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Scheduled monuments in Lancashire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Roman baths at Ribchester
Roman baths at Ribchester
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML

This is a list of scheduled monuments in the English county of Lancashire.

In the United Kingdom, a scheduled monument is a "nationally important" archaeological site or historic building that has been given protection against unauthorised change by being placed on a list (or "schedule") by the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; Historic England takes the leading role in identifying such sites.[1] Scheduled monuments are defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983. There are about 20,000 scheduled monument entries on the list, which is maintained by Historic England; more than one site can be included in a single entry.

While a scheduled monument can also be recognised as a listed building, Historic England considers listed building status as a better way of protecting buildings than scheduled monument status. If a monument is considered by Historic England to "no longer merit scheduling" it can be descheduled.[2]

Lancashire has over 140 scheduled monuments including burial mounds, Roman remains, medieval sites, mining relics, castles and various bridges.

Image Name Feature Location District Notes
Ashnott lead mine and lime kiln Mining Newton

53°55′42″N 2°28′09″W / 53.9283°N 2.4691°W / 53.9283; -2.4691 (Ashnott lead mine and lime kiln)

Ribble Valley Located on a limestone knoll at Ashnott Farm. Lead mining occurred here in periods from at least the 1300s upto the 19th century. There are earthwork and buried remains of the surface workings, mine shafts and dams built to supply water to the site. The listing also includes a single-pot lime kiln, possibly built here to make use of waste rock from the mine.[3]
Askew Heights
Askew Heights
Askew Heights prehistoric enclosure Enclosure Quernmore

54°03′19″N 2°43′25″W / 54.0552°N 2.7236°W / 54.0552; -2.7236 (Askew Heights univallate prehistoric defended enclosure and hollow way)

Lancaster A univallate (single-walled) defended enclosure c.70 metres (230 ft) across, surrounded by an approximately 11-metre (36 ft) ditch, with entrances in the north and south. Located on a hilltop overlooking the Lune valley, there is also a deep hollow way ascending the hill, thought to be a track to the site.[4]
Barrow Scout, Warton Crag
Barrow Scout, Warton Crag
Badger Hole, Warton Crag Cave Warton

54°08′56″N 2°47′41″W / 54.1489°N 2.7947°W / 54.1489; -2.7947 (Badger Hole, Warton Crag)

Lancaster A cave about 20 metres (66 ft) up the west face of Warton Crag, overlooking Morecambe Bay. Excavations have revealed evidence of human occupation dating back to the Paleolithic period.[5]
Bailey Hall and chantry of St John the Baptist Moated site Aighton, Bailey and Chaigley

53°49′52″N 2°29′24″W / 53.8311°N 2.4900°W / 53.8311; -2.4900 (Bailey Hall moated site)

Ribble Valley The late 16th-century Bailey Hall is situated on a moated site of an earlier building. Next to the hall are the ruins of the early 14th-century chantry chapel dedicated to St John the Baptist. This is the only moated site in Lancashire known to have contained a parochial chapel. The listing does not include the hall, but does include two hollows to the west, thought to have been fishponds.[6]
Beadle Hill Romano-British farmstead Settlement Briercliffe

53°48′11″N 2°10′08″W / 53.8031°N 2.1689°W / 53.8031; -2.1689 (Beadle Hill Romano-British farmstead)

Burnley Located at the western end of Beadle Hill, with extensive views over the surrounding area. Inner and outer ditches are separated by an earth and stone rampart, around a farmstead enclosure about 75 metres (246 ft) square, with an entrance on the eastern side.[7]
Carters big kiln North tunnel
Carters big kiln North tunnel
Bellmanpark lime kilns and tramway Kilns Clitheroe

53°53′10″N 2°22′07″W / 53.8861°N 2.3685°W / 53.8861; -2.3685 (Bellmanpark lime kilns)

Ribble Valley NW of Bellman Farm are the remains of lime kilns and associated short tramway, next to the Chatburn to Blackburn railway line. James Carter and William Rowe opened the limeworks in c.1869. A bank of four massive lime kilns up to 15 metres (49 ft) high. Built in 1877 from limestone blocks with brick arches, each kiln is lined with firebricks. Served by a chain-driven tramway from Bellmanpark quarry, small trucks ran across a large wooden trestle bridge to the top of the kilns. The kilns unloaded directly into the wagons which passed through the base of the structure. Little work continued at the site after 1960.[8][9]
Bleara Lowe round cairn Cairn Earby

53°54′17″N 2°06′47″W / 53.9046°N 2.1131°W / 53.9046; -2.1131 (Bleara Lowe round cairn)

Pendle Located on the summit of Bleara Moor, on the border with North Yorkshire, the round cairn is thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 21-metre (69 ft) by 19-metre (62 ft) oval mound of peat and heather-covered stones up to 1.4 metres (4 ft 7 in) high, with a 0.4-metre (1 ft 4 in) deep, rectangular hollow, 3 metres (9.8 ft) by 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) on the top.[10]
Bleasdale Circle
Bleasdale Circle
Bleasdale Circle Henge Bleasdale

53°54′30″N 2°38′43″W / 53.9084°N 2.6452°W / 53.9084; -2.6452 (Bleasdale Circle)

Wyre On a flat hilltop between the tributary streams of the River Brock. A grave and cremation urns were found in the central mound, around which 11 oak posts formed a ring approximately 11 metres (36 ft) across. The Bronze Age urnfield was enclosed by a ditch and a palisaded timber ring c.50 metres (160 ft) in diameter.[11]
Boar's Den
Boar's Den
Boar's Den bowl barrow Burial mound Wrightington

53°35′42″N 2°43′48″W / 53.5949°N 2.7301°W / 53.5949; -2.7301 (Boar's Den bowl barrow)

West Lancashire A bowl barrow thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. It is a 66.5-metre (218 ft) by 62-metre (203 ft) oval mound of earth and stones between 1.8–2.5 metres (5 ft 11 in–8 ft 2 in) high. Located to the south of Boar's Den Farm.[12]
Bomber Camp Romano-British farmstead and associated enclosure Settlement Bracewell and Brogden

53°55′28″N 2°14′26″W / 53.9245°N 2.2406°W / 53.9245; -2.2406 (Bomber Camp Romano-British farmstead)

Pendle Fourth century farmstead within an enclosure c.70 metres (230 ft) square, surrounded by a ditch with innner and outer banks, which are still visible. The entrance was on the south east side and two raised areas inside are believed to be hut platforms.[13] It is north of the roman road from Ribchester to Ilkley (Margary 72a / RR 72a).[14]
Two Bowl barrows at Hacking[a] Burial mound Aighton, Bailey and Chaigley

53°49′52″N 2°26′40″W / 53.8312°N 2.4444°W / 53.8312; -2.4444 (Bowl barrow 170m north east of Hacking Boat House) 53°49′57″N 2°26′51″W / 53.8325°N 2.4475°W / 53.8325; -2.4475 (Bowl barrow 250m north of Hacking Boat House)

Ribble Valley On the flood plain, north of the River Ribble, close to its confluence with the Calder, 170 metres (560 ft) NE and 250 metres (820 ft) north of Hacking Boat House are two bowl barrows thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. Both oval mounds of earth, the easterly is the more prominent, at up to 6 metres (20 ft) high and 44 by 35 metres (144 by 115 ft) across. The westerly barrow is larger at 60 by 35 metres (197 by 115 ft) wide and up to 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) high. An archaeological excavation in 1894 has left an approximately 9-metre (30 ft) diameter, 1.7-metre (5 ft 7 in) deep hollow at the centre of the westerly barrow.[15][16]
Two Bowl barrows east of Beadle Hill[a] Burial mound Briercliffe

53°48′11″N 2°09′59″W / 53.8030°N 2.1663°W / 53.8030; -2.1663 (Bowl barrow 140m east of Beadle Hill) 53°48′12″N 2°09′58″W / 53.8032°N 2.1660°W / 53.8032; -2.1660 (Bowl barrow 155m east of Beadle Hill)

Burnley Located 140 metres (460 ft) and 155 metres (509 ft) east of Beadle Hill, are two bowl barrows thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. The turf-covered, circular mounds of earth and small stones are surrounded by an approximately 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) wide shallow ditch, which is unusual in Lancashire. The westerly is the larger, at 9.5 metres (31 ft) diameter and 0.1-metre (3.9 in) high. The easterly is 8.5 metres (28 ft) wide and a similar height.[17][18]
Twist Castle bowl barrow Burial mound Briercliffe

53°47′59″N 2°10′08″W / 53.7996°N 2.1688°W / 53.7996; -2.1688 (Bowl barrow 90m east of Twist Castle)

Burnley 90 metres (300 ft) east of the Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead is a bowl barrow thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. It is a 13.7-metre (45 ft) circular mound, constructed of earth and small stones to a height of up to 0.3 metres (1 ft 0 in). In 1889, an intact ceramic food vessel was recovered from the centre of the barrow.[19]
Two Bowl barrows near Brown Hills Beck[a] Burial mound Gisburn Forest & Easington

54°02′19″N 2°22′26″W / 54.0386°N 2.3738°W / 54.0386; -2.3738 (Bowl barrow west of Brown Hills Beck) 54°02′15″N 2°22′24″W / 54.0376°N 2.3733°W / 54.0376; -2.3733 (Bowl barrow east of Brown Hills Beck)

Ribble Valley In the forest on either side of Brown Hills Beck, are two bowl barrows thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. Both oval mounds of earth, the easterly is the larger, at 40 by 30 metres (131 by 98 ft) and up to 10 metres (33 ft) high. The smaller westerly barrow is 25 by 15 metres (82 by 49 ft) wide and up to 8 metres (26 ft) high. The are no records to suggest that either has ever been excavated.[20][21]
Bowl barrow, Hameldon Pasture
Bowl barrow, Hameldon Pasture
Bowl barrow on Hameldon Pasture Burial mound Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood

53°47′23″N 2°09′59″W / 53.7898°N 2.1663°W / 53.7898; -2.1663 (Bowl barrow on Hameldon Pasture)

Burnley On Hameldon Pasture is a bowl barrow thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. It is an up to 0.5-metre (1 ft 8 in) high, oval mound 21.5 by 17 metres (71 by 56 ft), constructed of earth and small stones. At the barrow's centre, there is a 0.3-metre (1 ft 0 in) deep hollow, approximately 5 by 4 metres (16 by 13 ft),containing two gritstone boulders. These, along with another boulder a short distance away, are thought to be the remains of a stone cist, which was opened in 1886 but found to be empty.[22]
Bradley Hall Moated site Eccleston

