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Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure (Saskatchewan)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure
Flag of Saskatchewan.svg
Organization overview
Formed1917
Employees1,476
Minister responsible
Parent OrganizationGovernment of Saskatchewan
Websitewww.highways.gov.sk.ca
Routing of SK highways around Saskatoon
Routing of SK highways around Saskatoon

The Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure is divided into the Operations, Policy and Programs, and Corporate Services Divisions and the Communications Branch. The ministry is the employer of over 1,476 employees diversified amongst 105 communities in Saskatchewan.[1] The current Minister of Highways and Infrastructure is Greg Ottenbreit.

Operations Division

The Operation Division has the responsibility of maintaining 9,249 kilometres (5,747 mi) of asphalt concrete pavements, 4,929 kilometres (3,063 mi) of granular pavements, 6,102 kilometres (3,792 mi) of thin membrane surface (TMS) highways, 5,621 kilometres (3,493 mi) of gravel highways, 171 kilometres (106 mi) km of ice roads, 805 kilometres (500 mi) bridges, 453 kilometres (281 mi) large culverts, 12 ferries, one barge and 17 northern airports. Operational maintenance includes surface repair activities like crack filling, sealing, and patching; snow and ice control; pavement marking; signing; and ferry operations. Along with engineering, construction and design of the provincial road network, the operations division provides regulations, inspections and advice to the rural municipalities (R.M.) for the municipal road network.[1]

Ferries

All ferries in Saskatchewan are operated by the Government of Saskatchewan and, with the exception of the Wollaston Barge Ferry, are toll free. All are seasonal, with ferries generally operating from mid April to mid November, depending on ice conditions. The ferries operated include:[2]

Policy and Programs Division

The Policy and Programs Division works with other legislative and regulatory agencies to ensure an optimal transportation network is provided via road, rail, air, and marine.[1]

Corporate Services Division

Corporate Services Division is responsible for the budgeting, finances, and forecasting for the needs of the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure.[1]

Communications Branch

The Communications Branch of the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure maintains the news releases, safety awareness and education programs.[1]

Transport Compliance Branch

Transport Compliance Branch maintains the Saskatchewan Highway Patrol. The 14 detachments operate six border and seven interior weigh stations, three 24-hour self-weigh decks and one Mobile Vehicle Inspection Station. The head office regulates their operations in compliance with the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and the Canadian Council Motor Transport Administrators.[3]

Area Transportation Planning Support Program

Area Transportation Planning (ATP) Support Program analyzes transportation in regional areas to provide funding for regional needs.[1] Committees which comprise representatives from the local rural and urban municipalities, Regional Economic Development Authorities (REDA), Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, and Highways and Infrastructure analyze local needs and the effects of the increased use of grain via truck transportation and the decreased use of rail transport is having on road infrastructure.[4] There are currently 9 committees which comprise the majority of Saskatchewan except for an area near La Ronge and Southend.

  • Athabasica Basin Transportation Planning Committee
  • North North West Transportation Planning Committee
  • North North East Transportation Planning Committee
  • West Central Transportation Planning Committee
  • Central Transportation Planning Committee
  • North East Area Transportation Planning Committee
  • East Central Transportation Planning Committee
  • South East Transportation Planning Committee
  • South Central Transportation Planning Committee
  • Southwest Transportation Planning Committee

The Strategic Partnership Program

The Strategic Partnership Program analyzes low traffic volume thin membrane surface highways working with R.M.s and First Nation agencies to provide an effective and operational traffic flow between thin membrane surface highways and the provincial network.[1]

Community Airport Partnership

Community Airport Partnership (CAP) provides a mandate to the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure to maintain and assist southern airport infrastructure.[5]

Adopt-A-Highway Program

Groups or individuals may sponsor a 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) stretch of highway to pick up litter and maintain highway appearances.[6]

History

Early surveyed Road allowance precursors of roads
Early surveyed Road allowance precursors of roads

Up until 1904 all municipal affairs were administered by the Territorial Dept. of Public Works. In 1904, [Churchbridge]...became a portion of a larger area known as a Local Improvement District of approximately 144 square miles (370 km2) square miles...Road construction costs around 1900, were very low. The cost of building a road 20 feet (6.1 m) wide with an 0 feet 18 inches (0.46 m) crown cost approximately $30, per 1 mile (1.6 km)

— The First Hundred Years : Around Churchbridge, 1880-1980.[7]

A person could work for the municipality and have his earnings put toward the taxes on his land; at one time, money collected in each Division stayed in that Division....The RM has as its responsibilities for many areas: agricultural programs and concerns in general; tax collections for needs of the municipality — road construction and maintenance; protective services — pest control, fire protection, weed control, environmental development, cultural and educational services; medical and veterinary needs and so forth.

