yankees [81]
2021 AAAE 68–49 .581 3rd 2nd 3 7–3 .700 Lost series vs. Syracuse Mets, 3–2
Won series vs. Rochester Red Wings, 5–0
Placed 6th in the Triple-A Final Stretch[48]
New York Yankees [47]
2022 IL 83–67 .553 5th 2nd 3 New York Yankees [82]
Totals 2,496–2,196 .532 51–54 .486

Uniforms

Four baseball players wearing navy blue jerseys with white pinstriped pants standing on a baseball field
RailRiders players wearing alternate navy blue jerseys and pinstriped pants

The RailRiders' primary home uniform is white with navy blue pinstripes, mirroring those of the New York Yankees.[32] The primary home jersey features the "SWB" logo on the left chest and a navy interlocking New York Yankees "NY" logo on the right sleeve. The home cap is navy with a golden "R" set against a railroad track.[83] An alternate solid navy jersey features a white interlocking "SWB" crest on the left chest and a white interlocking New York Yankees "NY" logo on the right sleeve. These are worn with a navy cap baring the same white logo.[84]

Radio and television

SWB's first radio play-by-play announcer was Kent Westling, a former local television sportscaster who previously worked on telecasts of the St. Louis Blues hockey team. While cutting back on his schedule in later years, he retired following the 2007 season after having called over 2,000 games since the team's inaugural 1989 campaign.[85] Mike Vander Woude served as the team's second play-by-play announcer from 2008 until 2012.[86][87] He was followed by John Sadak from 2013 to 2017.[87][88] Adam Marco has been the "Voice of the RailRiders" since 2018.[89]

All RailRiders home and road games are broadcast by WICK across their five frequencies in Northeastern Pennsylvania: 1400 WICK (Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties), 1440 WCDL (Lackawanna County and Pocono Lake Region), 93.5 FM (Scranton and Northern Lackawanna County), 106.7 FM (Wayne and Pike Counties), and 107.9 FM (Lackawanna County).[89] Live audio broadcasts are also available online through the team's website and the MiLB First Pitch app.[89] All home and road games can be viewed through the MiLB.TV subscription feature of the official website of Minor League Baseball, with audio provided by a radio simulcast.[90]

Roster

Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches

  • 34 Trevor Amicone (hitting)
  •  6 Lino Diaz (defense)
  • 43 Raul Dominguez (defense)
  • 33 Graham Johnson (pitching)

60-day injured list

Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On New York Yankees 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated August 26, 2022
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • International League
New York Yankees minor league players

Awards

Eight players, five managers, and two executives have won league awards in recognition for their performance with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in the International League.[91]

International League awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player Shane Victorino 2005 [91]
Most Valuable Player Shelley Duncan 2009 [91]
Most Valuable Player Ben Gamel 2016 [91]
Most Valuable Pitcher Brandon Duckworth 2001 [91]
Most Valuable Pitcher Joe Roa 2002 [91]
Pitcher of the Year Award Greg Weissert 2022 [92]
Rookie of the Year Marlon Anderson 1998 [91]
Rookie of the Year Brandon Duckworth 2001 [91]
Rookie of the Year Austin Jackson 2009 [91]
Rookie of the Year Ben Gamel 2015 [91]
Manager of the Year Lee Elia 1992 [91]
Manager of the Year Marc Bombard 2002 [91]
Manager of the Year John Russell 2006 [91]
Manager of the Year Dave Miley 2007 [91]
Manager of the Year Dave Miley 2012 [91]
Manager of the Year Al Pedrique 2016 [91]
Manager of the Year Al Pedrique 2017 [91]
Executive of the Year Bill Terlecky 1990 [91]
Executive of the Year Josh Olerud 2017 [91]

Managers

A man in light baseball pants and a dark jersey
Ramón Avilés managed the Red Barons in 1996.
A man in a white baseball uniform with dark pinstripes
Al Pedrique managed the RailRiders from 2016 to 2017.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre has had 16 managers since their inaugural 1989 season.

