To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Robert Wilcox (actor)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert Wilcox
Born(1910-05-10)May 10, 1910
DiedJune 11, 1955(1955-06-11) (aged 45)
New York City, U.S.
Resting placeRiverside Cemetery in Rochester
OccupationActor
Years active1936–1954
Spouse(s)
(m. 1937; div. 1939)

(m. 1950)

Robert Wilcox (May 19, 1910 – June 11, 1955) was an American film and theater actor of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.

Personal life

Wilcox was born in Rochester, New York, the son of Dr. Roscoe Squires Wilcox of Rochester, who died when Wilcox was 16.[1][2] He attended Nazareth Hall Academy and John Marshall High School in Rochester.[2]

He was married twice. His first wife, whom he married in 1937 and divorced two years later. was Florence Rice, daughter of sportswriter Grantland Rice.[3] He married Diana Barrymore in 1950.[citation needed] The five-year marriage, which ended with his death, was stormy, with repeated separations, reconciliations and police calls for domestic disturbances.[4] Barrymore chronicled their bouts with alcoholism in her 1957 autobiography, Too Much, Too Soon, which she dedicated to him.[citation needed]

Acting career

He started his career with a Buffalo, New York, Community Theater Group.[2] His career began in earnest in 1936 after being signed by a Universal Pictures talent scout while playing Duke Mantee in a summer-stock production of The Petrified Forest.[2][3] Wilcox worked in 18 Hollywood films before World War II, starting with the role of the Intern in Let Them Live.[5] (Another source states that he played the romantic lead in 26 films, before going into the service for World War II.[2]) He was a contract player with Universal Studios, unhappy with his typecasting in "cops and robbers" roles.[5] He is perhaps best known for playing Bob Wayne and his alter ego, "The Copperhead", in the 1940 film serial Mysterious Doctor Satan.[6]

He was inducted into the United States Army February 27, 1942.[7] He served 38 months in the United States Army during World War II, rising from private to the rank of captain, and seeing action in Belgium, France and Germany.[5][8] Following the war, he returned to Rochester, and appeared in an amateur production of Soldier's Wife, a quiet comedy by Rose Franken about a veteran returning from the Pacific, presented in January 1946 by the Rochester Community Players.[5] Wilcox, according to a contemporary news report, was considering whether to go back to Hollywood or to work in professional theater.[5] his post-war work was mostly on the stage.[4]

His last stage performance was in the road show Pajama Top, costarring his wife, Diana Barrymore.[9] The production, an English translation of the French comic success, Moumou, was directed by Leonard Altobell (also a native of Rochester) and opened its national tour at the Auditorium Theater in Rochester November 8, 1954.[2]

Death

Wilcox died of a heart attack on June 11, 1955, while riding a train from New York City to Rochester to visit his mother.[4][9] A porter discovered his body in a Pullman berth when he tried to wake the actor at the Rochester train station stop.[9] He was 45 years old. He is buried at Riverside Cemetery.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Letter to the Editor of the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle newspaper, January 1946; archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library
  2. ^ a b c d e f Article by Hamilton B. Allen, Rochester Times Union newspaper, October 27, 1954; archived in the 1954-1955 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library
  3. ^ a b Wollstein, Hans J. "Excerpt from Allmovie hosted on Fandango". Retrieved 2007-10-20.
  4. ^ a b c Obituary. Sarasota Herald Tribune June 13, 1955, pg. 12
  5. ^ a b c d e Article, Democrat and Chronicle newspaper, Rochester NY: "Footlights? Film? Actor must decide", January 1946; archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library
  6. ^ https://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Doctor-Satan-Eduardo-Ciannelli/dp/6300208788
  7. ^ New York Times, February 28, 1942
  8. ^ "Wilcox, Back from War, Takes Lead Role in "Soldier's Wife"; newspaper article January 1946, archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library
  9. ^ a b c New York Times obituary, June 12, 1955

External links

This page was last edited on 3 October 2021, at 21:45
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.