53°38′57″N 2°42′41″W / 53.6491°N 2.7113°W / 53.6491; -2.7113 (Bradley Hall, moated site, fishponds and connecting channels)

Chorley Moated site with fishponds connected by water channels. Moated sites were typically built between 1250-1350.[23]
Bretters Farm moated site and two fishponds[24] Moated site Heath Charnock

53°38′01″N 2°36′27″W / 53.6336°N 2.6076°W / 53.6336; -2.6076 (Bretters Farm moated site and two fishponds)

Chorley
Packhorse bridge at Brooks Farm, Bleasdale
Packhorse bridge at Brooks Farm, Bleasdale
Brooks Farm packhorse bridge Bridge Bleasdale

53°54′23″N 2°39′43″W / 53.9065°N 2.6620°W / 53.9065; -2.6620 (Brooks Farm packhorse bridge)

Wyre Packhorse bridge over the River Brock, south of Brooks Farm.[25]
Burscough Priory Ruins
Burscough Priory Ruins
Burscough Priory Building Burscough

53°34′58″N 2°51′24″W / 53.5828°N 2.8567°W / 53.5828; -2.8567 (Burscough Priory)

West Lancashire The Augustinian priory here was dedicated to St Nicholas and established in c.1190 by Robert Fitz Henry (Lord of Lathom and Knowsley). The building was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries between 1536 and 1541.[26]
Burwains Camp
Burwains Camp
Burwains Camp prehistoric defended settlement Settlement Briercliffe

53°48′48″N 2°08′59″W / 53.8132°N 2.1497°W / 53.8132; -2.1497 (Burwains Camp prehistoric defended settlement west of Broad Bank Hill)

Burnley A circular univallate (single-walled) defended enclosure c.45 metres (148 ft) across, surrounded by a ditch and bank, with entrances in the east and west. Today the 0.3-metre (1 ft 0 in) wide ditch is only approximately 0.2 metres (7.9 in) deep and the bank no more than 0.3 metres (1 ft 0 in) high and about 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) across. The site is located on Broad Bank Hill, overlooking the valley of Thursden Brook. Thought to be a prehistoric settlement, limited archaeological excavation in 1950 recovered some Neolithic finds but was insufficient to more accurately date the site.[27]
Camp House moated site, moated outwork and connecting channels[28] Moated site Hornby-with-Farleton

54°06′08″N 2°39′22″W / 54.1022°N 2.6561°W / 54.1022; -2.6561 (Camp House moated site, moated outwork & connecting channels)

Lancaster
Castercliff small multivallate hillfort Fort Nelson

53°50′30″N 2°10′35″W / 53.8417°N 2.1764°W / 53.8417; -2.1764 (Castercliff small multivallate hillfort)

Pendle A small multivallate hillfort is located on a hilltop overlooking the valley system of the River Calder and its tributaries, on the edge of the South Pennines. Thought to date from the Iron Age, triple rubble ramparts up to 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) high, separated by ditches of similar depth, surround the site on all sides except the north. The inner rampart may have been timber-laced and revetted with stone and enclosed an oval area measuring approximately 115 by 76 metres (377 by 249 ft). The hillfort has been damaged by coal mining with old bell pits evident both inside and around the site.[29]
Site of Castle Haugh
Site of Castle Haugh
Castle Haugh Ringwork Castle Newsholme

53°57′10″N 2°15′38″W / 53.9528°N 2.2606°W / 53.9528; -2.2606 (Castle Haugh Ringwork)

Ribble Valley On high ground overlooking the River Ribble, are the remains of a late Anglo-Saxon or early Norman ringwork castle. A circular earth mound 5–6 metres (16–20 ft) high survives, topped by a breastwork, and largely surrounded by a 2-metre (6 ft 7 in) deep ditch. It is called Castle Haugh but also known locally as Cromwell's Basin.[30]
Site of Penwortham Castle
Site of Penwortham Castle
Castle Hill motte Castle Penwortham

53°45′21″N 2°43′21″W / 53.7558°N 2.7226°W / 53.7558; -2.7226 (Castle Hill motte)

South Ribble Next to St Mary's Church, the earth mound survives of the motte-and-bailey Penwortham Castle, situated here overlooking an ancient ford across the River Ribble. Its diameter is approximately 36.5 metres (120 ft) at the base and 7.6 metres (25 ft) at the summit. The castle was named in the Domesday Book, but appears to have fallen into ruins during the 13th century.[31]
Castle Hill, Halton
Castle Hill, Halton
Castle Hill motte and bailey, Halton[32] Castle Halton-with-Aughton

54°04′36″N 2°45′58″W / 54.0767°N 2.7661°W / 54.0767; -2.7661 (Castle Hill motte and bailey, Halton)

Lancaster
Castle Hill motte, Dolphinholme Castle Ellel

53°58′35″N 2°43′57″W / 53.9764°N 2.7326°W / 53.9764; -2.7326 (Castle Hill motte, Dolphinholme)

Lancaster Overlooking the River Wyre, an earth mound survives, about 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) high and 20 metres (66 ft) maximum diameter, partially destroyed by a neighbouring 19th-century quarry. Known as Castle Hill, this was the site of a medieval motte castle, although little is known of its history.[33][34]
Castle Hill prehistoric defended enclosure[35] Castle Leck

54°11′45″N 2°32′15″W / 54.1959°N 2.5374°W / 54.1959; -2.5374 (Castle Hill prehistoric defended enclosure)

Lancaster
Castle Mound motte and bailey, Melling[36] Castle Melling-with-Wrayton

54°08′05″N 2°36′57″W / 54.1347°N 2.6157°W / 54.1347; -2.6157 (Castle Mound motte and bailey, Melling)

Lancaster
Entrance to the motte and bailey castle
Entrance to the motte and bailey castle
Castle Stede motte and bailey, Hornby Castle Hornby-with-Farleton

54°07′19″N 2°38′23″W / 54.1220°N 2.6397°W / 54.1220; -2.6397 (Castle Stede motte and bailey, Hornby)

Lancaster Overlooking Loyn Bridge across the River Lune, the earth mound and sections of the ditches survive of the motte-and-bailey Castle Stede. It is one of a group of similar castles established along the Lune valley in the late 11th century. It is the best preserved example of this type of castle in Lancashire. On the south side of the site, the scheduling also includes a World War II pill box, constructed on the outer edge of the bailey ditch.[37]
Chapel Hill Motte
Chapel Hill Motte
Chapel Hill Motte, Arkholme Castle Arkholme-with-Cawood

54°07′19″N 2°38′23″W / 54.1220°N 2.6397°W / 54.1220; -2.6397 (Chapel Hill Motte, Arkholme)

Lancaster Next to St John's Church, the earth mound survives of the motte-and-bailey Arkholme Castle, situated here overlooking an ancient ford across the River Lune. It is one of a group late 11th-century castles established along the Lune valley, with the church sited within the former bailey.[38]
Chingle Hall
Chingle Hall
Chingle Hall moated site Moated site Whittingham

53°49′00″N 2°40′29″W / 53.8167°N 2.6746°W / 53.8167; -2.6746 (Chingle Hall moated site)

Preston The early 17th-century Chingle Hall is situated on a moated site of an earlier building thought to date from the medieval period. The approximately 44-by-40-metre (144 by 131 ft) rectangular island, was surrounded by an up to 10-metre (33 ft) wide waterfilled moat. The moat survives best at to west and south and today is accessed by a brick-built bridge on the south side. The house and bridge are excluded from the scheduling, but are Grade II listed.[39][40]
Claughton hlaew in Sandhole Wood Burial mound Claughton

53°52′34″N 2°44′33″W / 53.8761°N 2.7424°W / 53.8761; -2.7424 (Claughton hlaew)

Wyre A 10th-century Viking burial mound in Sandhole Wood.[41]
Clintsfield Colliery Engine House
Clintsfield Colliery Engine House
Clintsfield Colliery Mining Tatham

54°07′20″N 2°34′09″W / 54.1223°N 2.5692°W / 54.1223; -2.5692 (Clintsfield Colliery)

Lancaster On the south side of the River Wenning, east of Clintsfield Farm, a colliery operated during the 18th and early 19th centuries. During its lifetime a number of shafts where constructed, with horses used for winding, and two features on the ground are thought to have been gin circles. The structures of the steam engine house, which in 1839 contained a 5 horsepower (3.7 kW) beam engine used for pumping, and also the boiler house and chimney are still standing. There are also three reservoirs with dams.[42]
Clitheroe Castle Keep
Clitheroe Castle Keep
Clitheroe Castle Castle Clitheroe

53°52′12″N 2°23′36″W / 53.8700°N 2.3934°W / 53.8700; -2.3934 (Clitheroe Castle)

Ribble Valley Early medieval enclosure castle situated on a limestone rock outcrop overlooking the River Ribble in Clitheroe. It was probably built in the twelfth century. Property of the de Lacy family. The castle site remained in private ownership until 1920. The keep is the second smallest surviving stone-built keep in England.[43]
Remains of Cockersand Abbey
Remains of Cockersand Abbey
Cockersand Abbey Building Thurnham

53°58′36″N 2°52′29″W / 53.9766°N 2.8748°W / 53.9766; -2.8748 (Cockersand Premonstratensian Abbey)

Lancaster On the Irish Sea coast between the Lune Estuary and the River Cocker are the remains of a Premonstratensian abbey, founded c.1190 and dedicated to St Mary. It closed in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and all that survives today is the restored chapter house and some ruined masonry.[44] The chapter house is also a Grade I listed building.[45]
Aushaw Moss
Aushaw Moss
Coking ovens and associated coal workings on Aushaw Moss Mining North Turton

53°40′21″N 2°24′19″W / 53.6724°N 2.4054°W / 53.6724; -2.4054 (Coking ovens and associated coal workings on Aushaw Moss)

Blackburn with Darwen The remains of Broad-head Colliery (closed 1893), including shaft mounds, gin circles, platforms and roadways. Also 8 stone built beehive coking ovens arranged in 3 banks.[46][47]
Cromwell's Mound Civil War fieldwork[48] Military Broughton

