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Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Royal Hospital for Children
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and the Royal Hospital for Children (geograph 5722485) (cropped).jpg
Royal Hospital for Children,
Location within Glasgow
Geography
LocationShieldhall, Glasgow, Scotland
Coordinates55°51′46″N 4°20′34″W / 55.862813°N 4.342642°W / 55.862813; -4.342642
Organisation
Affiliated universityUniversity of Glasgow
Services
Beds256
History
Opened2015
Links
Other linksList of hospitals in Scotland

The Royal Hospital for Children is a 256-bed hospital specialising in paediatric healthcare for children and young people up to the age of their 16th birthday. The hospital is part of the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and is built on the site of the former Southern General Hospital, in Govan and opened in June 2015. The hospital replaced the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Yorkhill. It is managed by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

History

The Royal Hospital for Children, like the adjacent Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, was designed by Nightingale Associates,[1] with construction carried out by Brookfield Multiplex, who previously built Wembley Stadium.[2] The new hospital was built on the site of the old Southern General Hospital. In January 2010, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde closed the Queen Mother's Maternity Hospital at Yorkhill, with maternity services relocating to the Southern General Hospital.[3]

Construction started in early 2011.[4] Originally to be called Royal Hospital for Sick Children,[5] it was named Royal Hospital for Children.[6][7] It was originally hoped the new hospital would be ready by 2014,[8] but medical services did not start to be transferred until 10 June 2015.[9]

Design

The new children's hospital is a mix of four-bedded and single-bedded accommodation.[10] The design included a part covered roof garden[11] where it was intended that young patients would be able to enjoy a range of activities in the fresh air. In 2016 the roof garden play area was closed amid health and safety concerns.[12]

The hospital has a 47-seat cinema, which was built in partnership with MediCinema costing around £250,000 to install.[13] In addition to the 47 seats the facility serves patients in wheelchairs and beds.[14]

Services

The Royal Hospital for Children, while retaining a somewhat separate identity from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, is adjoined and integrated with the adult hospital. With 256 beds and 5 floors, it replaced the Royal Hospital for Sick Children located in Yorkhill, Glasgow.[15]

References

  1. ^ "Wembley touch for super hospital". news.bbc.co.uk. BBC News. 6 November 2009. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  2. ^ "Inside Scotland's new £900million super-hospital - days before first patients arrive". dailyrecord.co.uk. Daily Record. 19 April 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  3. ^ "Last baby to be born at maternity unit meets the first as Queen Mum's closes its doors after 46 years". Daily Record (Scotland). 14 January 2010. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  4. ^ "South Glasgow Hospital Campus". Clyde Waterfront. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  5. ^ "A look inside Glasgow's new Royal Hospital for Sick Children". news.stv.tv. STV News. 23 March 2015. Archived from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  6. ^ "Glasgow's newest hospital to be named after Queen Elizabeth". heraldscotland.com. The Herald. 3 July 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  7. ^ "New South Glasgow hospital named after Queen Elizabeth". bbc.co.uk/news. BBC News. 3 July 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  8. ^ "Super hospital delay 'the new Holyrood'". news.bbc.co.uk. BBC News. 25 November 2009. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  9. ^ "End of an era as Yorkhill shuts its doors to emergency patients". eveningtimes.co.uk. Evening Times. 11 June 2015. Archived from the original on 26 December 2020. Retrieved 11 December 2015.
  10. ^ "NHSGGC : Royal Hospital For Sick Children". nhsggc.org.uk. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  11. ^ "State-of-the-art cinema opens in new children's hospital". glasgow.stv.tv/. STV. 5 August 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  12. ^ "New Queen Elizabeth University Hospital's play zone is no go area for kids". heraldscotland.com. The Herald (Glasgow). 9 May 2016. Archived from the original on 19 August 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  13. ^ "Sick kids watch Minions as £250k Medicinema opens at new superhospital". dailyrecord.co.uk. Daily Record. 5 August 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  14. ^ "Yorkhill MediCinema given funding boost". eveningtimes.co.uk. Evening Times. 5 November 2015. Archived from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  15. ^ "What does new hospital mean for Glasgow?". bbc.co.uk/news. BBC News. 27 January 2015. Archived from the original on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
This page was last edited on 27 May 2021, at 19:33
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