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Randall L. Gibson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Randall L. Gibson
Randall L. Gibson - Brady-Handy.jpg
United States Senator
from Louisiana
In office
March 4, 1883 – December 15, 1892
Preceded byWilliam P. Kellogg
Succeeded byDonelson Caffery
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana's 1st district
In office
March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1883
Preceded byEffingham Lawrence
Succeeded byCarleton Hunt
Personal details
Born(1832-09-10)September 10, 1832
Versailles, Kentucky
DiedDecember 15, 1892(1892-12-15) (aged 60)
Hot Springs, Arkansas
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materYale University
Military service
AllegianceConfederate States of America
Branch/serviceConfederate States Army
Years of service1861–1865
RankBrigadier General
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War

Randall Lee Gibson (September 10, 1832 – December 15, 1892) was an attorney and politician, elected as a member of the House of Representatives and U.S. Senator from Louisiana. He served as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. Later he was a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and a president of the board of administrators of Tulane University.

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  • ✪ Doctoral Ceremony Fall 2018
  • ✪ Spring 2018 Commencement, Doctoral Ceremony
  • ✪ 2018 Spring Commencement
  • ✪ Columbia Southern University 2018 Commencement
  • ✪ Fall 2013 Commencement - Afternoon Ceremony

Transcription

- [Announcer] Distinguished guests, please welcome your Fall 2018 Georgia Tech graduates. ("Pomp and Circumstance") (melodic instrumental music) (processional chamber music) (orchestral processional music) - Well good morning, and welcome. Will you please rise and remain standing for the singing of the national anthem, which will be sung by Nothin' But Treble. ♪ Oh say can you see ♪ ♪ By the dawn's early light ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hailed ♪ ♪ At the twilight's last gleaming ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ Through the perilous fight ♪ ♪ O'er the ramparts we watched ♪ ♪ Were so gallantly streaming ♪ ♪ And the rockets red glare ♪ ♪ The bombs bursting in air ♪ ♪ Gave proof through the night ♪ ♪ That our flag was still there ♪ ♪ Oh say does that star spangled ♪ ♪ Banner yet wave ♪ ♪ O'er the land of the free ♪ ♪ And the home ♪ ♪ Of the ♪ ♪ Brave ♪ (audience applauding) - Please be seated. In addition to our students preparing for military service, I'd like for us to take a moment to recognize all of the veterans and active service members that are here with us this morning. If you have served or are currently serving in any branch of the U.S. military, please rise and let us show our appreciation. (audience applauding) At this time I am pleased to introduce Dr. Ruilong Ma, a doctoral candidate, who will give our reflection. Dr. Ma? - Thank you, President Peterson. Good morning friends, family, academic family, and of course, fellow graduates. Georgia Tech is a magnet that attracts bright students from so many different backgrounds. Even before we, the graduate students, the research and teaching assistants, first stepped foot on campus, we brought with us a host of academic accolades, and a wealth of talent from across different backgrounds. Looking back on our time here, what did the Georgia Tech PhD experience mean for us? Well to start, how 'bout the Georgia Tech PhD bringing us a healthy dose of humility. Here at Tech, we learn that quick. I don't know that many people who went through that Tech first year graduate course load and thought, boy, that was easy. On top of rigorous classes, remember your qualifying exam, proposal defense, or how 'bout your non-Tech friends asking how much longer it'll be before you graduate? I can sense sweaty palms and nervous glances abound even now. Tech sure did a good job at packaging humility into a lesson. Hope. It's the second thing we couldn't have made it through here without learning. Sure as Tech grads, we've got, we've made important contributions across our fields of study. We've got exciting careers to look forward to across industries and academia, in national labs, all over the world. All this builds hope. But then there are the little things as well. For instance there are not many institutions where on a cold winter's day we could look outside the window, see half an inch of snow dusting, and still hope for a no school day. (audience laughing) Another great source of hope is this third but most important thing we got at Tech, our community. I've always known I could count on my mom, dad, and my little brother to support me in my PhD. But today, each one of us can count on the myriad connections we have formed with other members of the Tech community. From among our peers sitting here in our graduating year, to our colleagues in our home departments, to the institute faculty and staff who work hard to create a safe and supportive environment for us to learn in every single day. The connections that we formed at Tech, many, many of them will persist even as we move beyond here. Some may even become the most important connections we form in our lives. Humility, hope, and community. These are what the Georgia Tech experience has brought for each one of us. It's how we're made different from the person who first stepped foot on campus, to the person who's proud to be a Ramblin' Wreck of Georgia Tech today. Georgia Tech's PhD Class of 2018, congratulations on your accomplishments. And may you carry all the lessons from your time here to your future endeavors. (audience applauding) - Thank you Dr. Ma, and good luck as you move forward in your career. (audience applauding) Graduates, members of the faculty and staff, distinguished guests, families and friends, it's my great pleasure to welcome you all to the 256th Commencement Exercises here at the Georgia Institute of Technology. (audience applauding) This weekend's activities recognize our fall graduates, and this morning we celebrate 310 doctoral degree recipients. This afternoon we'll honor 1,840 masters degree recipients, and tomorrow morning we'll recognize 1,470 undergraduate. As we celebrate the successful conclusion of one chapter of your lifelong education, it's important to acknowledge that you have not done it alone. With us today are many families, friends, and colleagues, whose love and support have helped to make this day possible for each of you. In addition, with us are members of the faculty who've guided and mentored you as students, sharing with you their time, their wisdom, and their expertise, in order that this event could occur and that each and every one of you will reach your fullest potential, and achieve this important milestone. Would the members of the faculty please stand and be recognized. (audience applauding) Thank you for being with us this morning. At this time I'd like to recognize several members of the stage party, and I ask that you hold your applause as they stand when I call their names, and wait until I finish introducing all of them to recognize them. First, Dr. Seth Marder, Georgia Tech's 2018 Distinguished Professor, and today's mace bearer. (audience applauding) Dr. Archie Ervin, Vice President for Institute Diversity. Mr. John Stein, Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students. Dr. Charles