To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ryder System, Inc.
Public
Traded asNYSER
DJTA component
S&P 400 Component
ISINUS7835491082 Edit this on Wikidata
IndustryTransportation
Founded1933; 87 years ago (1933) in Miami, Florida, U.S.
FounderJames Ryder
HeadquartersMiami, Florida, U.S.
Key people
Robert E. Sanchez
(President & CEO)[1]
Scott Parker
(Executive VP & CFO)
ServicesFleet management
Supply chain management
Dedicated carrier
Cargo truck rental
RevenueIncrease US$ 8.925 billion (2019)
Decrease US$ 341.15 million (2019)
Decrease US$ 24.41 million (2019)
Total assetsDecrease US$ 1.562 billion (2019)
Total equityDecrease US$ 2.476 billion (2019)
Number of employees
39,900 [2] (2019)
Websiteryder.com
Footnotes / references
[3][4]
A 2003–2007 Ryder Ford E-450
A 2003–2007 Ryder Ford E-450
A Ryder DAF LF45 truck in the United Kingdom
A Ryder DAF LF45 truck in the United Kingdom
A Ryder Freightliner Sprinter truck in the United States
A Ryder Freightliner Sprinter truck in the United States
A Ryder Ford Transit van in the United Kingdom
A Ryder Ford Transit van in the United Kingdom

Ryder System, Inc., commonly known as Ryder, is an American provider of transportation and supply chain management products, and is especially known for its fleet of rental trucks.[5]

Ryder specializes in fleet management, supply chain management, and dedicated transportation management. Ryder operates in North America, and the United Kingdom. It has its headquarters in Miami, Florida within Miami-Dade County.

History

Ryder was founded in Miami, Florida in 1933 by James Ryder as a concrete hauling company with one truck, a 1931 Model "A" Ford.[6] In 1938, Ryder signed a five-truck lease deal with Champagne Velvet Beer, increasing Ryder’s fleet to 20 trucks.[7] By the following year, the fleet grew to more than 50 trucks. This led to Ryder changing its focus from distribution to leasing. Ryder bought Great Southern Trucking Company in 1952. In 1955 Ryder System, Inc. was formed to combine Great Southern and Ryder Truck Rental. Ryder System went public in 1955.[8] By the 1960s and 1970s, Ryder had expanded into the distribution and supply chain markets.

James A. Ryder, founder and chairman, retired in 1978 and died in 1997.[6]

In 2008, Ryder acquired three regional competitors: Pollock NationaLease, Lily Transportation and Gator Leasing.[9]

In 2013 Robert E. Sanchez became CEO and Chairman of the company.[10]

In April 2018, Ryder acquired Ohio-based MXD Group, an e-commerce fulfillment and last mile delivery provider with a network of 109 fulfillment centers across the United States and Canada. [11]

In May 2018, Ryder introduced RyderGyde, a commercial fleet management smartphone app for drivers and fleet managers to monitor and manage their fleets. The app allows customers to view the maintenance status of their vehicles, schedule maintenance appointments and compare fuel rates in real-time. [12]

Ryder opened a new logistics center in London, Ontario, Canada in January 2018.[13]

In November 2018 Ryder ordered 1,000 electric trucks to add to their fleet, the largest deal for electric trucks to date in the US.[14]

The company partnered with Fetch robotics to further automate three warehouse locations in Miami, Dallas and Chicago.[15]

The company announced the planned opening of two multi-client facilities in Perris, California and Fort Worth, Texas, while expanding an already existing Ryder warehouse in Douglassville, Pennsylvania. The three facilities were expected to be fully operational by May 2019.[16]

In May 2020 RyderShare was introduced as a collaborative logistics platform.[17][18][19]

In May 2020 the company began to expand its e-commerce network with the opening of a new facility in Philadelphia and adding FDA approval for food-grade service to two other facilities in Perris, California and Dallas, Texas.[20]