53°47′55″N 2°41′44″W / 53.7987°N 2.6955°W / 53.7987; -2.6955 (Cromwell's Mound Civil War fieldwork)

Preston
Cross Hall moated site Moated site Ormskirk

53°34′02″N 2°51′52″W / 53.5672°N 2.8645°W / 53.5672; -2.8645 (Cross Hall moated site)

West Lancashire Earthworks and buried remains of Cross Hall moated site. Cross Hall was a residence of the Stanley family.[49]
Yarrow Bridge at Croston
Yarrow Bridge at Croston
Croston Town Bridge Bridge Croston

53°39′37″N 2°46′26″W / 53.6602°N 2.7738°W / 53.6602; -2.7738 (Croston Town Bridge)

Chorley The bridge dates from 1682 and carries a road called The Hillocks over the River Yarrow. It is in sandstone, and consists of a single segmental arch with rounded coping to the parapets, and a humped deck paved with setts. It is also a Grade II listed building.[50][51]
Dog Holes Cave Cave Warton

54°09′02″N 2°47′33″W / 54.1505°N 2.7925°W / 54.1505; -2.7925 (Dog Holes Cave)

Lancaster Like Badger Hole, the cave is on the west face of Warton Crag. Similarly, excavations have revealed evidence of early human occupation, with artefacts discovered from the Neolithic, Iron Age and possibly Roman periods.[52][53]
Dovecote at Great Eccleston Building Great Eccleston

53°51′12″N 2°52′28″W / 53.8534°N 2.8744°W / 53.8534; -2.8744 (Dovecote at Great Eccleston)

Wyre A 17th-century, brick-built dovecote located 150m NE of Gradwells.[54]
Downham lime kiln and associated lime yard Kilns Downham

53°53′45″N 2°19′21″W / 53.8959°N 2.3225°W / 53.8959; -2.3225 (Downham lime kiln and associated lime yard)

Ribble Valley 50 metres (160 ft) north of Smithfield Farm is a disused single-pot, flare type lime kiln and a stone-walled storage yard. It is a rare example in north west England of such a complete commercial lime kiln site.[55]
Edisford Bridge over the River Ribble
Edisford Bridge over the River Ribble
Edisford (or Eadsford) Bridge Bridge Clitheroe & Great Mitton

53°52′07″N 2°25′04″W / 53.8685°N 2.4177°W / 53.8685; -2.4177 (Eadsford (or Edisford) Bridge)

Ribble Valley A grant of pontage was issued for a bridge over the River Ribble here in 1339. Today's sandstone bridge contains some Gothic ribbed arches possibly of late-medieval construction. It has nine spans of varying width, four arches crossing the river channel on the east side and a further five partly buried arches with a tight bend over meadow land on the west. The largest arch is the second from the eastern side at 17.98 metres (59.0 ft) across, it is thought to have replaced two earlier arches before 1799. The bridge was widened over its full length from c.2.4 metres (8 ft) to about 6.1 metres (20 ft), sometime before 1903. It is also Grade II listed.[56][57][58][59]
Earthworks in Spa Roughs Wood Earthwork Lathom

53°34′11″N 2°48′25″W / 53.5698°N 2.8070°W / 53.5698; -2.8070 (Earthworks in Spa Roughs Wood)

West Lancashire Situated 900 metres (3,000 ft) south east of the present Lathom House, the earthworks are thought to be of a moat, perhaps the site of the old house. In 1644, during the English Civil War, the site was used as a fieldwork in the siege of Lathom House by the Parliamentarians.[60]
Market Cross at Garstang
Market Cross at Garstang
Garstang market cross Cross Garstang

53°54′00″N 2°46′28″W / 53.9001°N 2.7744°W / 53.9001; -2.7744 (Garstang market cross)

Wyre Although not entirely original, the medieval market cross is still located in its original location at the Market Place in front of the Royal Oak Hotel.[61]
Glass melting and annealing workshop Building Lancaster

54°02′57″N 2°48′13″W / 54.0493°N 2.8036°W / 54.0493; -2.8036 (Glass melting and annealing workshop)

Lancaster Near Lancaster Castle, 23 Castle Hill was home to Shrigley and Hunt's stained glass manufacturing workshops. The main building, fronting Castle Hill, housed studios and workshops and was occupied by the firm from about 1890. Behind this, the cellar of another, historically larger building, previously the main workshops, contains four melting and annealing furnaces. Glassmaking ceased in the mid-20th century. The older building is scheduled, considered an outstanding and unique survival of such furnaces. The main building is Grade II listed.[62]
Glasson Dock
Glasson Dock
Glasson Dock Dockyard Thurnham

53°59′56″N 2°50′57″W / 53.9990°N 2.8491°W / 53.9990; -2.8491 (Glasson Dock) 53°59′52″N 2°50′52″W / 53.9978°N 2.8477°W / 53.9978; -2.8477 (Glasson Dock)

Lancaster Due to the difficulty of navigation up the River Lune to the docks in Lancaster, the port commission decided to build a dock at Glasson, which opened in 1787. Several additions have since been made: a link was constructed to the Glasson Branch of the Lancaster Canal in the 1820’s, a Graving Dock was built in 1837, and the East Quay was extended to accommodate the Glasson Dock branch line after 1880.[63][64] The late 18th-century lighthouse on the East Quay and former custom house on the North Quay are also Grade II listed.[65][66]
Greenhalgh Castle Ruins
Greenhalgh Castle Ruins
Greenhalgh Castle Castle Barnacre-with-Bonds

53°53′59″N 2°45′41″W / 53.8997°N 2.7615°W / 53.8997; -2.7615 (Greenhalgh Castle)

Wyre After 1490, Thomas Stanley had the castle built on the site an earlier manor house, overlooking the River Wyre. Without a defended outer enclosure, it is an unusual variant of a tower keep with elements of a quadrangular castle. During the Civil War the castle was held by the Royalists, but the garrison surrendered under siege in 1645, after which it was partially demolished. The south west tower is best preserved, standing up to 10 metres (33 ft). The scheduling also includes an area farmed terraces SE of the castle.[67]
Halsall medieval rectory Building Halsall

53°35′15″N 2°57′02″W / 53.5874°N 2.9505°W / 53.5874; -2.9505 (Halsall medieval rectory)

West Lancashire A medieval C14th or C15th priest's house (also known as Halsall Abbey or Halsall Priory) near St Cuthbert's Church. Remains of standing sandstone walls.[68]
The bombing decoy was toward the summit of Hameldon Hill
The bombing decoy was toward the summit of Hameldon Hill
Hameldon Hill World War II bombing decoy Military Hapton & Dunnockshaw and Clowbridge

53°45′05″N 2°17′27″W / 53.7515°N 2.2909°W / 53.7515; -2.2909 (Hameldon Hill World War II bombing decoy, 390m north of Heights Farm)

Burnley During World War II a network of five Starfish site bombing decoys were constructed in the area, designed to protect Accrington. This site, 390 metres (1,280 ft) north of Heights Farm, was started in early spring 1941 (during The Blitz) with two control buildings and a number of rectangular areas where fires were ignited, surrounded by firebreak trenches. In the autumn simulated urban lighting was added and the site became a joint QL/SF decoy, operating until at least March 1942. Although the control buildings have been demolished, it is one of only three such combined sites in England still remaining largely in its completed form.[69]
Hanging Stone
Hanging Stone
Hanging Stone or Watersheddles Cross Cross Laneshaw Bridge

53°50′27″N 2°02′43″W / 53.8407°N 2.0452°W / 53.8407; -2.0452 (Hanging Stone or Watersheddles Cross)

Pendle A standing cross near the Watersheddles Reservoir on the moorland border with West Yorkshire. The 1.82-metre (6 ft 0 in) long stone now rests at an angle against an outcrop, but is thought to have formerly stood upright. Likely of medieval origin, records from 1327-77 show that `Waterschedles crosse' was used to mark the boundary between the Diocese of York and that of Lichfield.[70][71]


Site of Hapton Castle
Site of Hapton Castle
Hapton Castle Castle Hapton

53°46′45″N 2°19′21″W / 53.7792°N 2.3226°W / 53.7792; -2.3226 (Hapton Castle)

Burnley Immediately east of Castle Clough gorge, are the remains of medieval castle dating back to at least 1328, when Gilbert de la Leigh purchased Hapton manor. An oval yard about 40 metres (130 ft) by 30 metres (98 ft) is thought to have been enclosed by a wooden palisade or stone wall, with a stone tower keep inside. Additional defences included a dry ditch, which survives in the south and part of the east sides up to 14 metres (46 ft) wide and 4 metres (13 ft) deep. It ceased to be the seat of the manor when Hapton Tower was built in 1510, but was still occupied in 1667. However by 1725 it was in ruins and little was left of the structure by 1800.[72]
Headless Cross at Grimeford
Headless Cross at Grimeford
Headless Cross, Grimeford Cross Anderton

53°36′44″N 2°34′39″W / 53.6122°N 2.5775°W / 53.6122; -2.5775 (Headless Cross, Grimeford)

Chorley Close to the junction of Grimeford Lane, Roscoe Lowe Brow and Rivington Lane, is the lower 1.05 metres (3 ft 5 in) of a wayside cross shaft thought to date to at least the 12th century. It is constructed of local sandstone with carvings on all sides and set on a modern base. It is topped by a post-medieval flat sandstone slab, with the words TO PRESTON, TO WIGGAN, TO BOULTON and TO BLAGBURN carved on the sides. It is also Grade II listed.[73][74]
Saxon Cross
Saxon Cross
High cross in St Peter's churchyard, Heysham Cross Heysham, Lancaster

54°02′50″N 2°54′06″W / 54.0471°N 2.9017°W / 54.0471; -2.9017 (High cross in St Peter's churchyard, Heysham)

Lancaster Close to St Patrick's Chapel, in the churchyard of St Peter's Church is the lower part of an Anglian high cross shaft thought to date to the 9th century. It is constructed of local red sandstone with carvings on all sides and 0.85 metres (2 ft 9 in) and set on a modern base.[75]
Halton Viking Cross
Halton Viking Cross
High cross in St Wilfrid's churchyard, Halton Cross Halton-with-Aughton

54°04′33″N 2°46′01″W / 54.0758°N 2.7669°W / 54.0758; -2.7669 (High cross in St Wilfrid's churchyard, Halton)

