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Ron Perranoski

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ron Perranoski
Portrait of baseball player Ron Perranoski ca1960 (cropped).jpg
Pitcher
Born: (1936-04-01)April 1, 1936
Paterson, New Jersey
Died: October 2, 2020(2020-10-02) (aged 84)
Vero Beach, Florida
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 14, 1961, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
June 17, 1973, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Win–loss record79–74
Earned run average2.79
Strikeouts687
Saves178
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Ronald Peter Perranoski (April 1, 1936 – October 2, 2020) was a Major League Baseball left-handed relief pitcher, who played from 1961 through 1973.

In 1963, Perranoski won 16 of 19 relief decisions for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who went on to win that year's World Series in four consecutive games over the New York Yankees. He appeared in Game Two of that Series and earned a save in relief of Johnny Podres.

Perranoski grew up in Fair Lawn, New Jersey,[1] where he attended Fair Lawn High School.[2]

Perranoski attended Michigan State University, where he was a teammate and friend of Dick Radatz, who also would become a standout reliever in the 1960s. After his playing career ended, Perranoski was the Dodgers' minor league pitching coordinator (1973–80), then the MLB pitching coach for Los Angeles for 14 seasons (1981–94). He joined the San Francisco Giants as minor league pitching coordinator in 1995, was promoted to bench coach in 1997 and then to pitching coach in 1998-99. He had been a special assistant to general manager Brian Sabean since 2000.

In 1983, Perranoski was inducted into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame.[3]

In 1965, Perranoski appeared in an episode of the television series Branded ("Coward Step Aside", S1, Ep 7) with former baseball player and series star Chuck Connors.[4]

Perranoski died in his home in Vero Beach, Florida, on October 2, 2020, following complications from a long illness.[5][6]

Transactions

See also

References

  1. ^ Finch, Frank (June 7, 1964). "Sluggers Benched, So Dodgers Jar Mets 9-2". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 29, 2011. Several thousand fans from Fair Lawn, NJ, were on hand to honor their most celebrated citizen, Ron Perranoski
  2. ^ Schwartz, Paul (October 24, 2007). "Bob Potts dead at 73; Fair Lawn native heart and soul of Met League". The Record (Bergen County). In 1954, as a 17-year-old Fair Lawn High School student, Potts established the Fair Lawn Athletic Club baseball team to give himself and his friends a chance to play summer baseball. The team soon became the Paterson and later the Clifton Phillies, which was one of the most successful teams of its kind in the country until it folded in 1999. Among the first players on the Phillies was Potts' high school teammate, Ron Perranoski, who later starred as a relief pitcher on several Los Angeles Dodgers world championship teams.
  3. ^ "Ron Perranoski – NPASHF". Polishsportshof.com. June 9, 1983. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  4. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0531266/
  5. ^ Former Dodgers lefty Perranoski dies at 84
  6. ^ Cole, Howard (October 3, 2020). "Dodgers Relief Great Ron Perranoski Passes Away". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on October 4, 2020.
  7. ^ Joyce, Dick. "L.A. Trades Roseboro to Twins," United Press International (UPI), Wednesday, November 29, 1967. Retrieved April 18, 2020

External links


Preceded by
Red Adams
Los Angeles Dodgers Pitching Coach
1981–1994
Succeeded by
Dave Wallace
This page was last edited on 20 January 2021, at 05:10
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