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, Ryder took several steps to work with customers to meet increased demand for warehousing and distribution of essential goods, and to support the flow of goods and services required to fight the pandemic.[21]

Partnerships for advanced vehicle technologies

In December 2016 Ryder became the exclusive provider of maintenance and distribution for the hydrogen fuel cell, electric-drive truck of the Nikola Motor Company (NMC).[22] At the end of May 2020 Ryder and Nikola decided to end their service partnership and consider other emerging opportunities in the commercial transportation industry.[23]

As of May 2018 Ryder was working with Tesla Inc. on the development of charging infrastructure for tractors-trailers which were pre-ordered by the company’s fleets.[24] The company is also considering the adoption of more electric vehicles when there is more evidence that the company will spend less on truck maintenance.[25] The company is also examining electric engines in driving situations in which gasoline and diesel engines are less efficient.[26]

In 2018 Ryder reserved 500 Chanje Energy medium-duty electric panel vans for commercial truck rental and the ChoideLease fleet.[27] In November 2018 FedEx announced it was adding 1,000 electric delivery vans to its fleet, buying 100 of them from Chanje Energy Inc, and leasing the additional 900 from Ryder Systems Inc.[28]

In August 2018 Ryder began to use “Uber Central”, a unit of “Uber for Business” to outsource the transportation of customers, drivers, and technicians to and from customer locations.[29][30]

Ryder is the exclusive maintenance provider for Workhorse’s electric fleet in North America. Workhorse introduced the first fleet of all electric cargo vans in the USA in the San Francisco Bay area in 2018.[31][32]

In January 2020 Ryder began a partnership with In-Charge Energy, Inc. and ABB, a provider of industrial automation and technology to provide electric vehicle charging to Ryder’s customers.[33][34]

In June 2020 Ryder began a partnership with Turvo, a provider of collaborative logistics software[35] to launch a digital platform to connect various pieces of the supply chain.[36]

Business

Ryder divides its business into three segments: Fleet Management Solutions, Supply Chain Solutions, and Dedicated Transportation Solutions. As of December 31, 2019, the total company revenue was $8.93 billion,[37] with profits before income taxes of $42.27 million.[38] The number of full-time employees, as of December 2019 was 39,900 globally, with 38,600 in North America and 1,300 in Europe. The company employs approximately 9,500 drivers, 6,300 technicians and have approximately 25,600 hourly employees in the U.S.  About 4,300 of those are organized by labor unions.[39]

Fleet management

Ryder's fleet management business is its largest business segment, accounting for 61% of the company's total revenue of $2.3 billion, or $1.4 billion for Q4 of 2019.[40] This arm of the business does contract-based full-service leasing, contract maintenance, commercial rental and fleet support services. Under full-service leasing Ryder owns and maintains the trucks and the customer decides where they go. In contract maintenance Ryder just takes care of the trucks. Commercial rentals are the white Ryder trucks which the contract customers can rent on a temporary basis. Ryder grew its North American rental fleet to nearly 30,000 vehicles in 2010 and 2011 raising the percentage of model year 2010 or newer vehicles in the fleet to more than 40 percent.[41] Support services consist of insurance, vehicle permits, and fuel. By the end of 2019 the company owned or leased 213,800 vehicles.[39]

In April 2011 Ryder bought B.I.T. Leasing, from Hayward, California.[42] Also in 2011 it acquired the full service leasing and rental business of Carmenita Leasing, Inc., located in Santa Fe Springs, California,[43] and the full service lease, contract maintenance, commercial rental and dedicated contract carriage business, The Scully Companies, Inc., based in Fontana, California.[44]

As of January 2020, Ryder was the largest truck supplier in the USA, with a fleet of 2,500 based in Florida alone.[45]

Launched in April 2018,[46] the company operates a peer-to-peer truck-sharing platform, COOP, that allows owners of commercial vehicles to rent unused trucks and trailers to businesses. The program expanded to Florida in January 2019[47] and further expanded in Texas in February 2020.[48]