Lancaster In the churchyard of St Wilfrid's Church is a decorated pre-Norman high cross thought to date to the 11th century. Constructed of local sandstone, it is approximately 3.9 metres (13 ft) high and sits on a three-stepped stone base. However the cross has been reassembled from pieces, with only the upper arm of the cross head and the lower and upper and parts of the shaft being original.[76]
Higher Mill and Chimney
Higher Mill and Chimney
Higher Mill, Helmshore Building Helmshore

53°41′24″N 2°20′19″W / 53.6899°N 2.3386°W / 53.6899; -2.3386 (Higher Mill, Helmshore) 53°41′23″N 2°20′15″W / 53.6896°N 2.3375°W / 53.6896; -2.3375 (Higher Mill, Helmshore)

Rossendale On the River Ogden in 1789, the Turner family built a three-storey woollen fulling mill, it still retains fulling stocks and a working backshot water wheel. Next to this in the 1820s they constructed a larger mill that spans the river, which was damaged by fire and rebuilt in 1859–60 as a cotton spinning mill and warehouse. There is also a square chimney on the hillside overlooking the mill and connected to it by an underground flue. Today the buildings form the Helmshore Mills Textile Museum and are also Grade II listed.[77][78][79][80][81]
Higherford Old Bridge, Barrowford
Higherford Old Bridge, Barrowford
Higherford Old Bridge Bridge Barrowford

53°51′28″N 2°12′38″W / 53.8577°N 2.2105°W / 53.8577; -2.2105 (Higherford Old Bridge)

Pendle A stone packhorse bridge crossing Pendle Water, connecting Colne and the Forest of Pendle, consisting of a single span with voussoirs. Built around the end of 16th or early 17th century, initially without parapets, which were added in 1815. It is also a Grade II* listed building.[82][83]
Bridge over the River Wenning at Hornby
Bridge over the River Wenning at Hornby
Hornby Bridge[84] Bridge Hornby-with-Farleton

54°06′35″N 2°38′09″W / 54.1097°N 2.6359°W / 54.1097; -2.6359 (Hornby Bridge)

Lancaster It is also Grade II listed.[85]
Ice house at Towneley Hall
Ice house at Towneley Hall
Ice house at Towneley Hall Building Burnley

53°46′29″N 2°13′33″W / 53.7748°N 2.2257°W / 53.7748; -2.2257 (Ice house at Towneley Hall)

Burnley Located in the grounds of Towneley Park, west of the hall, is a disused Ice house, thought to have been built by the Towneley family during the 17th century. Repaired in 1976, it is constructed of brick and stone, covered with earth. More recently it was found that bats have roosted here, and it has become very overgrown.[86][87]
Site of Ightenhill Manor House
Site of Ightenhill Manor House
Ightenhill Manor Building Ightenhill

53°48′08″N 2°16′36″W / 53.8022°N 2.2767°W / 53.8022; -2.2767 (Ightenhill Manor)

Burnley Ightenhill was one of the manors of the Honour of Clitheroe, covering a much larger area than the civil parish. The manor house was east of Gawthorpe Hall on the brow of the hill overlooking the River Calder, the site providing a good view of Pendle Forest. The earliest known reference occurred when John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln signed a charter here in 1238. By 1296 a c.760-acre (310 ha) deer park had been enclosed around it and a horse stud established here. As well as the hall, the site contained a number of ancillary buildings including a chapel, barn and stable. It was a ruin by 1522 and by 1894 no part of the walls were still standing.[88][89]
Ingrave Farm moated site, moated site[90] Moated site Eccleston

53°39′29″N 2°44′20″W / 53.6580°N 2.7389°W / 53.6580; -2.7389 (Ingrave Farm moated site, moated site 100m W of Ingrave Farm and connecting channel, Eccleston)

Chorley 100m West of Ingrave Farm and connecting channel, Eccleston
Length of Roman road N of Bateson's Farm Transport Bowland Forest Low

53°54′54″N 2°29′31″W / 53.9149°N 2.4920°W / 53.9149; -2.4920 (Length of Roman road N of Bateson's Farm)

Ribble Valley Around Cow Ark, a minor road follows parts of the line of the Roman road north from Ribchester fort (Margary 7c / RR 7c), the two deviating at Browsholme Heights. The exposed section of the Roman road at this junction is protected by an entry on the schedule.[91][92]
Little Painley bowl barrow Burial mound Horton

53°56′49″N 2°15′46″W / 53.9469°N 2.2629°W / 53.9469; -2.2629 (Little Painley bowl barrow)

Ribble Valley Covered by trees on a small hill east of the River Ribble, north of its confluence with Stock Beck, is a bowl barrow thought to date from the Late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. The approximately 0.5-metre (1 ft 8 in) high and 20-metre (66 ft) wide, circular mound of earth and stones is surrounded by an approximately 2.5-metre (8 ft 2 in) wide ditch up to 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in) deep. Traces remain of an outer bank that flanked the ditch, about 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) wide and up to 0.3 metres (1 ft 0 in) high.[93]
Loyn Bridge over the River Lune
Loyn Bridge over the River Lune
Loyn Bridge Bridge Gressingham & Hornby-with-Farleton

54°07′18″N 2°38′29″W / 54.1217°N 2.6415°W / 54.1217; -2.6415 (Loyn Bridge)

Lancaster A three-arch sandstone bridge over the River Lune, possibly dating to the late medieval period, located next to Castle Stede. It is also a Grade II* listed building.[94][95]
Moated site at Bolton-by-Bowland Moated site Bolton-by-Bowland

53°56′27″N 2°20′50″W / 53.9407°N 2.3472°W / 53.9407; -2.3472 (Moated site 50m NE of Holden Green Farm)

Ribble Valley In the hamlet of Holden, 50 metres (160 ft) NE of Holden Green Farm, is a moated site thought to date from the medieval period. Today a grassy island, approximately 43 by 36 metres (141 by 118 ft), is surrounded by a c.8-metre (26 ft) wide dry moat. The foundations of buildings formerly on the island are indicated by an L-shaped bank on the northern half, and a raised platform at the SE corner. It was accessed by a causeway across the mid-point of the western arm of the moat.[96]
Moated site and fishponds[97] Moated site Priest Hutton

54°09′38″N 2°42′42″W / 54.1606°N 2.7116°W / 54.1606; -2.7116 (Moated site and fishponds E of Upp Hall Farm)

Lancaster East of Upper Hall Farm
Moated site and two fishponds Moated site Much Hoole

53°41′37″N 2°47′59″W / 53.6935°N 2.7998°W / 53.6935; -2.7998 (Moated site and two fishponds south of Manor House Farm)

South Ribble South of Manor House Farm.[98]
Moated site at Bickerstaffe Hall Moated site Bickerstaffe

53°31′45″N 2°50′28″W / 53.5293°N 2.8411°W / 53.5293; -2.8411 (Moated site at Bickerstaffe Hall)

West Lancashire The moated site of the original Bickerstaffe Hall.[99]
Clayton Hall
Clayton Hall
Moated site of Clayton Hall, adjacent fishponds and channels Moated site Clayton-le-Woods

53°41′35″N 2°39′39″W / 53.6930°N 2.6609°W / 53.6930; -2.6609 (Moated site of Clayton Hall, adjacent fishponds and channels)

Chorley The, now demolished, 17th-century Clayton Hall is situated on a moated site thought to date from the medieval period. The waterfilled moat survives best at its north and NE sides and access was by a causeway at the NW corner. To the north and west are two fishponds connected to the moat and also included in the scheduling.[100]
Moated site of Scarisbrick Hall Moated site Scarisbrick

53°36′30″N 2°55′20″W / 53.6083°N 2.9221°W / 53.6083; -2.9221 (Moated site of Scarisbrick Hall)

West Lancashire The moated site of the original Scarisbrick Hall, located 140 metres (460 ft) NW of the modern Scarisbrick Hall.[101]
Northern part of Rimington lead mines[102] Mining Rimington

53°54′06″N 2°17′05″W / 53.9016°N 2.2848°W / 53.9016; -2.2848 (Rimington lead mines, part of a medieval open field system and three limestone clamp kilns)

Ribble Valley Part of a medieval open field system and three limestone clamp kilns

120m SE of Hollins

Oak Mount Mill, Wiseman Street
Oak Mount Mill, Wiseman Street
Oak Mount Mill engine and engine house Building Burnley

53°47′24″N 2°15′07″W / 53.7899°N 2.2520°W / 53.7899; -2.2520 (Oakmount Mill)

Burnley Oak Mount Mill on Wiseman Street, next to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal, was originally built in 1830. Its stationary steam engine by W & J Yates of Blackburn was installed in a new engine house after a fire in the 1880s, continuing to power the mill until its closure in 1979. It was restored by the Weavers' Triangle Trust in 2001, who offer occasional demonstrations.[103][104] The engine house is also a Grade II listed building.[105][106]
Old Lower Hodder Bridge
Old Lower Hodder Bridge
Old Lower Hodder Bridge Bridge Aighton, Bailey and Chaigley & Great Mitton

53°50′52″N 2°27′04″W / 53.8478°N 2.4512°W / 53.8478; -2.4512 (The Old Lower Hodder Bridge)

Ribble Valley A disused sandstone bridge over the River Hodder, built in 1562, also known as Cromwell's Bridge. It about 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) wide has three segmental arches, the middle being widest, and was replaced by another bridge a little way upstream in 1819. On 16th August 1648, Oliver Cromwell held a council of war here while his 8,000-strong army passed over the bridge on the eve of the Battle of Preston. It is also Grade II* listed.[107][108][109]
Roman bath-house, Lancaster
Roman bath-house, Lancaster
Part of a Roman fort and a Benedictine priory on Castle Hill Fort Lancaster

54°03′05″N 2°48′21″W / 54.0514°N 2.8057°W / 54.0514; -2.8057 (Castle Hill, Lancaster)

Lancaster Lancaster Castle was not the first building on Castle Hill. A Roman fort was founded here c. 80 AD, probably to command a crossing point on the River Lune. Re-built and expanded a number of times, around 330 AD the fort underwent a drastic remodelling in a style similar to the Saxon Shore Forts, requiring the demolition of buildings within the vicus area outside it. It is known that in the late 11th century Roger de Poitou founded a Benedictine priory here. Excavations beneath the priory church suggest it was built over a pre-Conquest building, possibly a monastery founded under St Wilfred. Serveral of the buildings on the site are listed.[110]
Paythorne Bridge over the River Ribble
Paythorne Bridge over the River Ribble
Paythorne Bridge Bridge Paythorne and Newsholme

