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Redcar (UK Parliament constituency)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Redcar is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Anna Turley, a Labour Co-operative candidate.[n 2]

History

The constituency was created in 1974 and held by the Labour Party, other than a period between 2010 and May 2015 when it was held by the Liberal Democrats.

Boundaries

1974-1983: The County Borough of Teesside wards of Coatham, Eston Grange, Kirkleatham, Ormesby, Redcar, and South Bank.

1983-1997: The Borough of Langbaurgh wards of Bankside, Church Lane, Coatham, Dormanstown, Eston, Grangetown, Kirkleatham, Newcomen, Normanby, Ormesby, Overfields, Redcar, South Bank, Teesville, and West Dyke.

1997-2010: The Borough of Langbaurgh-on-Tees wards of Coatham, Dormanstown, Eston, Grangetown, Kirkleatham, Longbeck, Newcomen, Normanby, Ormesby, Redcar, St Germain's, South Bank, Teesville, and West Dyke.

2010–present: The Borough of Redcar and Cleveland wards of Coatham, Dormanstown, Eston, Grangetown, Kirkleatham, Longbeck, Newcomen, Normanby, Ormesby, St Germain’s, South Bank, Teesville, West Dyke, and Zetland.

The Redcar constituency on the Cleveland coast is formed from parts of the Redcar and Cleveland district.

It takes its name from the coastal resort of Redcar although much of the population lives in the traditionally solid Labour areas between Redcar and Middlesbrough (such as Grangetown, Eston, Normanby, Ormesby and South Bank). It also includes Dormanstown, Kirkleatham and Marske-by-the-Sea. Once held by the former Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Mo Mowlam, the seat was gained by the Liberal Democrats in the 2010 general election on a massive 21.8% swing from Labour. In 2015, however, the sitting MP Ian Swales did not seek re-election, and Labour regained the seat on another huge swing of 18.9% away from the Liberal Democrats, who polled just ahead of UKIP with the Conservatives in fourth.

Constituency profile

The constituency had a slightly higher unemployment at the end of 2012 than the North-East average. However, it had a significantly lower claimant count, owing to its exports and manufacturing industry, than nearby Middlesbrough.[2] Average incomes based on the latest income (2001 census figures) available, not markedly lower than the national average.[3]

Members of Parliament

Election Member[4] Party
Feb 1974 James Tinn Labour
1987 Mo Mowlam
2001 Vera Baird
2010 Ian Swales Liberal Democrats
2015 Anna Turley Labour

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

General Election 2017: Redcar
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op Anna Turley 23,623 55.5 +11.6
Conservative Peter Gibson 14,138 33.2 +17.0
Liberal Democrat Josh Mason 2,849 6.7 -11.8
UKIP Chris Gallacher 1,950 4.6 -13.8
Majority 9,485 22.3 -3.1
Turnout 42,626 63.8 +0.7
Labour hold Swing -2.7
General Election 2015: Redcar[5][6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op Anna Turley 17,946 43.9 +11.1
Liberal Democrat Josh Mason 7,558 18.5 -26.7
UKIP Christopher Gallacher 7,516 18.4 +13.9
Conservative Jacob Young 6,630 16.2 +2.4
Green Peter Pinkney 880 2.2 +2.2
North East Party Philip Lockey 389 1.0 +1.0
Majority 10,388 25.4
Turnout 40,919 63.1 +0.6
Labour gain from Liberal Democrat Swing 18.9
General Election 2010: Redcar[5][7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Ian Swales 18,955 45.2 +25.0
Labour Vera Baird 13,741 32.7 -18.6
Conservative Steve Mastin 5,790 13.8 -4.1
UKIP Martin Bulmer 1,875 4.5 +3.0
BNP Kevin Broughton 1,475 3.5 +1.0
TUSC Hannah Walter 127 0.3 N/A
Majority 5,214 12.4
Turnout 41,963 62.5 +4.5
Liberal Democrat gain from Labour Swing 21.8

Elections in the 2000s

General Election 2005: Redcar[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Vera Baird 19,968 51.4 -8.9
Liberal Democrat Ian Swales 7,852 20.2 +7.6
Conservative Jonathan Lehrle 6,954 17.9 -7.2
Independent Christopher McGlade 2,379 6.1 N/A
BNP Andrew Harris 985 2.5 N/A
UKIP Edward Walker 564 1.5 N/A
Socialist Labour John Taylor 159 0.4 -1.6
Majority 12,116 31.2
Turnout 38,861 58.0 +1.7
Labour hold Swing -8.3
General Election 2001: Redcar[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Vera Baird 23,026 60.3 -7.1
Conservative Chris Main 9,583 25.1 +2.0
Liberal Democrat Stan Wilson 4,817 12.6 +3.1
Socialist Labour John Taylor 772 2.0 N/A
Majority 13,443 35.2
Turnout 38,198 56.3 -14.7
Labour hold Swing -4.6

Elections in the 1990s

General Election 1997: Redcar[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Mo Mowlam 32,972 67.30 +11.3
Conservative Andrew Isaacs 11,308 23.10 -9.0
Liberal Democrat Joyce Benbow 4,679 9.6 -2.3
Majority 21,664 44.2
Turnout 44,280
Labour hold Swing +10.2
General Election 1992: Redcar[12][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Mo Mowlam 27,184 56.0 +8.6
Conservative Robert Goodwill 15,607 32.1 +0.8
Liberal Democrat Chris Abbott 5,789 11.9 −9.4
Majority 11,577 23.8 +7.8
Turnout 48,580 77.7 +1.7
Labour hold Swing +3.9

Elections in the 1980s

General Election 1987: Redcar[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Mo Mowlam 22,824 47.34
Conservative Peter Bassett 15,089 31.30
Social Democratic Glyn Nightingale 10,298 21.36
Majority 7,735 16.04
Turnout 76.05
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1983: Redcar[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Tinn 18,348 40.59
Conservative Peter Bassett 15,244 33.72
Social Democratic Glyn Nightingale 11,614 25.69
Majority 3,104 6.87
Turnout 71.25
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

General Election 1979: Teesside, Redcar
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Tinn 25,470 53.68
Conservative E. Cottrell 17,417 36.71
Liberal A. Elliott 4,225 8.91
Independent E. Lloyd 333 0.70
Majority 8,053 16.97
Turnout 75.90
Labour hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Teesside, Redcar
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Tinn 23,204 53.86
Conservative R. Hall 12,774 29.65
Liberal N. Clark 7,101 16.48
Majority 10,430 24.21
Turnout 69.08
Labour hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Teesside, Redcar
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Tinn 28,252 59.79
Conservative R. Hall 18,998 40.21
Majority 9,254 19.59
Turnout 76.66
Labour win (new seat)

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "England Parliamentary electorates 2010-2018". Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  3. ^ 2001 Census
  4. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "R" (part 1)
  5. ^ a b "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Redcar". BBC News. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  7. ^ "UK > England > North East > Redcar". Election 2010. BBC. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 10 May 2010.
  8. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  9. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  10. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  11. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20000418103332/http://www.bbc.co.uk/election97/live/index.htm
  12. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06.
  14. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
This page was last edited on 23 March 2019, at 22:57
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