US — Canada Border Crossing near Val Marie
US — Canada Border Crossing near Val Marie

Originally roadwork was done by horsepower, and the municipality owned its horses and equipment. It was found that roadwork under the supervision of a councilor cost half as much as that under a road commission system. There were problems with labor. One cold November payday the whole crew quit, with not one left to even feed the horses. In 1909 a foreman shot one of his crew; the [Indian Head] council minutes make no further comment.

— History of Indian Head and District Inc., Indian Head: history of Indian Head and district (1981)[9]

The building of these roads is under the personal supervision of the rural councilors of the R.M. The Provincial Government each year makes a substantial grant to the Municipality for permanent trunk road building.

— Moosomin, Saskatchewan. Board of Trade, Progressive Moosomin, industrial and commercial centre of Saskatchewan(1981)[10]
Dirt road during horse and cart era
Dirt road during horse and cart era

In 1913 the road system consisted of miles of prairie trails. The roads gradually improved with the assistance of jointly funded Provincial and Municipal road programs such as the Grid Road program, the Main Farm Access program, and the Super Grid system which led to the eventual formation of Municipal Maintenance Areas. The RM's of Gull Lake, Carmichael, and Webb formed Maintenance Area No. 1, the first in the Province.

— Sask Biz Piapot No. 110[11]

During the term of office for Eiling Kramer, 1972–1980, the Provincial Highway received extensive funding and paving for the entire system neared completion.[12]Saskatchewan Highway 11 was restructured under the term of office of David Boldt, Minister 1966-1971.[13] John T. Douglas, during his term of office 1944-1960 established the Saskatchewan Transportation Company as a Crown Corporation of the government.[14] Alan Carl Stewart, Minister of Highways 1929-1934, allocated $20 million for highway construction in Saskatchewan.[15] George Spence, Minister of Highways 1927-1929, was responsible for the initiation of numbering Saskatchewan highways.[16]

The first Board of Highways Commissioners was appointed by the provincial government in 1912, and the first Department of Highways was established in 1917.[17] On September 1, 1934, the name was changed from the Department of Highways to the Department of Highways and Transportation. Effective November 21, 2007 the Department of Highways and Transportation became the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure.[18]