53°57′26″N 2°15′33″W / 53.9572°N 2.2591°W / 53.9572; -2.2591 (Paythorne Bridge)

Ribble Valley This four-arch bridge over the River Ribble, contains some Gothic ribbed arches possibly of late-medieval construction. Largely of sandstone construction with some limestone elements, two older arches cross the river channel on the east side and a further two added sometime after, pass over meadow land on the west. The bridge was widened over its full length from c.2.75 metres (9 ft 0 in) to about 6.75 metres (22.1 ft), and the parapets renewed, probably in the mid 19th century. The Pennine Bridleway National Trail crosses the river at this point. It is also Grade II listed.[111][112][113]
Penwortham Bridge over the River Ribble
Penwortham Bridge over the River Ribble
Penwortham Old Bridge[114] Bridge Penwortham

53°44′55″N 2°42′50″W / 53.7487°N 2.7140°W / 53.7487; -2.7140 (Penwortham Old Bridge)

Preston Built in 1759 to carry the traffic from Preston to Leyland, Liverpool and Southport.
Pike Lowe
Pike Lowe
Pike Low bowl barrow and site of beacon, Bonfire Hill Burial mound Briercliffe

53°48′15″N 2°09′42″W / 53.8042°N 2.1618°W / 53.8042; -2.1618 (Pike Low bowl barrow and site of beacon, Bonfire Hill)

Burnley Located on the summit of Bonfire Hill is a bowl barrow thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 15-metre (49 ft) by 13-metre (43 ft) oval mound of earth and stones up to 0.6 metres (2 ft 0 in) high. The site was used as part of a system of warning beacons during the medieval period and the top of the mound has been flattened to create a platform for the bonfire. This is a rare example of such a combination.[115]
Pikestones
Pikestones
Pike Stones chambered long cairn Cairn Anglezarke

53°39′00″N 2°33′57″W / 53.6499°N 2.5657°W / 53.6499; -2.5657 (Pike Stones chambered long cairn)

Chorley On a ridge on the lower part of Anglezarke Moor is a chambered long cairn thought to date from the Neolithic period. It consists of an up to 48-metre (157 ft) long mound of gritstones and glacial erratics up to 0.4 metres (1 ft 4 in) high, with a single internal chamber about 4.5 by 1 metre (14.8 by 3.3 ft) made of stone slabs.[116]
Pleasington alum works[117] Mining Pleasington

53°44′54″N 2°33′20″W / 53.7484°N 2.5555°W / 53.7484; -2.5555 (Pleasington alum works)

Blackburn with Darwen Remains of a Quarry & Alum works operated between 1609 and the end of the 18th century. It is the only surviving example of an alum site from this period in north west England.
Portfield Hillfort Fort Whalley

53°48′54″N 2°23′15″W / 53.8151°N 2.3875°W / 53.8151; -2.3875 (Portfield hillfort)

Ribble Valley A small, possibly Iron Age, hillfort also known as Planes Wood Camp is situated on a slight promontory to the east of the River Calder. The summit is flat, possibly artificially levelled, over an irregularly-shaped area measuring approximately 165 by 110 metres (541 by 361 ft). The defences have generally not survived well, but it is thought to be a univallate site, with a least one entrance on the northern side, subsequently modified to become multivallate. In 1966, workmen digging a trench here, discovered a hoard of nine Bronze Age artefacts including a gold bracelet and lock ring.[118]
Prehistoric defended enclosure and six adjacent hut circles at Tatham Park[119] Enclosure Tatham

54°06′38″N 2°35′48″W / 54.1106°N 2.5967°W / 54.1106; -2.5967 (Prehistoric defended enclosure and six adjacent hut circles at Tatham Park)

Lancaster
Prehistoric, Romano-British, medieval and early post-medieval settlements[120] Settlement Burrow-with-Burrow

54°11′52″N 2°33′00″W / 54.1978°N 2.5499°W / 54.1978; -2.5499 (Early settlements, field systems and a deer park at High Park)

Lancaster Including prehistoric hut circles, burial cairns (late Neolithic/early Bronze Age), field systems and a medieval deer park at High Park.

Located around Eller Beck in the Lune valley, either side of the border with Cumbria. East of Bindloss Farm within the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

Coke ovens at Aspen Valley Colliery, Oswaldtwistle
Coke ovens at Aspen Valley Colliery, Oswaldtwistle
Remains of Aspen Colliery Mining Oswaldtwistle

53°45′08″N 2°23′59″W / 53.7523°N 2.3998°W / 53.7523; -2.3998 (Remains of Aspen Colliery)

Hyndburn The underground remains of a Colliery (closed 1930), with associated, partially filled canal basin on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. Also 24 brick and stone built beehive coking ovens arranged in three banks, said to be the best preserved 19th century example in north west England.[121][122]
Dolphinholme Worsted Mill
Dolphinholme Worsted Mill
Remains of Dolphinholme Worsted Mill Buildings Nether Wyresdale

53°58′25″N 2°43′59″W / 53.9737°N 2.7330°W / 53.9737; -2.7330 (Remains of Dolphinholme Worsted Mill)

Wyre In 1811 Dolphinholme Worsted Mill, on the banks of the River Wyre, was one of the first mills in England to be lit by gas. It is thought to be the oldest gas plant or gas work remains known to survive in the world. The listing covers the gas plant and also chimney, mill race and waterwheel pit.[123]
Ribchester Roman Bath Buildings
Ribchester Roman Bath Buildings
Ribchester Roman fort (Bremetennacum) Fort Ribchester

53°48′33″N 2°32′05″W / 53.8091°N 2.5346°W / 53.8091; -2.5346 (Ribchester Roman fort)53°48′40″N 2°32′02″W / 53.8112°N 2.5340°W / 53.8112; -2.5340 (Ribchester Roman fort)53°48′38″N 2°31′59″W / 53.8106°N 2.5330°W / 53.8106; -2.5330 (Ribchester Roman fort)53°48′42″N 2°31′54″W / 53.8118°N 2.5316°W / 53.8118; -2.5316 (Ribchester Roman fort)53°48′47″N 2°31′52″W / 53.8131°N 2.5312°W / 53.8131; -2.5312 (Ribchester Roman fort)

Ribble Valley Located on the north bank of the River Ribble, the Roman fort here covered an area of about 2.4 hectares (5.9 acres), however the SE third has since been eroded by the river. Today St Wilfrid's Church stands at about the centre of it. The earliest fort was established in the early 70s AD, made of turf and timber. It was rebuilt in stone at the end of the century and a substantial vicus developed around it, covering almost the same area as the modern village. The most substantial stone-built construction so far discovered outside the fort is the Roman baths. The site is home to the only specialist Roman Museum in Lancashire.[124][125][126]
Ring cairn near Ell Clough Cairn Briercliffe

53°48′13″N 2°09′05″W / 53.8035°N 2.1514°W / 53.8035; -2.1514 (Ring cairn 25m east of Ell Clough)

Burnley Located 25 metres (82 ft) east of Ell Clough, close to the saucer barrow, is a ring cairn also thought to date from the Bronze Age. The slightly oval circle of stones formed a ring bank approximately 17.6 by 16.8 metres (58 by 55 ft). Hollows at the centre of the ring are the site of an archaeological excavation, undertaken in 1887, during which an interment urn was removed from beneath a flagstone.[127]
Ring cairn on Slipper Hill Cairn Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood

53°47′28″N 2°10′36″W / 53.7911°N 2.1767°W / 53.7911; -2.1767 (Ring cairn on Slipper Hill)

Burnley Located a short distance south west of Hell Clough on Slipper Hill, is a ring cairn thought to date from the Bronze Age. The slightly oval circle of stones formed a ring bank approximately 11.7 by 10.4 metres (38 by 34 ft). Only six stones survive today, the largest of which is 0.45 metres (1 ft 6 in) wide and protrudes just 0.2 metres (7.9 in) above the surface. A limited excavavation, undertaken in 1887, located human remains.[128]
Lune valley at Over Burrow
Lune valley at Over Burrow
Roman fort and civil settlement, Over Burrow Fort Burrow-with-Burrow

54°10′41″N 2°35′43″W / 54.1780°N 2.5953°W / 54.1780; -2.5953 (Roman fort and civil settlement, Over Burrow)54°10′42″N 2°35′21″W / 54.1782°N 2.5892°W / 54.1782; -2.5892 (Roman fort and civil settlement, Over Burrow)

Lancaster Burrow Hall was built in the 18th century on the site of Over Burrow Roman Fort. A timber fort was established here probably in the late first century (during the Flavian dynasty) but little is known about it. Archaeological excavation of the clay-and-turf ramparts and defensive ditches also suggests a second period of occupation at a so far undetermined time. Probably in the late third or early fourth century, a stone-built fort was constructed, apparently on a slightly different alignment. The fort had a rectangular plan with rounded corners, about 143 by 136 metres (470 by 445 ft) with an area of c.1.9 hectares (4.75 acres). A civil settlement is thought to have developed to the west, between the fort and the River Lune. The hall is a Grade I listed building.[129][130][131]
Burscough Roman fort
Burscough Roman fort
Roman fort and sections of Roman roads Fort Burscough

53°35′28″N 2°50′09″W / 53.5910°N 2.8358°W / 53.5910; -2.8358 (Burscough Roman fort)

West Lancashire A Roman auxiliary fort with at least two construction phases and surrounding roads.[132]
Roman kilns[133] Kilns Quernmore

54°01′40″N 2°43′49″W / 54.0277°N 2.7304°W / 54.0277; -2.7304 (Roman kilns 25yds (20m) NE of Fairyhill Cottage)

Lancaster 20m NE of Fairyhill Cottage
Roman milestone[134] Transport Leck

54°10′45″N 2°34′05″W / 54.1792°N 2.5681°W / 54.1792; -2.5681 (Roman milestone)

Lancaster Milestone (Margary 7c / RR 7c). 150m SE of Overtown Farm
Roman road at Bottom o' th' Knotts Brow Transport North Turton

53°38′07″N 2°23′16″W / 53.6352°N 2.3879°W / 53.6352; -2.3879 (Roman road at Bottom o' th' Knotts Brow)