No. Manager Season(s)
1 Bill Dancy 1989–1991
2 Lee Elia 1992
3 George Culver 1993
4 Mike Quade 1994–1995
5 Butch Hobson[c] 1996
6 Ramón Avilés[c] 1996
7 Marc Bombard[d] 1997–2001
8 Jerry Martin[d] 2001
Bill Dancy[d] 2001
9 Donnie Long[d] 2001
Jerry Martin[d] 2001
Marc Bombard[d] 2001–2004
10 Gene Lamont 2005
11 John Russell 2006
12 Dave Miley 2007–2015
13 Al Pedrique 2016–2017
14 Bobby Mitchell 2018
15 Jay Bell 2019
16 Doug Davis 2020–present

Ownership

The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders are owned by Diamond Baseball Holdings, a subsidiary of the investment firm Silver Lake, previously a subsidiary of Endeavor Group Holdings.[98]

Prior to the Diamond Baseball Holdings ownership, the Railriders were owned by SWB Yankees LLC, a joint venture between Yankee Global Enterprises and SWB Investors LLC and was previously a joint venture between Yankee Global Enterprises and Mandalay Baseball Properties until Mandalay sold its stake in SWB Yankees LLC to SWB Investors LLC. Yankee Global Enterprises is the owner of the RailRiders' parent club the New York Yankees and SWB Investors LLC was the local ownership group that handled the day-to-day operations of the RailRiders. The joint venture's name comes from the name SWB Yankees, an alternate name that was used by the RailRiders when they were known as the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees to distinguish themselves from their MLB affiliate, the New York Yankees. Yankee Global Enterprises and SWB Investors LLC each owned 50% in the SWB Yankees LLC joint venture, automatically gave each 50% ownership in the RailRiders. SWB Investors LLC's 50% stake in the SWB Yankees LLC joint venture was originally held by Mandalay Baseball Properties. Former MLB pitcher Andy Ashby was one of the team's owner-investors.[99]

Notes

  1. ^ The 2001 playoffs were cancelled in the wake the September 11 terrorist attacks. Louisville, which had won the first game of the series, 2–1, before its cancellation, was declared the winner.
  2. ^ SWB finished the 2019 season tied for first with the Syracuse Mets, each with a 75–65 record. On September 3, SWB defeated Syracuse in a one-game playoff, 14–13, to win the Northern Division title.[41]
  3. ^ a b Ramón Avilés served as interim manager from May 6 through the end of the season after Butch Hobson took a leave of absence from the team.[93][94]
  4. ^ a b c d e f Marc Bombard was promoted to the Philadelphia Phillies to serve as interim third base coach on May 6.[95] Red Barons hitting coach Jerry Martin served as interim manager for two days before being succeeded by Phillies field coordinator Bill Dancy and roving hitting instructor Donnie Long. Martin then came back as interim manager before Bombard returned to the team on July 14.[96][97]

References

  1. ^ a b "Front Office". Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Scranton, Pennsylvania Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  3. ^ "EL to Operate Without Scranton; Allentown In". The Evening Times. Sayre. December 15, 1953. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ a b "Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  5. ^ "Johnstown Gets Eastern Berth". Latrobe Bulletin. Latrobe. June 27, 1955. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b c d "Guides Bid Adieu to Maine, Become Red Barons in '89". Citizens' Voice. Wilkes-Barre. September 2, 1988. p. 66 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "PNC Field". Stats Crew. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  8. ^ "1992 Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons Statistics". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  9. ^ a b c "1992 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  10. ^ "Marc Bombard Minor League Baseball Coaching Records". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  11. ^ a b "1999 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  12. ^ a b "2000 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  13. ^ a b "2001 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  14. ^ a b Bennett, Brian (September 13, 2001). "International League Rules Playoffs Over". The Courier-Journal. Louisville. p. E1 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "2002 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  16. ^ a b "2006 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Red Barons are Now Yankees". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia. December 14, 2006. p. D8 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b "2007 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  19. ^ a b c "2008 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  20. ^ a b "Dave Miley". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  21. ^ a b "Sacramento River Cats (84-61) 4, Scranton-Wilkes Barre Yankees (88-57) 1" (PDF). Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 30, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  22. ^ a b "2009 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  23. ^ a b "2010 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  24. ^ "SWB Yankees, LLC Welcome Stadium Authority Decision on Renovation". Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. Minor League Baseball. November 10, 2010. Retrieved September 15, 2022.
  25. ^ Reichard, Kevin (February 27, 2012). "Sale Still Pending for SWB Yankees; Could Team Depart". Ballpark Digest. Retrieved September 15, 2022.
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External links

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