Past Ministers

Ministers historically
Term Minister Title Administration Source
November 21, 2007 Honourable Wayne Elhard Highways and Transportation Minister under Brad Wall [1]
October 12, 2001 – November 21, 2007 Honourable Mark Wartman Highways and Transportation Minister under Lorne Calvert [19]
February 8, 2001- October 12, 2001 Honourable Patricia Atkinson Highways and Transportation Minister under Lorne Calvert [19]
September 30, 1999 – February 8, 2001 Honourable Maynard Sonntag Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [20]
June 27, 1997- September 30, 1999 Honourable Judy Llewellyn Bradley Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21][22]
April 29, 1997 – June 27, 1997 Honourable Clay J. Serby Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21]
September 20, 1993 - April 25, 1997 Honourable Andrew (Andy) L.J. Renaud Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21]
June 4, 1993 – September 20, 1993 Honourable Darrel Cunningham Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21]
September 29, 1992 – June 4, 1993 Honourable Murray James Koskie Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21]
November 1, 1991 - September 29, 1992 Honourable Bernhard H. Wiens Highways and Transportation Minister under Roy Romanow [21]
October 3, 1989 - November 1, 1991 Honourable Sherwin Petersen Highways and Transportation Minister under Grant Devine [21]
December 16, 1985 – October 3, 1989 Honourable Grant Milton Hodgins Highways and Transportation Minister under Grant Devine [21]
December 4, 1985 – December 16, 1985 Honourable Donald Grant Devine Highways and Transportation Minister under Grant Devine [21]
May 8, 1982 – December 4, 1985 Honourable James William Arthur Garner Highways and Transportation Minister under Grant Devine [21]
December 16, 1980 – May 8, 1982 Honourable Robert Gavin Long Highways and Transportation Minister under Allan Blakeney [21]
May 12, 1972 – December 16, 1980 Honourable Eiling Kramer Highways and Transportation Minister under Allan Blakeney [21]
June 30, 1971- May 12, 1972 Honourable Neil Erland Byers Highways and Transportation Minister under Allan Blakeney [21]
October 18, 1966 – June 30, 1971 Honourable David Boldt Highways and Transportation Minister under Ross Thatcher [21]
May 22, 1964 – October 18, 1966 Honourable Gordon Burton Grant Highways and Transportation Minister under Ross Thatcher [21]
November 7, 1961 – May 22, 1964 Honourable Clarence George Willis Highways and Transportation Minister under Woodrow Stanley Lloyd [21]
August 1, 1960 – November 7, 1961 Honourable Clarence George Willis Highways and Transportation Minister under Tommy Douglas [21]
July 10, 1944 – August 1, 1960 Honourable John T. Douglas Highways and Transportation Minister under Tommy Douglas [23]
December 1, 1938 – July 10, 1944 Honourable Arthur Thomas Procter Highways and Transportation Minister under William John Patterson [21]
November 3, 1938 – December 1, 1938 Honourable William Franklin Kerr Highways and Transportation Minister under William John Patterson [21]
November 1, 1935 – November 3, 1938 Honourable Charles Morton Dunn Highways and Transportation Minister under William John Patterson [21]
September 1, 1934 – November 1, 1935 Honourable Charles Morton Dunn Highways and Transportation Minister under James Garfield Gardiner [21]
July 19, 1934 – September 1, 1934 Honourable Charles Morton Dunn Minister of Highways under James Garfield Gardiner [21]
September 9, 1929 – July 19, 1934 Honourable Alan Carl Stewart Minister of Highways under James T.M. Anderson [21]
December 8, 1927 - September 9, 1929 Honourable George Spence Minister of Highways under James Garfield Gardiner [21]
November 10, 1926 - December 8, 1927 Honourable William John Patterson Minister of Highways under James Garfield Gardiner [21]
April 5, 1922 – November 10, 1926 Honourable James Garfield Gardiner Minister of Highways under Charles Avery Dunning [21]
June 14, 1921 – April 5, 1922 Honourable Charles McGill Hamilton Minister of Highways under William Melville Martin [21]
October 20, 1917 – June 14, 1921 Honourable Samuel John Latta Minister of Highways under William Melville Martin [21]
April 2, 1917 – October 20, 1917 Honourable James Alexander Calder Minister of Highways under William Melville Martin [21]
1916 to 1922 None No Department est. under William Melville Martin
1905–1916 Honourable James Alexander Calder Minister of Railways, Telephones and Highways under Thomas Walter Scott [24]