Blackburn with Darwen Near Walves Reservoir, Bury Road briefly follows part of the line of the Roman road south from Ribchester fort (Margary 7b / RR 7b), the two deviating at Bottom o' th' Knotts Brow. The exposed section of the Roman road at this junction is protected by an entry on the schedule.[135][136]
Winery Lane
Winery Lane
Roman settlement and industrial area at Winery Lane Settlement Walton-le-Dale

53°44′56″N 2°40′54″W / 53.7489°N 2.6816°W / 53.7489; -2.6816 (Roman settlement and industrial area at Winery Lane)53°44′50″N 2°40′53″W / 53.7473°N 2.6813°W / 53.7473; -2.6813 (Roman settlement and industrial area at Winery Lane)53°44′57″N 2°40′50″W / 53.7493°N 2.6806°W / 53.7493; -2.6806 (Roman settlement and industrial area at Winery Lane)

South Ribble At Walton-le-Dale, a Roman settlement and industrial area located where the River Darwen joins the River Ribble.[137][138][139]
Mellor Moor
Mellor Moor
Roman signal station on Mellor Moor Building Mellor

53°46′37″N 2°31′16″W / 53.7769°N 2.5211°W / 53.7769; -2.5211 (Roman signal station on Mellor Moor)

Ribble Valley The summit of Mellor Moor was the location of a Roman signal station with the site providing extensive views, especially towards the fort at Ribchester (Bremetennacum). A building platform approximately 19 by 10 metres (62 by 33 ft), surrounded by a ditch and bank, is thought to have contained a central tower possibly originally constructed of wood and later replaced by a stone structure. Limited archaeological excavations have dated the construction to around 80 AD. A trig point at the western side is also included in the scheduling.[140]
Romano-British enclosed hut circle settlement[141] Settlement Leck

54°10′05″N 2°33′18″W / 54.1681°N 2.5551°W / 54.1681; -2.5551 (Romano-British enclosed hut circle settlement 375m ENE of Collingholme)

Lancaster 375m ENE of Collingholme
Round cairn at Borwick[142] Cairn Borwick

54°08′57″N 2°43′50″W / 54.1493°N 2.7306°W / 54.1493; -2.7306 (Round cairn 230m east of Manor Farm)

Lancaster 230m East of Manor Farm
Round cairn at Earby Cairn Earby

53°54′17″N 2°07′00″W / 53.9047°N 2.1167°W / 53.9047; -2.1167 (Round cairn 230m west of Bleara Lowe)

Pendle In the West Craven area historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, 230 metres (750 ft) west of the Bleara Lowe round cairn, is another, also thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 23-metre (75 ft) by 21-metre (69 ft) oval mound of peat and heather-covered stones up to 1.2 metres (3 ft 11 in) high.[143]
Round cairn on Hameldon Pasture Cairn Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood

53°47′23″N 2°10′00″W / 53.7896°N 2.1666°W / 53.7896; -2.1666 (Round cairn on Hameldon Pasture)

Burnley On Hameldon Pasture, close to the bowl barrow, is a round cairn thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 13-metre (43 ft) wide, circular mound of earth and stones up to 0.3 metres (1 ft 0 in) high. Hollows at the centre of the barrow are the site of an archaeological excavation, undertaken in 1843, during which an interment urn was discovered.[144]
Noon Hill summit
Noon Hill summit
Round cairn on Noon Hill Cairn Rivington

53°37′49″N 2°32′07″W / 53.6302°N 2.5353°W / 53.6302; -2.5353 (Round cairn on Noon Hill)

Chorley On the northern side of the summit of Noon Hill is a round cairn, thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 21-by-19-metre (69 by 62 ft) oval mound of stones and earth up to 1.3 metres (4 ft 3 in) high. Believed to have had a surrounding kerb of gritstone boulders, today only three can be seen of the south side of the cairn. There is another nearby on Winter Hill.[145]
Parlick Pike summit
Parlick Pike summit
Round cairn on Parlick Pike Cairn Chipping & Bleasdale

53°53′59″N 2°37′00″W / 53.8998°N 2.6167°W / 53.8998; -2.6167 (Round cairn on Parlick Pike)

Ribble Valley / Wyre At the summit of Parlick Pike in the Forest of Bowland, there is a Bronze Age round cairn. It consists of a circular mound of mainly turf covered stones up to 1.4 metres (4 ft 7 in) high and 17 metres (56 ft) in diameter.[146]
Cairn on Summerhouse Hill
Cairn on Summerhouse Hill
Round cairn on Summerhouse Hill Cairn Yealand Conyers

54°09′43″N 2°45′54″W / 54.1619°N 2.7650°W / 54.1619; -2.7650 (Round cairn on Summerhouse Hill)

Lancaster On the eastern slope of Summerhouse Hill, toward the summit, is a round cairn, thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a turf-covered, 12.5-by-9.4-metre (41 by 31 ft) oval mound of limestone rubble and earth up to 0.6 metres (2 ft 0 in) high, with a surrounding kerb of limestone blocks. An excavation undertaken in 1778, has left a 0.3-metre (1 ft 0 in) deep, 2.5-metre (8 ft 2 in) diameter circular depression at the centre of the cairn.[147]
Round cairn on Thornley Hall Fell Cairn Thornley-with-Wheatley

53°51′33″N 2°32′27″W / 53.8592°N 2.5408°W / 53.8592; -2.5408 (Round cairn on Thornley Hall Fell)

Ribble Valley 430 metres (1,410 ft) east of Meg Hall, at a local high point on Thornley Hall Fell, is a round cairn, thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 36-metre (118 ft) diameter circular mound of stones and earth up to 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in) high. The cairn has been disturbed on the northern side and a pile of loose stones dumped on it.[148]
Round cairn on Winter Hill Cairn Rivington

53°37′50″N 2°31′19″W / 53.6305°N 2.5220°W / 53.6305; -2.5220 (Round cairn on Winter Hill)

Chorley On the northern side of the summit plateau of Winter Hill is a round cairn, thought to date from the Bronze Age. It is a 19.2-metre (63 ft) circular mound of stones and earth up to 0.3 metres (1 ft 0 in) high, with a surrounding kerb about 0.4 metres (1 ft 4 in) high. Analysis of pollen retrieved during an excavation in the 1950s, suggests it was constructed between 1600-1400 BC. There is another nearby on Noon Hill.[149]
Round Loaf Tumulus
Round Loaf Tumulus
Round Loaf bowl barrow on Anglezarke Moor Burial mound Anglezarke

53°39′33″N 2°32′57″W / 53.6592°N 2.5493°W / 53.6592; -2.5493 (Round Loaf bowl barrow on Anglezarke Moor)

Chorley A bowl barrow thought to date from the late Neolithic or Bronze Age periods. It is a 73-metre (240 ft) by 66-metre (217 ft) oval mound, constructed of earth and small stones to a height of 3.6 to 5.5 metres (12 to 18 ft).[150]
Rufford moated site Moated site Rufford

53°38′54″N 2°49′18″W / 53.6482°N 2.8217°W / 53.6482; -2.8217 (Rufford moated site)

West Lancashire A medieval moated site.[151]
Saucer barrow near Ell Clough Burial mound Briercliffe

53°48′12″N 2°09′01″W / 53.8033°N 2.1503°W / 53.8033; -2.1503 (Saucer barrow 90m east of Ell Clough)

Burnley Located 90 metres (300 ft) east of Ell Clough, is a saucer barrow thought to date from the Bronze Age. The approximately 0.4-metre (1 ft 4 in) high and 14-metre (46 ft) wide, circular mound of earth and stones is surrounded by an approximately 1.5-metre (4 ft 11 in) wide ditch up to 0.2 metres (7.9 in) deep. An outer bank flanks the ditch, about 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) wide and up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high. A circular hollow at the centre of the mound is the site of an archaeological excavation, undertaken in 1887.[152]
Sawley Abbey Ruins
Sawley Abbey Ruins
Sawley Abbey Building Sawley

53°54′42″N 2°20′22″W / 53.9117°N 2.3395°W / 53.9117; -2.3395 (Sawley Cistercian abbey)

Ribble Valley A Cistercian abbey operated here from 1149 until 1536, founded by William de Percy, originally as a colony of Newminster Abbey. As with Whalley, the last abbot was executed for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace. The most visible remains today are the ruins of the church and attached buildings, which still retains walls standing up to 8 metres (26 ft) high. It is also a Grade I listed building.[153]
Scarisbrick Park holy well Well Scarisbrick

53°36′04″N 2°55′36″W / 53.6012°N 2.9268°W / 53.6012; -2.9268 (Scarisbrick Park holy well)

West Lancashire A medieval holy well located a short distance north of Scarisbrick Park wayside cross.[154]
Scarisbrick Wayside Cross
Scarisbrick Wayside Cross
Scarisbrick Park wayside cross Cross Scarisbrick

53°36′04″N 2°55′37″W / 53.6010°N 2.926916°W / 53.6010; -2.926916 (Scarisbrick Park wayside cross)

West Lancashire A medieval wayside cross located a short distance south of Scarisbrick Park holy well.[155]
Sellet Bank prehistoric defended enclosure[156] Enclosure Whittington

54°11′25″N 2°36′24″W / 54.1902°N 2.6067°W / 54.1902; -2.6067 (Sellet Bank prehistoric defended enclosure)

Lancaster
Site of Newsholme Old Hall Building Newsholme

53°57′29″N 2°15′06″W / 53.9581°N 2.2516°W / 53.9581; -2.2516 (Site of the Old Hall)

Ribble Valley Newsholme was mentioned in the Domesday Book but little is known of the old hall's history. Located next to the Ribble, NW of Castle Haugh and adjacent to Demesne Farm, the site now has shallow ditches around a level earth area 80 by 100 metres (260 by 330 ft), containing the hall's foundations.[157][158]
Skerton Bridge over the River Lune in Lancaster
Skerton Bridge over the River Lune in Lancaster
Skerton Bridge Bridge Lancaster

54°03′16″N 2°47′47″W / 54.0545°N 2.7965°W / 54.0545; -2.7965 (Skerton Bridge)

Lancaster This bridge over the River Lune was designed by Thomas Harrison and was completed in 1787. It consists of five shallow semi-elliptical arches with semicircular cutwaters, and was the first major public bridge in England to have a flat deck. The east end has been altered to make a passage for a railway which opened in 1849. It is also a Grade II* listed building.[159][160]
Stone circle on Delf Hill
Stone circle on Delf Hill
Small stone circle on Delf Hill Henge Briercliffe