As of December 31, 2019, Ryder owned or leased 213,800 vehicles.[39] Ryder sells used trucks,[49][50] with over 5,000 available for sale.[51]

Supply chain

Ryder' supply chain operations accounted for 28% of its revenue for a total of $649 million for Q4 2019.[52] This business consists of management of a customer's supply chain. Ryder managed over 50 million square feet (4,645,152 m2) of warehouse space on December 31, 2019.[39]

In December 2010 Ryder bought TLC, a supply chain services company based in Holland, Michigan.[53]

Dedicated Transportation Solutions

Ryder Dedicated Transportation Solutions accounted for 15% of its revenue for a total of $346 million for Q4 2019.[52] This arm of the business conducts both leasing and supply chain management. In 2013, Ryder launched a new name and identity for this program called Ryder Dedicated.[54] The company expanded its Last Mile Delivery service for bulky and large goods to 11 markets in North America.[55] In February 2019 Ryder launched a program for e-commerce that allows manufacturers to ship directly to consumers instead of using third-party shipping for small to large products.[56] In May 2020 the company added food-grade capabilities to its e-commerce service.[57]

Rental trucks

Ryder launched a consumer truck-rental operation in 1968 with 1,000 trucks and vans. These were the yellow trucks known as "one-ways" and available for the public to rent from filling stations and other automotive-service locations. In June 1998, Ryder decided to focus on commercial truck rental and leasing, and exited the "one-way" business arena; which it sold to Budget Truck Rental.[58]

In 2017 Ryder launched electric truck rentals in California, and Chicago, Illinois. The trucks were equipped with 70kWh batteries, which had an estimated range of 100 miles, just under the smallest battery in a Tesla S model.[59]

Headquarters

Ryder's headquarters are located in an unincorporated area in northwest Miami-Dade County, Florida, near the Miami Dade-County, Broward County boundary line.[60][61]

Previously Ryder had its headquarters in Doral, Florida.[62] In 2002, after taking a year-long study of 22 potential headquarters sites in South Florida, Ryder announced that it would move its headquarters to another location in northwest Miami-Dade County. As a result of the move, the commute times of around 200 employees who resided in Broward County decreased. Before the announcement of the final headquarters site, Ryder considered some locations in Miramar in Broward County.[61] In 2005 Shoma Development Corp. began demolishing the former Ryder headquarters in Doral, replacing it with the Park Square at Doral development.[63]

Ryder also has a Shared Services Center in Alpharetta, GA[64] that employs over 500 people and provides support to all FMS operations.

Locations

Headquartered in Miami, as of December 31, 2019, Ryder had 524 locations in 50 US States and Puerto Rico.[39]

Criticism

In December 2011, the non-partisan organization Public Campaign criticized Ryder for spending $0.96 million on lobbying and not paying any taxes during 2008–2010, instead getting $46 million in tax rebates, despite making a profit of $627 million.[65]