Statistics

Road lengths presently and historically
Type Length Year Source
Railway track: 95,137 kilometres (59,115 mi) 2007 [25]
Highways, roads and streets: 198,239 kilometres (123,180 mi) 2007 [25]
Paved, two-lane: 11,822 kilometres (7,346 mi) 2007 [25]
Paved, four-lane, divided: 2,356 kilometres (1,464 mi) 2007 [25]
Oil treatments: 6,102 kilometres (3,792 mi) 2007 [25]
Gravel and other: 5,752 kilometres (3,574 mi) 2007 [25]
Total Provincial Highways: 26,032 kilometres (16,176 mi) 2007 [25]
Asphalt concrete pavements: 9,249 kilometres (5,747 mi) 2007 [1]
Granular pavements: 4,929 kilometres (3,063 mi) 2007 [1]
Thin membrane surface: 6,102 kilometres (3,792 mi) 2007 [1]
Gravel highways: 5,621 kilometres (3,493 mi) 2007 [1]
Ice roads: 171 kilometres (106 mi) 2007 [1]
Large culverts: 453 kilometres (281 mi) 2007 [1]
Bridges: 805 kilometres (500 mi) 2007 [1]
Ferries: 12 2007 [1]
Northern Airports: 17 2007 [1]
Portland Cement Concrete: 0 1948-49 [26]
Bituminous Pavements: 0 1948-49 [26]
Bituminous Surface: 498 miles (801 km) 1948-49 [26]
Gravel/Crushed Stone: 12,647 miles (20,353 km) 1948-49 [26]
Other Surfaces: 62 miles (100 km) 1948-49 [26]
Total Surfaced Road: 13,207 miles (21,255 km) 1948-49 [26]
Improved Earth: 77,779 miles (125,173 km) 1948-49 [26]
Other Earth Roads: 121,992 miles (196,327 km) 1948-49 [26]
Total Non Surfaced Road: 199,771 miles (321,500 km) 1948-49 [26]
Road Total: 212,978 miles (342,755 km) 1948-49 [26]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Highways and Infrastructure — Government of Saskatchewan". Archived from the original on 2008-02-08. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  2. ^ "Ferry Information". Government of Saskatchewan. Archived from the original on 2007-12-08. Retrieved 2008-11-25.
  3. ^ "Transport Compliance Branch — Highways and Infrastructure — Government of Saskatchewan". March 17, 2008. Archived from the original on July 24, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  4. ^ "Area Transportation Planning Committee — Highways and Infrastructure — Government of Saskatchewan". December 10, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  5. ^ "Community Airport Partnership 2008-09 (CAP) - Highways and Infrastructure — Government of Saskatchewan". January 31, 2008. Archived from the original on October 10, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  6. ^ "Adopt A Highway — Highways and Infrastructure — Government of Saskatchewan". January 21, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  7. ^ Swanson, Ruth; Churchbridge History Committee (2006). "The First Hundred Years: Around Churchbridge, 1880-1980". Our Roots / Nos Racines. University of Calgary, Université Laval. p. 54. Retrieved 2008-02-12.
  8. ^ Sask Biz, Government of Saskatchewan (2004). "Tecumseh No. 65". Retrieved 2007-12-27.
  9. ^ History of Indian Head and District Inc. (2006). Indian Head : history of Indian Head and district. Our Roots Nos Racines. 2006 University of Calgary, Université Laval. p. 9. ISBN 0-919781-26-8.
  10. ^ Moosomin, Saskatchewan. Board of Trade (2006). "Progressive Moosomin, industrial and commercial centre of Saskatchewan". Our Roots Nos Racines. University of Calgary, Université Laval. Archived from the original on 2011-05-16. Retrieved 2008-04-04.
  11. ^ "Sask Biz Gull Lake No 139". Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 2008-04-12.
  12. ^ Quiring, Brett (2006). "Kramer, Eiling (1914–99)". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina. Archived from the original on 2012-03-18. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  13. ^ Nickel, John P. (April 2002). "osler-community-cemetery". The Saskatchewan Mennonite Cemetery Finding Aid. Retrieved 2008-04-12.
  14. ^ Yasinowski, Dwayne (2006). "Douglas, John Taylor (1892–1976)". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. CANADIAN PLAINS RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF REGINA. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  15. ^ C. Stuart Houston (2006). "Stewart, Alan Carl (1893–1958)". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. CANADIAN PLAINS RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF REGINA. Archived from the original on 2011-08-26. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  16. ^ Adapted from Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame (2006). "Spence, George (1880–1975)". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. CANADIAN PLAINS RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF REGINA. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  17. ^ Cousins, Brian (2006). "Transportation". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. CANADIAN PLAINS RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF REGINA. Archived from the original on 2014-05-16. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  18. ^ "Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure Regulations, 2007". The Government Organization Act Chapter G-5.1 Reg 140 (effective November 21, 2007). The Government Organization ActChapter G-5.1 Reg 140 (effective November 21, 2007). 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-19.
  19. ^ a b "Microsoft Word - Ministers.doc" (PDF). SASKATCHEWAN MINISTERS. Saskatchewan Archives. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 28, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-19.
  20. ^ "PAVING BEGINS ON NEW TWINNED LANE ON YELLOWHEAD HIGHWAY". Government of Saskatchewan News Release. May 18, 2000. Archived from the original on June 10, 2011. Retrieved 2008-02-15.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac "Offices held by members of the Ex. Council" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-04-08. Retrieved 2008-04-19.
  22. ^ "SASKATCHEWAN CALLS ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO ASSIST TWINNING NATIONAL HIGHWAYS". Government of Saskatchewan New Release. March 25, 1998. Archived from the original on November 24, 2010. Retrieved 2008-02-15.
  23. ^ Adamson, J (1906). "Canadian Maps: May 1948 Waghorn's Guide. Post Offices in Man. Sask. Alta. and West Ontario". J.R. Waghorn. May 1948, No. 773. Online Historical Map Digitization Project January 5, 2005.
  24. ^ Barnhart, Gordon (2006). "Calder, James Alexander (1868–1956)". Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina. Retrieved 2008-04-19.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g "Saskatchewan Fact Sheet" (PDF). Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics. Saskatchewan Government. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-09-19. Retrieved 2008-02-01.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Howe, C.D., the Right Honourable Minister of Trade and Commerce; Canada Year Book Section, Information Services Division Dominion Bureau of Statistics (1956). "The Canada Year Book 1956 The Official Handbook of Present Conditions and Recent Progress". Ottawa, Ontario: Kings Printer and Controller of Stationery. page 270. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)

External links

This page was last edited on 8 May 2020, at 16:43
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