53°47′59″N 2°09′08″W / 53.7998°N 2.1523°W / 53.7998; -2.1523 (Small stone circle on Delf Hill)

Burnley About 80 metres (260 ft) east of the summit of Delf Hill there is a small stone circle, thought to date from the late Neolithic to the mid Bronze Age. Seven stones, some of which are still standing, have been arranged in a 7-metre (23 ft) circle. In the centre is a 0.2-metre (7.9 in) high, 2.4-metre (7 ft 10 in) diameter cairn surrounded by a shallow ditch. Limited archaeological excavation on the cairn was undertaken in 1842, during which three interment urns were discovered.[161]
Spigot mortar (Blacker Bombard) position Military Hapton

53°47′07″N 2°18′46″W / 53.7853°N 2.3129°W / 53.7853; -2.3129 (Spigot mortar (Blacker Bombard) position)

Burnley At the north end of the village is a position for a 'Blacker Bombard' anti-tank 29mm spigot mortar dating to World War II. It comprises two 3-metre (9.8 ft) diameter sunken firing emplacements, each with a concrete thimble to mount the weapon and a ready-use ammunition locker, along with an Anderson shelter style store. Only a handful of these emplacements are known to exist in the North West.[162]
St. Patrick's Chapel, Heysham
St. Patrick's Chapel, Heysham
St Patrick's early Christian chapel and associated cemetery Building Lower Heysham, Lancaster

54°02′51″N 2°54′10″W / 54.0475°N 2.9028°W / 54.0475; -2.9028 (St Patrick's early Christian chapel)

Lancaster On the headland above St Peter's Church is the ruin of an earlier chapel, dedicated to Saint Patrick, itself built over the foundations of an even older building. The scheduling also includes the cemetery, with six rock-cut graves to the west of the chapel and a further two to the south east. Excavations at the site suggest it has been a Christian place of worship since possibly the eighth century.[163][164]
Reversing triangle
Reversing triangle
Steam tramway reversing triangle Transport Darwen

53°40′49″N 2°27′32″W / 53.6804°N 2.4589°W / 53.6804; -2.4589 (Steam tramway reversing triangle)

Blackburn with Darwen A reversing triangle originally constructed in 1881 as the terminus of the Blackburn and Darwen tram system, one of the first to be authorized to run solely on steam power in the UK.[165][166]
Stock medieval settlement Settlement Bracewell and Brogden

53°56′09″N 2°12′09″W / 53.9358°N 2.2026°W / 53.9358; -2.2026 (Stock medieval settlement and part of its associated medieval open field system)

Pendle In the valley of Stock Beck, north of Barnoldswick, was a settlement of unknown age, thought to have been abandoned during the 14th century. Evendence remains of enclosures or paddocks, hollow ways, house platforms, allotments or crofts, and wells. To the south, a communal, medieval open-field system spreads over Hawber Hill, which is topped by a square building platform. The site is unusual as it appears not to have a defined form and seems to represent a less structured, piecemeal development.[167]
Stone circle on Summerhouse Hill[168] Henge Yealand Conyers

54°09′45″N 2°46′04″W / 54.1626°N 2.7679°W / 54.1626; -2.7679 (Stone circle on Summerhouse Hill)54°09′46″N 2°46′00″W / 54.1627°N 2.7666°W / 54.1627; -2.7666 (Stone circle on Summerhouse Hill)54°09′43″N 2°45′56″W / 54.1620°N 2.7655°W / 54.1620; -2.7655 (Stone circle on Summerhouse Hill)

Lancaster
Cheetham Close
Cheetham Close
Stone circle, ring cairn and two round cairns on Cheetham Close Henge North Turton

53°38′19″N 2°25′49″W / 53.6385°N 2.4302°W / 53.6385; -2.4302 (Stone circle, ring cairn and two round cairns on Cheetham Close)

Blackburn with Darwen A Stone circle, ring cairn and two round cairns located in a cluster on a gentle slope, below the summit of Cheetham Close on the border with Greater Manchester. Presumed to be Bronze Age in origin.[169]
Thieveley Lead Mine, Cliviger
Thieveley Lead Mine, Cliviger
Thieveley lead mine Mining Cliviger

53°44′48″N 2°12′05″W / 53.7466°N 2.2015°W / 53.7466; -2.2015 (Thieveley lead mine)53°44′46″N 2°11′37″W / 53.7462°N 2.1937°W / 53.7462; -2.1937 (Thieveley lead mine)

Burnley Mining at Thieveley commenced shortly after lead was discovered here in 1627, but is only thought to have continued for about a decade, with parts of the area reworked for another short period sometime after 1753. The original smeltmill is believed to have utilised foot-powered bellows, but was soon superseded by a larger mill at the bottom of the valley. The eastern end of the site, 330 metres (1,080 ft) SW of Buckleys, includes serveral shafts, an ore processing area and the buried remains of the early smelt mill. 910 metres (2,990 ft) WSW of Buckleys, close to Black Clough there is another a shaft, a leat, and the remains of a buddle.[170]
One of three high crosses at Whalley
One of three high crosses at Whalley
Three high crosses in St Mary's churchyard Cross Whalley

53°50′52″N 2°27′04″W / 53.8478°N 2.4512°W / 53.8478; -2.4512 (Three high crosses in St Mary's churchyard)

Ribble Valley In the churchyard of St Mary's Church are three decorated pre-Norman cross shafts thought to date to the early 11th century. They are constructed of local sandstone with the tallest being approximately 2.9 metres (9 ft 6 in). Less than 50 high crosses survive in England and, although partly weathered and damaged, they have survived reasonably well and as a group are unparalleled in Lancashire.[171]
Torrisholme Barrow
Torrisholme Barrow
Torrisholme bowl barrow[172] Burial mound Morecambe

54°04′17″N 2°49′38″W / 54.0713°N 2.8272°W / 54.0713; -2.8272 (Torrisholme bowl barrow)

Lancaster
Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead
Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead
Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead Castle Briercliffe

53°47′58″N 2°10′14″W / 53.7995°N 2.1705°W / 53.7995; -2.1705 (Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead)

Burnley Located at the western end of Twist Hill, with extensive views over the surrounding area. An earth and stone rampart surviving up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high, around a rectangular farmstead enclosure about 44 by 40 metres (144 by 131 ft), with an entrance on the eastern side. There would also have been an outer ditch but little trace now remains. Attached to the south eastern side of the enclosure, next to the entrance, is a c.18-metre (59 ft) square annexe also with an earth and stone wall.[173]
Large roadside limekiln at Twiston
Large roadside limekiln at Twiston
Twiston lime kiln and associated tramway Kilns Twiston

53°53′44″N 2°17′31″W / 53.8955°N 2.2920°W / 53.8955; -2.2920 (Twiston lime kiln)

Ribble Valley On the roadside, 250 metres (820 ft) east of Twiston Mill, is a disused 19th-century lime kiln and the earthwork remains of a short tramway from the adjacent quarry. The single-pot, draw hole type kiln is about 7 metres (23 ft) high with a segmental draw arch approximately 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) high and 4 metres (13 ft) wide. To the south west c.30-metre (98 ft) long embankment carried the tramway up to the 6-metre (20 ft) diameter charge hole on top of the kiln.[174]
Ring Stones Camp
Ring Stones Camp
Two Romano-British farmsteads known as Ring Stones Settlement Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood

53°47′36″N 2°10′26″W / 53.7932°N 2.1738°W / 53.7932; -2.1738 (Two Romano-British farmsteads known as Ring Stones)

Burnley South of Twist Castle, across Swinden Water, Ring Stones Camp is the site of two Romano-British farmsteads, a later one built partially over the earlier. The older farmstead was about 50 metres (160 ft) square and part of the flanking ditch is still faintly visible. Some time after a replacement was constructed offset and less square, the earth and stone rampart surviving up to 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in) high, with a 3-metre (9.8 ft) wide outer ditch of similar depth. The enclosure measuring 48 by 33 by 39 by 37 metres (157 by 108 by 128 by 121 ft), with entrances on the east and west sides. Attached to the north eastern side of the enclosure, is a c.10-metre (33 ft) square annexe also with an earth and stone wall, utilising part of the earlier farmstead.[175]
Univallate prehistoric defended enclosure, hollow way and secondary enclosure Enclosure Claughton

54°05′28″N 2°39′17″W / 54.0910°N 2.6547°W / 54.0910; -2.6547 (Univallate prehistoric defended enclosures and hollow way near Claughton Hall)

Lancaster 250m North of Claughton Hall.[176]
The Church of St Thomas the Martyr, Upholland
The Church of St Thomas the Martyr, Upholland
Up Holland Priory Building Up Holland

53°32′24″N 2°43′16″W / 53.5400°N 2.7212°W / 53.5400; -2.7212 (Up Holland Benedictine priory)

West Lancashire The remaining standing ruins of the Benedictine priory are on the South side of the present Church of St Thomas the Martyr at Up Holland, which served as the priory's church in the Middle Ages. A religious college existed on the site before the priory was built.[177]
Warren at Everage Clough Earthwork Cliviger and Habergham Eaves

53°46′06″N 2°13′49″W / 53.7684°N 2.2303°W / 53.7684; -2.2303 (Warren at Everage Clough) 53°45′59″N 2°13′44″W / 53.7664°N 2.2288°W / 53.7664; -2.2288 (Warren at Everage Clough) 53°46′02″N 2°13′42″W / 53.7672°N 2.2284°W / 53.7672; -2.2284 (Warren at Everage Clough)

Burnley On either side of Everage Clough, 450 metres (1,480 ft) NE of New Copy Farm, is a medieval rabbit-breeding warren. It consists of eight pillow mounds, the longest 20.7 metres (68 ft), each surrounded by a shallow ditch. No records are known to exist about the warren, but it is presumed to be connected with Towneley Hall a little way to the NE.[178]
Warton Crag Quarry
Warton Crag Quarry
Warton Crag small multivallate hillfort Fort Warton

54°08′57″N 2°46′44″W / 54.1492°N 2.7789°W / 54.1492; -2.7789 (Warton Crag small multivallate hillfort)