References

Notes
  1. ^ "Robert E. Sanchez". Bloomberg. Retrieved 14 July 2020.
  2. ^ "SEC Form 10-K". SEC.GOV. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  3. ^ "Ryder Media Resources". Ryder System, Inc. Archived from the original on April 5, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017.
  4. ^ Financial Statements
  5. ^ "Ryder System Inc Company Profile". Reuters. Archived from the original on May 28, 2008. Retrieved August 8, 2008.
  6. ^ a b "Ryder History". Ryder System, Inc. Archived from the original on December 29, 2006. Retrieved August 7, 2008.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-07-16. Retrieved 2018-07-16.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Ryder System, Inc. Company History". Funding Universe. Archived from the original on January 23, 2012. Retrieved May 7, 2011.
  9. ^ Writer, Sarah Talalay Staff. "Ryder buys trucking firm Gator Leasing". Sun-Sentinel.com. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  10. ^ Parker, Garrett (2019-06-07). "10 Things You Didn't Know about Ryder System CEO Robert E. Sanchez". Money Inc. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  11. ^ "Ryder Acquires Last-Mile Delivery Carrier MXD Group". Transport Topics. 2018-04-03. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  12. ^ "Ryder Introduces New Commercial Management Fleet App". Transport Topics. 2018-05-23. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  13. ^ "Ryder opens new logistics center in Ontario". Truck News. 2018-01-03. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  14. ^ Louis, Billy Jean (20 November 2018). "Ryder places order for 1,000 electric trucks". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  15. ^ "Ryder adds automation at 3 warehouse locations". Supply Chain Dive. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  16. ^ "Ryder opens new facilities for latest e-commerce offering". www.ccjdigital.com. 12 February 2019. Retrieved 2020-07-28.
  17. ^ Smith, Jennifer (2020-05-27). "Companies Lean on Freight Technology to Untangle Scrambled Supply Chains". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  18. ^ "Ryder Introduces RyderShare Digital Platform for Collaborative Supply Chains". Food Logistics. 2020-05-27. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  19. ^ "Today's Pickup: Ryder leverages Turvo for new technology platform". FreightWaves. 2020-06-01. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  20. ^ "Ryder rolls out increased last mile and food-grade capabilities". www.logisticsmgmt.com. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  21. ^ "Ryder Supports Customers in COVID-19 Response". MarketWatch. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  22. ^ Cannon, Jason (1 December 2016). "Ryder inks deal to provide sales, maintenance for Nikola One tractor". www.ccjdigital.com. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  23. ^ "Nikola, Ryder terminate exclusive partnership". Truck News. 2020-06-01. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  24. ^ "Charging All-Electric Trucks". Transport Topics. 2018-05-11. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  25. ^ Cannon, Jason (15 May 2018). "Electric truck maintenance will require 'higher skilled labor' but 'lower number of hours'". www.ccjdigital.com. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  26. ^ Cannon, Jason (14 May 2018). "Electrification: The final mile frontier". www.hardworkingtrucks.com. Retrieved 2020-08-04.
  27. ^ Staff, A. F. (8 June 2018). "Ryder Orders 500 Chanje Electric Vans". www.automotive-fleet.com. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  28. ^ Smith, Jennifer (2018-11-20). "FedEx to Add 1,000 Electric Vehicles to Parcel Fleet". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  29. ^ "Ryder Uses Uber Central to Boost Customer Service". Transport Topics. 2018-08-07. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  30. ^ "Ryder partners with Uber unit for outsourced transport services". www.dcvelocity.com. 7 August 2018. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  31. ^ "Ryder partners with Workhorse Group". www.fleetowner.com. 3 May 2017. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  32. ^ Kane, Mark (30 March 2018). "Workhorse N-GEN Electric Van Hits The Road". InsideEVs. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  33. ^ "Companies partner to advance electric vehicle charging solutions". www.dcvelocity.com. 2 January 2020. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  34. ^ Adler, Alan (2020-01-02). "Ryder partners to build up electric vehicle infrastructure". FreightWaves. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  35. ^ "Turvo Partners with Ryder for Real-Time Visibility and Collaboration". www.dcvelocity.com. 4 June 2020. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  36. ^ Straight, Brian (2020-06-01). "Today's Pickup: Ryder leverages Turvo for new technology platform". FreightWaves. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  37. ^ "Ryder System Revenue 2006-2020 | R". www.macrotrends.net. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  38. ^ "Ryder System, Inc". dun & bradstreet. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  39. ^ a b c d e "SEC Annual Report" (PDF). UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Form 10-K. 31 December 2019. p. 27. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  40. ^ "Ryder Reports Record Revenue of $8.9 Billion in 2019, Up 6.1%; Earnings Include Previously Announced Residual Value Change Impact". investors.ryder.com. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  41. ^ "Ryder Expands and Refreshes Its Rental Fleet with 6,700 New Trucks, Tractors, and Trailers". www.businesswire.com. Archived from the original on 2017-10-12. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  42. ^ "Ryder Acquires Portfolio of B.I.T. Leasing". Archived from the original on 2017-10-12. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  43. ^ "About Ryder". Archived from the original on 2006-12-29. Retrieved 2008-08-07.
  44. ^ "Ryder completes acquisition of The Scully Companies Inc". www.logisticsmgmt.com. Archived from the original on 2016-04-21. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  45. ^ Wile, Rob (31 January 2020). "By land, sea and air, Super Bowl-bound snowbirds are landing — and spending". Miami Herald. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  46. ^ "Ryder launches Airbnb-like sharing platform for truck equipment". FreightWaves. 2018-04-02. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  47. ^ Huff, Aaron (24 January 2019). "Ryder expands truck sharing platform to Florida". www.ccjdigital.com. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  48. ^ "Ryder Expands Truck-Sharing Program COOP". Transport Topics. 2020-02-03. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  49. ^ "COVID comeback: Ryder launches used truck relief program; Hino offers no payment, no interest". www.hardworkingtrucks.com. 9 June 2020. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  50. ^ "Average Used Class 8 Costs More in October as Sales Climb". Transport Topics. 2018-11-28. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  51. ^ "Ryder Locations | USA, Canada, UK". ryder.com. Retrieved 2020-07-09.
  52. ^ a b "Ryder Reports Record Revenue of $8.9 Billion in 2019, Up 6.1%; Earnings Include Previously Announced Residual Value Change Impact". investors.ryder.com. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  53. ^ "Ryder acquires big Holland-based warehouser with 2,500 employees nationwide". MLive.com. Archived from the original on 2017-10-12. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  54. ^ "Ryder Relaunches Dedicated Transportation Solution". investors.ryder.com. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  55. ^ "Ryder rolls out last-mile expansion plans". www.logisticsmgmt.com. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  56. ^ "Ryder announces e-commerce fulfillment solution". Supply Chain Dive. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  57. ^ "Ryder Expands E-Commerce Fulfillment Network with Food-Grade Capabilities and Additional Locations as Consumer Trends Evolve". www.businesswire.com. 2020-05-20. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  58. ^ "Truck Rental and Leasing Without Drivers market report | HighBeam Business: Arrive Prepared". business.highbeam.com. Archived from the original on 2010-10-28. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  59. ^ "Ryder will start renting electric vans in New York, California, and Illinois". The Verge. Archived from the original on 2017-11-03. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  60. ^ "Contact Us Archived 2010-01-08 at the Wayback Machine." Ryder. Retrieved on January 9, 2010.
  61. ^ a b Tamen, Joan Fleischer. "Ryder Headquarters to be Located Near Broward County, Fla., Border." South Florida Sun-Sentinel. December 5, 2002. Retrieved on January 9, 2010.
  62. ^ "Contact Ryder." Ryder. February 29, 2000. Retrieved on January 9, 2010.
  63. ^ "Urban Living Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine." Miami Herald. August 12, 2005. 1C Business. Retrieved on January 9, 2010.
  64. ^ "Ryder+Shared+Services+Center in Alpharetta, Georgia | Business Profile | Infofree.com". Infofree. Retrieved 2020-07-20.
  65. ^ Portero, Ashley. "30 Major U.S. Corporations Paid More to Lobby Congress Than Income Taxes, 2008–2010". International Business Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2012. Retrieved December 26, 2011.
Bibliography
  • Saunders, Harris. Top Up or Down? The Origin and Development of the Automobile and Truck Renting and Leasing Industry -- 56 Years, 1916–1972. Birmingham, AL: Harris Saunders, 1972.
  • "2008 Annual Report" (PDF). Ryder System. Retrieved February 15, 2011.

External links

This page was last edited on 12 August 2020, at 07:34
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.