To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

S-IV
S-IV rocket stage.jpg
Schematics of the S-IV
ManufacturerDouglas Aircraft Company
Country of originUnited States
Used onSaturn I (stage 2)
General characteristics
Height12.19 m (40.0 ft)
Diameter5.49 m (18.0 ft)
Gross mass50,576 kg (111,501 lb)
Propellant mass45,359 kg (100,000 lb)
Empty mass5,217 kg (11,500 lb)
Launch history
StatusRetired
Total launches6
Successes
(stage only)
6
Failed0
First flightJanuary 29, 1964
Last flightJuly 30, 1965
S-IV 100 series
Engines6 RL-10 engines
Thrust400 kN (90,000 lbf)
Specific impulse410 s (4.0 km/s)
Burn time482 s
PropellantLH2 / LOX

The S-IV was the second stage of the Saturn I rocket used by NASA for early flights in the Apollo program.

The S-IV was manufactured by the Douglas Aircraft Company and later modified by them to the S-IVB, a similar but distinct stage used on the Saturn IB and Saturn V rockets.[1]

The S-IV stage was a large LOX/LH2-fueled rocket stage used for the early test flights of the Saturn I rocket. It formed the second stage of the Saturn I and was powered by a cluster of six RL-10A-3 engines. Each one of the engines supplied 66.7 kilonewtons (15,000 lbf) of thrust for a total of about 400 kilonewtons (90,000 lbf). The cryogenic LH2 (liquid hydrogen) and LOX (liquid oxygen) tanks were separated by a common bulkhead. The forward bulkhead of the LOX tank formed the aft bulkhead of the LH2 tank. This saved up to 20% of structural weight.[2][3]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    3 564 446
    1 554 027
    1 845 166
  • Launch of Worlds Largest Rocket - The Delta IV Heavy with NROL-65 Onboard
  • Launch of Worlds Largest Rocket Delta IV Heavy with NROL-37
  • The Biggest Rocket ever Designed? - The Sea Dragon

Transcription

References

  • Bilstein, Roger E. (1999). "6". Stages to Saturn: A Technological History of the Apollo/Saturn Launch. DIANE Publishing. Retrieved 2010-05-04.
  • NASA (April 1975). "Apollo Program Summary Report (Large file)" (PDF).
This page was last edited on 3 April 2020, at 22:52
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.