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Raytheon T-1 Jayhawk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

T-1 Jayhawk / T-400
T-1A Jayhawk.jpg
Role Trainer aircraft
Manufacturer Raytheon
Hawker Beechcraft
First flight 5 July 1991[1]
Introduction 17 January 1992
Status Active service
Primary users United States Air Force
Japan Air Self-Defense Force
Produced 1992–1997
Number built 180
Developed from Beechjet/Hawker 400A

The Raytheon T-1 Jayhawk is a twin-engined jet aircraft used by the United States Air Force for advanced pilot training. T-1A students go on to fly airlift and tanker aircraft. The T-400 is a similar version for the Japan Air Self-Defense Force.

Design and development

The T-1A Jayhawk is a medium-range, twin-engine jet trainer used in the advanced phase of Air Force Joint Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training for students selected to fly strategic/tactical airlift or tanker aircraft. It is used also for training Air Force Combat Systems Officers in high and low level flight procedures during the advanced phase of training. It also augmented or served in lieu of the T-39 Sabreliner in the Intermediate phase of US Navy/Marine Corps Student Naval Flight Officer training until the joint Air Force-Navy/Marine Corps training pipeline split in 2010 and now remains solely in operation with the U.S. Air Force, leaving the Navy with the Sabreliner pending its eventual replacement. The T-1 Jayhawk shares the same letter and number as the long retired T-1 SeaStar under the 1962 United States Tri-Service aircraft designation system.

The swept-wing T-1A is a military version of the Beechjet/Hawker 400A. It has cockpit seating for an instructor and two students and is powered by twin turbofan engines capable of an operating speed of Mach .78. The T-1A differs from its commercial counterpart with structural enhancements that provide for a large number of landings per flight hour, increased bird strike resistance and an additional fuselage fuel tank. A total of 180 T-1 trainers were delivered between 1992–1997.

The first T-1A was delivered to Reese Air Force Base, Texas, in January 1992, and student training began in 1993.

Another military variant is the Japan Air Self-Defense Force T-400 (400T) trainer, which shares the same type certificate as the T-1A.[2]

Variants

A T-1A parked at Centennial Airport (2008)
A T-1A parked at Centennial Airport (2008)
T-1A
United States military designation for trainer powered by two JT15D-5B turbofans, 180 built.[3]
T-400
Japanese military designation for the Model 400T powered by two JT15D-5F turbofans, also known by the project name TX; 13 built.[citation needed]

Operators

JASDF T-400 at Iruma Air Base (2005)
JASDF T-400 at Iruma Air Base (2005)
 Japan
 United States

Specifications (T-1A)

T-1A Cockpit
T-1A Cockpit

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1993–94[4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot/instructor, observer)
  • Capacity: 4 passengers
  • Length: 48 ft 5 in (14.76 m)
  • Wingspan: 43 ft 6 in (13.26 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 11 in (4.24 m)
  • Wing area: 241.4 sq ft (22.43 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 7.5:1
  • Airfoil: Mitsubishi MAC510
  • Empty weight: 10,450 lb (4,740 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 16,100 lb (7,303 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney Canada JT15D-5B turbofan, 2,900 lbf (13 kN) thrust each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 468 kn (539 mph, 867 km/h) at 27,000 ft (8,200 m)
  • Cruise speed: 392 kn (451 mph, 726 km/h) long range cruise at 41,000 ft (12,000 m)
  • Stall speed: 93 kn (107 mph, 172 km/h) CAS
  • Range: 2,900 nmi (3,300 mi, 5,400 km) [5]
  • Service ceiling: 41,000 ft (12,000 m)

See also

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

Related lists

References

  1. ^ William Green, Claudio Müller: Flugzeuge der Welt, 1992/93. Werner Classen Verlag, Zürich 1992, ISBN 3 7172 0368 1, p. 38.
  2. ^ TC Data Sheet A16SW
  3. ^ Jackson 2003, p. 537.
  4. ^ Lambert 1993, pp. 432-433.
  5. ^ "T-1A Jayhawk". U.S. Air Force. Retrieved 29 September 2015.

This article contains information that originally came from a US Government website, in the public domain. USAF Website

Bibliography

  • Jackson, Paul, ed. (2003). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 2003–2004. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-2537-5.
  • Lambert, Mark, ed. (1993). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1993–94. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Data Division. ISBN 0-7106-1066-1.

Further reading


External links

This page was last edited on 17 January 2021, at 10:57
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