Lancaster The summit of the hill is the site an ancient, approximately 3.2-hectare (7.9-acre) enclosure. It was defended by rock scarps and steep slopes to the south and west with triple stone ramparts forming an arc on the other sides. The scheduling classifies it as a small Iron Age multivallate hillfort,[179] however in 2016, research by Historic England proposed that the structure was instead a non-defensive in nature, possibly dating to the Late Bronze Age.[180]
The Old Rectory at Warton
The Old Rectory at Warton
Warton Old Rectory[181] Building Warton

54°08′39″N 2°46′06″W / 54.1443°N 2.7683°W / 54.1443; -2.7683 (Warton Old Rectory)

Lancaster Across the street from St Oswald's Church are the ruins of an early 14th-century stone house that was formerly the rectory. It was a ruin by 1721, but considered to be well preserved with the gables surviving to almost full height. It is also a Grade I listed building.[182]
Whalley Bridge Bridge Billington and Langho & Whalley

53°49′07″N 2°24′26″W / 53.8187°N 2.4072°W / 53.8187; -2.4072 (Whalley Bridge)

Ribble Valley Whalley Bridge spans the River Calder and its core is thought to be ancient. First mentioned in 1317, in 1634 an order to rebuild the bridge was made. A major overhaul was completed in 1917 when it was widened on both sides and the traditional pointed cutwaters replaced with rounded ones.[183][184]
Whalley Abbey near Billington
Whalley Abbey near Billington
Whalley Cistercian abbey Building Whalley

53°49′16″N 2°24′47″W / 53.8212°N 2.4131°W / 53.8212; -2.4131 (Whalley Cistercian abbey)53°49′12″N 2°24′37″W / 53.8201°N 2.4103°W / 53.8201; -2.4103 (Whalley Cistercian abbey)

Ribble Valley In 1296 the Cistercian monks from the unfortunate Stanlow Abbey moved to this site, next to the River Calder. Construction of the abbey slowly continued through 12th and 13th centuries, and it was dissolved at the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Like Sawley, the last abbot was executed for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Afterward a large house was built on the site and many of the abbey's buildings were demolished, however remains of the two gateways, the north wall, the east and south ranges of the cloister, the abbot's lodging, and a chapel survive. It is also a Grade I listed building.[185]
Whittington motte and bailey castle[186] Castle Whittington

54°10′50″N 2°36′54″W / 54.1806°N 2.6151°W / 54.1806; -2.6151 (Whittington motte and bailey castle)

Lancaster One of several similar Norman fortifications along the River Lune valley
Witton Old Hall medieval lordly residence Building Blackburn

53°44′27″N 2°30′38″W / 53.7407°N 2.5105°W / 53.7407; -2.5105 (Part of Witton Old Hall medieval lordly residence)

Blackburn with Darwen The ruins of a manor house and associated farm, located on the north bank of the River Blakewater downstream of the Feniscliffe Bridge in the south-west corner of Witton Country Park. The building is believed to date from around to 1544, however as the manor (part of the Honour of Clitheroe) dates to the 13th century, the site could contain earlier remains.[187][188]
Clapper Bridge Over Wycoller Beck
Clapper Bridge Over Wycoller Beck
Wycoller Bank House Bridge Bridge Trawden Forest

53°50′47″N 2°05′56″W / 53.8463°N 2.0989°W / 53.8463; -2.0989 (Bank House Bridge, Wycoller)

Pendle Also called the Clam Bridge, it is formed from a single 3.65-metre (12 ft) slab of millstone grit. It spans Wycoller Beck, supported by rudimentary piers in each bank. The bridge is not possible to accurately age, it could be over 1,000 years old, but a 15th or 16th century date is more probable. It is also a Grade II* listed building.[189][190][191][192]
Wycoller Hall Ruins
Wycoller Hall Ruins
Wycoller Hall Building Trawden Forest

53°50′56″N 2°06′14″W / 53.8490°N 2.1038°W / 53.8490; -2.1038 (Wycoller Hall)

Pendle Wycoller Hall dates back to the end of the 16th century, and was extended several times. The Cunliffe family settled at the estate in the early 17th century and after the last member of the family died, heavily-endebted, in 1819 it was abandoned as a residence. It is also a Grade II* listed building.[193][194][195]
Hall Bridge over Wycoller Beck
Hall Bridge over Wycoller Beck
Wycoller Hall Bridge Bridge Trawden Forest

53°50′56″N 2°06′16″W / 53.8490°N 2.1044°W / 53.8490; -2.1044 (The Hall Bridge, Wycoller)

Pendle Also known as Druids’ Bridge or Weavers’ Bridge. It is a basic clapper bridge structure of two big gritstone slabs supported by a central pier and the banks of Wycoller Beck. Also undateable, it may have been originally constructed in the 16th or 17th century. To repair the bridge after a fracture of the eastern clapper, an additional pier has been added. It is also Grade II* listed.[189][190][196][197]
Packhorse Bridge over Wycoller Beck
Packhorse Bridge over Wycoller Beck
Wycoller packhorse bridge Bridge Trawden Forest

53°50′58″N 2°06′15″W / 53.8494°N 2.1043°W / 53.8494; -2.1043 (Wycoller packhorse bridge)

Pendle Double-arched packhorse bridge over Wycoller Beck, from the 17th century or earlier. Also known as Sally's Bridge (named after a member of the Cunliffe family who lived in Wycoller Hall in 1900s). It is also a Grade II* listed building.[189][198][199]

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Transcription

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c This row contains two entries on the official schedule list.

Citations

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  149. ^ Historic England. "Round cairn on Winter Hill (1008906)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  150. ^ Historic England. "Round Loaf bowl barrow on Anglezarke Moor (1008904)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  151. ^ Historic England. "Rufford moated site (1012316)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  152. ^ Historic England. "Saucer barrow 90m east of Ell Clough (1009116)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  153. ^ Historic England. "Sawley Cistercian abbey and associated earthworks (1015492)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  154. ^ Historic England. "Scarisbrick Park holy well (1009493)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  155. ^ Historic England. "Scarisbrick Park wayside cross (1009492)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  156. ^ Historic England. "Sellet Bank prehistoric defended enclosure (1011685)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  157. ^ Greenlane Archaeology. "Lancashire Historic Monuments" (PDF). Rapid surveys for Lancashire County Council. pp. 22–27. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  158. ^ Historic England. "Site of the Old Hall (1005093)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  159. ^ Historic England. "Skerton Bridge, Lancaster (1212253)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 6 December 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  160. ^ Historic England. "Skerton Bridge (1005109)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  161. ^ Historic England. "Small stone circle on Delf Hill (1008916)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  162. ^ Historic England. "Spigot mortar (Blacker Bombard) position (1432881)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  163. ^ Historic England. "St Patrick's early Christian chapel and associated cemetery, Lower Heysham (1020535)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  164. ^ Historic England. "St Patrick's early Christian chapel and associated cemetery, Lower Heysham (1020535)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 December 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  165. ^ Greenlane Archaeology. "Lancashire Historic Monuments" (PDF). Rapid surveys for Lancashire County Council. pp. 32–35. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  166. ^ Historic England. "Steam tramway reversing triangle (1005096)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  167. ^ Historic England. "Stock medieval settlement and part of its associated medieval open field system (1020367)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  168. ^ Historic England. "Stone circle on Summerhouse Hill (1009118)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  169. ^ Historic England. "Stone circle, ring cairn and two round cairns on Cheetham Close (1009121)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  170. ^ Historic England. "Thieveley lead mine 330m south west and 910m WSW of Buckleys (1021252)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 December 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  171. ^ Historic England. "Three high crosses in St Mary's churchyard (1009489)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  172. ^ Historic England. "Torrisholme bowl barrow (1008912)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  173. ^ Historic England. "Twist Castle Romano-British farmstead (1009497)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  174. ^ Historic England. "Twiston lime kiln and associated tramway 250m east of Twiston Mill (1021016)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  175. ^ Historic England. "Two Romano-British farmsteads known as Ring Stones (1009488)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  176. ^ Historic England. "Univallate prehistoric defended enclosure, hollow way and secondary enclosure 250m north of Claughton Hall (1011684)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  177. ^ Historic England. "Up Holland Benedictine priory (1013649)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  178. ^ Historic England. "Warren at Everage Clough 450m north east of New Copy Farm (1018362)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  179. ^ Historic England. "Warton Crag small multivallate hillfort (1007633)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  180. ^ Evans, Sally; Jecock, Marcus; Oakey, Matthew (2017). "Warton Crag hilltop enclosure, Warton, Lancashire: Aerial Mapping and Analytical Field Survey". Historic England Research Department Reports. Retrieved 30 November 2020. Includes link to full report as .pdf
  181. ^ Historic England. "Warton Old Rectory (1007901)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  182. ^ Historic England. "Old Rectory (1362462)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  183. ^ Greenlane Archaeology. "Lancashire Historic Monuments" (PDF). Rapid surveys for Lancashire County Council. pp. 16–21. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  184. ^ Historic England. "Whalley Bridge (1005107)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  185. ^ Historic England. "Whalley Cistercian abbey (1008636)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  186. ^ Historic England. "Whittington motte and bailey castle (1010796)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  187. ^ Historic England. "Part of Witton Old Hall medieval lordly residence 340m north east of Feniscliffe Bridge (1020459)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  188. ^ Greenlane Archaeology. "Lancashire Historic Monuments" (PDF). Rapid surveys for Lancashire County Council. pp. 9–15. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
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  190. ^ a b Anon. "Wycoller Clapper Bridges". Engineering Timelines.
  191. ^ Historic England. "Bank House Bridge, Trawden Forest (1243830)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  192. ^ Historic England. "Bank House Bridge, Wycoller (1005104)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  193. ^ Farrer, William; Brownbill, John, eds. (1911), The Victoria History of the County of Lancaster Vol 6, Victoria County History, Constable & Co, pp. 548–552, OCLC 832215477
  194. ^ Historic England. "Remains of Wycoller Hall, including boundary wall to river, Trawden Forest (1073331)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  195. ^ Historic England. "Wycoller Hall (1003130)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  196. ^ Historic England. "Clapper Bridge, Trawden Forest (1243829)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  197. ^ Historic England. "The Hall Bridge, Wycoller (1005103)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  198. ^ Historic England. "Pack Horse Bridge, Trawden Forest (1243828)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  199. ^ Historic England. "Wycoller packhorse bridge (1005098)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 November 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
This page was last edited on 15 March 2021, at 10:52
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