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Sassi di Matera

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sassi di Matera
The Sassi of Matera
Sassi di Matera in November 2005
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Official name The Sassi and the Park of the Rupestrian Churches of Matera
Location Matera, Italy Edit this at Wikidata
Coordinates 40°40′00″N 16°36′30″E / 40.6667°N 16.6083°E / 40.6667; 16.6083
Criteria Cultural: iii, iv, v
Reference 670
Inscription 1993 (17th Session)
Website www.sassidimatera.it
Location of Sassi di Matera

The Sassi di Matera are two districts (Sasso Caveoso and Sasso Barisano) of the Italian city of Matera, Basilicata, well-known for their ancient cave dwellings.

The "Sassi" have been defined by Fodor's as "one of the most unique landscapes in Europe".[1]

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • MATERA I SASSI patrimonio UNESCO "the city of the Sassi" [HD]
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  • MATERA ( Italy ) - I SASSI di MATERA - Patrimonio UNESCO -- The City of " Sassi " -
  • The Real-Life Flintstones Village: Sassi di Matera 9,000-Year-Old Italy Still Inhabited
  • SASSI DI MATERA

Transcription

Contents

History

 Panoramic view from the Canyon (Gravina)
Panoramic view from the Canyon (Gravina)

The Sassi originate from a prehistoric troglodyte settlement and are suspected to be among the first human settlements in Italy. There is evidence that people were living here as early as the year 7000 BC.[2]

The Sassi are houses dug into the calcarenitic rock itself, which is characteristic of Basilicata and Apulia, locally called "tufo" although it is not volcanic tuff or tufa. The streets in some parts of the Sassi often run on top of other houses. The ancient town grew up on one slope of the ravine created by a river that is now a small stream. The ravine is known locally as "la Gravina".

In the 1950s, the government of Italy forcefully relocated most of the population of the Sassi to areas of the developing modern city. Riddled with malaria, the unhealthy living conditions were considered an affront to the new Italian Republic of Alcide De Gasperi.[3] However, people continued to live in the Sassi, and according to the English Fodor's guide[when?]:

Matera is the only place in the world where people can boast to be still living in the same houses of their ancestors of 9,000 years ago.

Until the late 1980s this was considered an area of poverty, since many of these houses were, and in some cases still are, uninhabitable. The current local administration, however, has become more tourism-oriented, and it has promoted the regeneration of the Sassi with the aid of the European Union, the government, UNESCO. Today there are many thriving businesses, pubs, and hotels there, as described in an April 2015 article in The New Yorker .[4]

Geography

The "Sassi" grew in the area of Murgia Plateau,[5] extended between Apulia and Basilicata. Along with the "Civita" and the "Piano", the two Sassi form Matera's Old Town.[6]

Culture

 Sassi with snow (December 2007)
Sassi with snow (December 2007)

The Sassi are reminiscent of ancient sites in and around Jerusalem, and for this reason they have been used in many Christian-themed films, including The Gospel According to St. Matthew (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1964), The Passion of the Christ (Mel Gibson, 2004), The Nativity Story (Catherine Hardwicke, 2006) and Ben-Hur (Timur Bekmambetov, 2016).[7]

They also appeared in Patty Jenkins's Wonder Woman (2017), serving as a location for the Amazons' city Themyscira.[8]

Gallery

See also

References

External links

This page was last edited on 20 March 2018, at 08:47.
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