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Roman Catholic Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi

Dioecesis Oppidensis-Palmarum
Cattedrale di Oppido Mamertina.jpg
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceReggio Calabria-Bova
Statistics
Area930 km2 (360 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2013)
187,200 (est.)
180,200 (est.) (96.3%)
Parishes66
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established13th century
CathedralCattedrale di Maria SS. Assunta (Oppido Mamertina)
Co-cathedralConcattedrale di S. Nicola (Palmi)
Secular priests86 (diocesan)
11 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopFrancesco Milito
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi in Italy.svg
Website
www.diocesimileto.it/

The Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi (Latin: Dioecesis Oppidensis-Palmarum) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in southern Italy, existing under that name since 1979. Historically it was the Diocese of Oppido Marmertina (Oppidensis).[1][2] It is a suffragan see of the Archdiocese of Reggio Calabria.[3]

History

Bishop Stefano (1295) is the first prelate of whom there is mention. The Chapter of the Cathedral already existed in the 13th century. The Chapter maintained its right to elect a new bishop until 1338.[4] The Chapter was composed of six dignities (the Archdeacon, the Dean, the Cantor, the Treasurer, the Archpriest, and the Ecclesiarch-Theologian) and fourteen Canons.[5]

In 1472 the see was united to that of Gerace, under Bishop Athanasius Calceofilo, by whom the Greek Rite was abolished, although it remained in use in a few towns.

In 1536 Oppido became again an independent see, under Bishop Pietro Andrea Ripanti; among other bishops were Antonio Cesconi (1609) and Giovanni Battista Montani (1632), who restored the cathedral and the episcopal palace; Bisanzio Fili (1696), who founded the seminary; Michele Caputo (1852), who was transferred to the See of Ariano, where it is suspected that he poisoned King Ferdinand II; eventually, he apostatized.

In 1748 the town of Oppido is estimated to have had 2,000 inhabitants.[6] The town was heavily damaged by the earthquakes of 1783, in the first of which Oppido was at the epicenter,[7] and the population decimated by the plague that followed.[8]

In 2007 the town had some 5,484 inhabitants.

Bishops

Diocese of Oppido Mamertina

Erected: 13th Century
Latin Name: Oppidensis
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Reggio Calabria

to 1471

  • Stephanus
  • Gregorius (1 March 1339 – 1349)[9]
  • Barnabas (18 May 1349 – 1351)[10]
  • Nicolaus
  • Antonius
  • Stephanus
  • Simon
  • Ioannes Malatesta (3 June 1394 – 1400)[11]
  • Simeon
  • Antonio de Caroleis (23 July 1423 – 25 February 1429)[12]
  • Tommaso Rubertus (18 March 1429 – 23 December 1429)[13]
  • Venturello de Nubiel (13 February 1430 – 1449)[14]
  • Girolamo, O.E.S.A. (1 September 1449 – 1471)[15]

1536 to 1700

...
  • Pietro Andrea Ripanti (28 Jan 1536 – 2 Sep 1536 Died)[16]
  • Alessandro Cesarini (Sr.) (2 Sep 1536 – 20 Feb 1538 Resigned)[17]
  • Ascanio Cesarini (20 Feb 1538 – 1542 Resigned)[18]
  • Francesco de Noctucis (5 Jul 1542 – 1548 Died)[19]
  • Tommaso Caselli, O.P. (7 May 1548 – 3 Oct 1550)[20]
  • Vincenzo Spinelli (3 Oct 1550 – 1561 Resigned)[21]
  • Teofilo Galluppi (10 Mar 1561 – 13 Apr 1567 Died)[22]
  • Giovan Mario de Alessandris (19 Sep 1567 – 9 Feb 1573)[23]
  • Sigismondo Mangiaruga (1573–1583 Died)[24]
  • Andrea Canuto (28 Nov 1583 – 1603 Resigned)[25]
  • Giulio Ruffo (12 Sep 1605 – 1609 Died)[26]
  • Antonio Cesonio (2 Dec 1609 – 1629 Died)[27]
  • Fabrizio Caracciolo Piscizi (28 Jan 1630 – 1631 Died)[28]
  • Giovanni Battista Pontano (Giovanni Battista Montano)(19 Jan 1632 – May 1662 Died)[29]
  • Paolo Diano-Parisi (12 Mar 1663 – Nov 1673 Died)[30]
  • Vincenzo Ragni, O.S.B. (19 Feb 1674 – 3 Dec 1693 Died)[31]
  • Bernardino Plastina, O.M. (25 Jan 1694 – 16 Feb 1697 Died)[32]
  • Bisanzio Fili (27 Jan 1698 – 11 Apr 1707)[33]

