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Risiera di San Sabba

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Risiera di San Sabba
Concentration camp
Risiera di San Sabba 2.JPG
Internal courtyard of the Risiera di San Sabba. The remains of the crematorium can be seen on the wall.
Location of Risiera di San Sabba within Italy
Coordinates45°37′15″N 13°47′21″E / 45.62083°N 13.78917°E / 45.62083; 13.78917Coordinates: 45°37′15″N 13°47′21″E / 45.62083°N 13.78917°E / 45.62083; 13.78917
LocationTrieste, Italian Social Republic
Operated bySS
InmatesItalian Political prisoners, Italian Jews, Yugoslavian Resistance fighters and Yugoslavian civilians (primarily Slovenes and Croats)
Killed3,000-5,000
Notable inmatesBoris Pahor

Risiera di San Sabba (Slovene: Rižarna) is a five-storey brick-built compound located in Trieste, northern Italy, that functioned during World War II as a Nazi concentration camp for the detention and killing of political prisoners, and a transit camp for Jews, most of whom were then deported to Auschwitz.[1] SS members Odilo Globočnik and Karl Frenzel, and Ivan Marchenko are all said to have participated in the killings at this camp. The cremation facilities, the only ones built inside a concentration camp in Italy, were installed by Erwin Lambert, and were destroyed before the camp was liberated. Today, the former concentration camp operates as a civic museum.[2]

Background

The building was erected in 1913 and first used as a rice-husking facility (hence the name "Risiera"). During World War II, German occupation forces in Trieste used the building to transport, detain and exterminate prisoners. Many occupants of Risiera di San Sabba were transported to the German Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in Occupied Poland.[3] Historians[who?] estimate that over 3,000 people were killed at the Risiera camp and thousands more imprisoned and transported elsewhere. The majority of prisoners came from Friuli, the Julian March and the Province of Ljubljana.[citation needed]

Boris Pahor was also held at the camp before being transported to the concentration camps of Dachau and Natzweiler-Struthof.[citation needed]

After the war, the camp served as a refugee center and transit point. In the 1950s, many people, especially ethnic Italians fleeing then communist Yugoslavia, passed through the camp, not to mention Croats and Russians, whose home was San Sabba, San Sabba Annex, Opicina, Gesuiti for more than three years before they were able to emigrate elsewhere.[citation needed]

See also

References

  1. ^ La Risiera di San Sabba. Le Deportazioni, La Liberazione. moked/מוקד il portale dell'ebraismo italiano.
  2. ^ The Museum (2009). "Risiera di San Sabba. History and Museum" (PDF). With selected bibliography. International Committee of the Nazi Lager of Risiera di San Sabba, Trieste: 1–7. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 7, 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2015.
  3. ^ The Museum (2009). "Risiera di San Sabba. History and Museum" (PDF). With selected bibliography. International Committee of the Nazi Lager of Risiera di San Sabba, Trieste: 1–7. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 7, 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 3 January 2020, at 05:32
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