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Richard Murphy (screenwriter)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Richard Murphy
Born(1912-05-08)May 8, 1912
DiedMay 19, 1993(1993-05-19) (aged 81)
Resting placeHoly Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California, U.S.
Occupation(s)Screenwriter
Film director
Film producer

Richard Murphy (May 8, 1912 – May 19, 1993) was an American screenwriter, film director and producer. His screenplays for Boomerang (1947) and The Desert Rats (1953) were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Screenplay, respectively.

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  • Andrew Lanham: Nicholl Fellowship Screenwriter

Transcription

My name is Andrew Lanham and I'm getting my Master's in Fine Arts in Screenwriting at the RTF Department. I finish in May. This is a two-year program and I'm in the second and final year. The screenplay is called 'The Jumper of Maine'. It's my second script. It's about a paramedic with Tourette's syndrome in Maine who falls in love with a single mother. I have Tourette's. It's a lot less now than it used to be but I grew up with it. So, I guess, that's kind of where the germ of the idea came from. [My screenplay] was one of the five winners for the fellowship. We win $30,000 over a year with that. And we are contacted by around 100 agents, managers and producers. Growing up, I was really obsessed with movies. I watched them over and over and over and watched pretty much everything. I thought I wanted to be an actor, because when I acted my Tourette's kind of disappeared. But that passion kind of faded away in college when I started writing. And I've been writing ever since! I thought they were both really strong programs from what I'd heard about them. They are really high-ranked, and they have a small amount of students. There are only 7 people, including myself, in the program. The seven of us, when we're in a workshop, or in any of our classes, we are all writing different things and have different perspectives and outlooks. In the first year in the program, I learned more than I ever could have hoped to learn -- and in kind of the perfect setting in which to learn it -- with really, really amazing teachers and people running the program. They've been mentoring me and helping me every step of the way, in terms of making the right decisions to bridge the gap into having a career. I've gotten the best of everything in the program here.

Biography

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Murphy worked for Literary Digest in the 1930s before leaving in 1937 to work in the short film department at MGM. Murphy's first screenwriting credit was for providing the story for Back in the Saddle, a 1941 Gene Autry western.

While in the Army Air Forces during World War II, Murphy reached the rank of captain seeing action in the Pacific theater countries of New Guinea and the Philippines. Murphy returned to the States and started working for 20th Century Fox. In 1947 he wrote the award-winning film Boomerang. He received the first of two Oscar nominations for this screenplay, with his second in 1953 for the World War II film The Desert Rats. He also directed a few films before moving into television in the 1960s when he wrote and created television series. Murphy's last screenplay was for The Kidnapping of the President in 1980.

Filmography

Writer

Director

Producer

  • The Mystery of the Chinese Junk (1967)

Awards and nominations

Year Result Award Category Film or series
1949 Nominated Writers Guild of America Award The Robert Meltzer Award (Screenplay Dealing Most Ably with Problems of the American Scene) Cry of the City
1951 Nominated The Robert Meltzer Award (Screenplay Dealing Most Ably with Problems of the American Scene) Panic in the Streets
Nominated Best Written American Drama Panic in the Streets
1952 Nominated Best Written American Comedy You're in the Navy Now
1960 Nominated Best Written American Drama Compulsion
1970 Won Valentine Davies Award
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1948 Nominated Academy Award Best Writing, Screenplay Boomerang!
1954 Nominated Best Writing, Story and Screenplay The Desert Rats

External links

This page was last edited on 22 May 2024, at 19:34
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