since 1700

Co-cathedral in Palmi
Co-cathedral in Palmi
  • Giuseppe Placido De Pace (1 Aug 1707 – 5 Jan 1709 Died)[34]
  • Giuseppe Maria Perrimezzi, O.Minim. (26 Feb 1714 – 18 Feb 1734 Resigned)[35]
  • Leone Luca Vita (15 Feb 1734 – 24 Oct 1747 Died)[36]
  • Ferdinando Mandarini (29 Jan 1748 – 9 Nov 1769 Died)[37]
  • Nicola Spedalieri (29 Jan 1770 – 5 Apr 1783 Died)[38]
  • Alessandro Tommasini (26 Mar 1792 Confirmed – 25 May 1818[39]
  • Ignazio Greco (4 Jun 1819 Confirmed – 4 Feb 1822 Died)[40]
  • Francesco-Maria Coppola (19 Apr 1822 Confirmed – 11 Dec 1851 Died)[41]
  • Michele Caputo, O.P. (27 Sep 1852 Confirmed – 27 Sep 1858[42]
  • Giuseppe Teta (20 Jun 1859 Confirmed – 11 Feb 1875 Died)[43]
  • Antonio Maria Curcio (11 Feb 1875 Succeeded – 15 Jul 1898 Died)[44]
  • Domenico Scopelliti (28 Nov 1898 – 15 Dec 1919 Resigned)[45]
  • Antonio Galati (15 Dec 1919 – 1 Jul 1927 Appointed, Archbishop of Santa Severina)
  • Giuseppe Antonio Caruso (26 Aug 1927 – 6 Jul 1928 Resigned)
  • Giovanni Battista Peruzzo, C.P. (19 Oct 1928 – 15 Jan 1932 Appointed, Bishop of Agrigento)
  • Nicola Colangelo (4 Apr 1932 – 16 Dec 1935 Appointed, Bishop of Nardò)
  • Nicola Canino (30 Dec 1936 – 11 Apr 1951 Resigned)
  • Maurizio Raspini (9 May 1953 – 6 Jan 1965 Resigned)
  • Santo Bergamo (18 Nov 1971 – 11 Oct 1980 Died)

Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi

10 June 1979: Name Changed

References

  1. ^ "Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. retrieved March 24, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved March 24, 2016
  3. ^ Umberto Benigni. "Oppido Mamertina." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. retrieved: 2016-10-11.
  4. ^ Zerbi, pp. 98-99.
  5. ^ D'Avino, pp. 505-506.
  6. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 318, note 1.
  7. ^ Sandro Leanza (1999). Calabria cristiana: società, religione, cultura nel territorio della diocesi di Oppido Mamertina-Palmi (in Italian). Soveria Mannelli (Catanzaro): Rubbettino. p. 444.
  8. ^ D'Avino, p. 507, column 2.
  9. ^ Eubel, I, p. 377.
  10. ^ Barnabas had been Abbot of the monastery of S. Maria de Trajecto. Eubel, I, p. 377 with note 2.
  11. ^ Giovanni had been Cantor in the Cathedral Chapter of Tropea. Eubel, I, p. 377.
  12. ^ Antonio was transferred to the diocese of Bisignano on 25 February 1429. Eubel, I, p. 136; 377.
  13. ^ Tommaso was transferred to the diocese of Strongoli on 23 December 1429. Eubel, I, pp. 377, 465.
  14. ^ Venturello was a Doctor of Canon Law, and had been a Brother of the Hospital of Santo Spirito in Sassia in Rome. Gams, p. 909. Eubel, I, p. 377, with n. 4.
  15. ^ Girolamo was a Master of 'the Sacred Page' (biblical literature?). In 1472 the diocese of Oppido was suppressed, and its territory added to the diocese of Gerace. Ughelli, IX, p. 419. Eubel, I, p. 377; II, p. 207.
  16. ^ Ughelli, p. 420. Eubel, III, p. 262.
  17. ^ Ughelli, p. 420. Eubel, III, p. 262, with n. 2.
  18. ^ Ascanius, who was born illegitimate and required a dispensation to receive Holy Orders, was consecrated a bishop in Rome by the papal Sacristan Alfonso Oliva, on 3 May 1540. Ughelli, p. 420.
  19. ^ Francesco de Notucis had been Archdeacon of Mileto before his election to the bishopric. Ughelli, p. 420. Zerbi, pp. 245–247, 251. Eubel, III, p. 263.
  20. ^ Caselli was appointed Bishop of Cava (de’ Tirreni) on 3 October 1550. Zerbi, pp. 253–257. Eubel, III, pp. 161, 263.
  21. ^ Spinelli: Zerbi, pp. 259–263.
  22. ^ Galluppi: Zerbi, pp. 265–271. Eubel, III, p. 263.
  23. ^ De Alessandris was appointed Bishop of Mileto (1573–1585). Zerbi, pp. 273–275. Eubel, III, pp. 263, 244.
  24. ^ Mangiaruga: Zerbi, pp. 277–282. Eubel, III, p. 163.
  25. ^ Canuto had been a priest of the diocese of Fermo. Zerbi, pp. 283–285. Eubel, III, p. 263.
  26. ^ Ruffo: Zerbi, pp. 287–288. Gauchat, IV, p. 264 with note 3.
  27. ^ Cesonio: Zerbi, pp. 289–297. Gauchat, IV, p. 264 with note 4.
  28. ^ Caracciolo had been Bishop of Catanzaro (1619–1629). Ughelli, p. 421. Zerbi, pp. 299–300. Gauchat, p. 141 with note 3; 264 with note 5.
  29. ^ Montano was a native of Pescara, in the duchy of Urbino. He was Archdeacon of Pescara. Zerbi, pp. 301–305. Gauchat, IV, p. 264 with note 6.
  30. ^ Diano-Parisi: Zerbi, pp. 307–309. Gauchat, IV, p. 264 with note 7.
  31. ^ Ragni: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 297 with note 2.
  32. ^ A native of Fuscaldo (Cosentina, Calabria), Plastina was a member of the Minims of S. Francesco di Paola. He was elected Vicar General of the Italian Province, and then Corrector General of his Order in 1674. He was appointed Qualificator of the Holy Office (Inquisition) in Palermo. He was elected General of his Order. Plastina was consecrated in Rome on 3 January 1694 by Cardinal Pietro Petrucci. He died on 16 February 1697. Zerbi, pp. 315–316. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 297 with note 3.
  33. ^ Fili was born in Altamura (Bari) in 1656. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the Sapienza in Rome (1678). He was named Vicar General of Altamura, and then Vicar General and Canon of the Cathedral of Trani. He was appointed Vicar General of Bitonto, and finally Cantor Major of Altamura. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Bandino Panciatico on 2 February 1698. He was transferred to the diocese of Ostuni on 11 April 1707. He died in April 1720. Zerbi, pp. 317–321, 335-337. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 299, with note 4; 297 with note 4.
  34. ^ De Pace: D'Avino, p. 509. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 297 with note 5.
  35. ^ Perrimezzi had previously been Bishop of Ravello and Scara (1707–1718): D'Avino, p. 510. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 297 with note 6.
  36. ^ Vita: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 318 with note 2.
  37. ^ Mandarini: D'Avino, p. 510. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 318 with note 3.
  38. ^ Spedalieri: D'Avino, p. 510. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 318 with note 4.
  39. ^ Tommasini was transferred to the diocese of Reggio Calabria on 25 May 1818. He died in 1827. Gams, pp. 909, 917. D'Avino, p. 510. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 318 with note 5.
  40. ^ Greco: D'Avino, p. 510. Gams, p. 919.
  41. ^ Coppola was a Neapolitan patrician and a native of Nicotera. Zerbi, pp. 411–446. Gams, p. 919. D'Avino, p. 510.
  42. ^ Caputo had been a Canon of Nicotero. He was appointed Bishop of Ariano.
  43. ^ Teta was born in Nusco (Avellino) in 1817, and became a priest of the diocese of Nusco. He held a Licenciate in theology. He was Archpriest Curate of the Cathedral of Nusco, and Synodical Examiner.
  44. ^ Curcio, a native of Pizzo (diocese of Mileto) was a priest of the diocese of Mileto, and then Archpriest of the Collegiate Church of Pizzo. He was a Doctor in theology. He was Auditor of the Curia of the diocese of Mileto, and Vicar Forane. He was named a Synodal Judge. He was appointed titular Bishop of Alalia, and named Coadjutor with the right of succession to Bishop Giuseppe Teta of Oppido. La Civiltà Cattolica. nona serie (in Italian). Vol. 5, anno vigesimosesto. Civiltà Cattolica. 1875. p. 101. Curcio had an auxiliary bishop in 1895, Mauro Nardi, O.Min.Cap. Taccone-Gallucci, p. 418.
  45. ^ Scopelliti was born in Catona (diocese of Reggio Calabria) in 1841. He had been Archdeacon of Catona. A. Battandier (ed.), Annuaire pontifical catholique (1905), p. 227. Annuario pontificio (Roma 1919), p. 175.

Bibliography

Reference works

Studies

This page was last edited on 22 December 2020, at 03:30
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