Isbell, Executive Associate Dean in College of Computing. Dr. Carol Colatrella, Associate Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. Dr. Steven French, Dean the College of Design. Dr. Peter Thompson, Senior Associate Dean in the Ernest Scheller, Jr. College of Business. Dr. David Collard, Interim Dean, College of Sciences. Dr. Rob Butera, Associate Dean, College of Engineering. Ms. Isabella Marques de Castilla, Senior Associate Dean and Chief Operating Officer of the Library. Dr. Jennifer Herazy, Associate Provost for Operations and Chief of Staff. Dr. Leslie Sharp, Associate Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Faculty Development. And Mr. Jeremy Gray, Senior Associate Registrar. Let's recognize them. (audience applauding) This is a momentous day, for you as graduates, and for your family and friends, who are here with you to share in the celebration of your many accomplishments. You've worked very hard to earn your degree from one of the best institutions in the nation, and in some fields, one of the best in the world. Georgia Tech faculty are engaged in research collaborations in more than 100 countries. The Institute has global centers in Costa Rica, Panama, and Singapore, and a joint campus that we've recently established in Shenzhen, China. And for nearly 30 years Georgia Tech has had a campus in Lorraine, France. In that time more than 7,800 students have spent a semester or more at Georgia Tech Lorraine. Many of you have partnered in research. Research that has the potential to change our world. And here at Georgia Tech we pride ourselves on being trailblazers. Individuals who drive real world change by embracing challenges, thinking critically, and developing innovative solutions to some of the most pressing problems facing our world today. Your Georgia Tech education is designed to help you work collaboratively, to identify challenges, and to create solutions. And to be leaders in business, industry, government, and the communities in which you live and work. Georgia Tech is in the business of creating the next. The next idea, the next technology, the next innovators, and the next entrepreneurs. We are empowering the next generation of scientists, engineers, business men and women, architects, and so many others. Engendering in each of them the passion and skills that they will need to help design our future. You will be forever linked to this great institution and we're looking from great things from each and every one of you. (audience applauding) Today we're honored to have as our commencement speaker Dr. Seth Marder, Regents Professor and Georgia Power Chair of Energy Efficiency in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the School of Material Science and Engineering. This past spring Dr. Marder received Georgia Tech's highest honor given to a faculty member, the Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award. The award recognizes the outstanding achievement in teaching, research, and service. It was instituted at the 50th anniversary of the graduation of the class of 1934. In observance of its 50th year reunion. Each year the award is presented to a professor who has made significant long term contributions that have brought widespread recognition to the individual, to his or her school, and to the institute. Dr. Marder grew up in Brooklyn, New York. After earning a bachelor's degree from MIT and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and completing post-doctoral studies at Oxford University and Caltech, he worked at Caltech, at the Jet Propulsion Lab. He was a professor at the University of Arizona for five years before joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 2003. And when he came to Tech, he came as part of a team, with three other faculty members who had expertise in his and related fields. His research pertains to organic materials, essentially plastic-like materials for photonics and electronics. Organic materials for photonics has applications in areas such as 3D microfabrication, and very high speed data processing and communication. Over the years Dr. Marder has mentored more than 150 graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and research scientists as part of his group. Many of those individuals are now leaders in industry and academia around the world. He also mentors other staff members and faculty. In addition to his sterling record of teaching and research Dr. Marder is known across campus for his tireless service work. He's often called upon to serve on committees and task forces, and because of his reputation, he offers a fresh approach and the ability to cut to the heart of the problem. I'm pleased to call Dr. Marder a colleague. Please welcome him as he presents the commencement address. (audience applauding) - President Peterson, Georgia Tech faculty, students, family and friends, it's an honor and a privilege to stand before you today at today's PhD commencement ceremony. As Bud said, I was invited to speak in my capacity as the Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor. I am humbled and extremely grateful to have received this award as it considers all aspects of a professor's job, not just research or teaching or service. I will note that despite the fact that some of my colleagues insist otherwise, I wasn't actually from the class of 1934. I missed that by at least a few years. So first, let me congratulate each of you as well as your families on this momentous occasion. Now, as each of you has reached this milestone in your academic and professional career, I'd suggest that it could be beneficial for you to take a moment and reflect upon what lessons, beyond the technical details of your dissertation topic, you have learned during your years working towards your PhD, that in 20 to 30 years you will still consider important. In that regard, behind me you see the Georgia Tech emblem that features two themes, progress and service. In working with great focus on experiments, papers, in some cases patents, as well as the thesis itself, it's easy not to fully appreciate other aspects of our experience that enable us to work on both progress and service. Clearly within the word progress, the concept of service can be implicitly incorporated into the meaning. However progress transcends scientific and technological advances, but embraces how advances are made and can be implemented in a manner that benefits the greater good. Of course, the word service also has a role that's not necessarily linked to our technological progress but rather solely to the fact that we are members of society who can contribute thought, time, and effort, to improving the state of the world in the broadest sense. We have a chance to help others and sometimes it's even more satisfying when we do so and no one even knows about it. To quote Indira Gandhi, India's first prime minster, there are two kinds of people, those who do the work, and those who take the credit. Try to be in the first group, there's less competition there. While it may seem early in your professional life to be considering your legacy, I will nonetheless make the suggestion that you do so. And as you do, keeping progress and service in mind is likely going to be beneficial. In addition I want you to consider the things about which you are passionate and that bring you satisfaction and joy. To be honest I don't think I truly appreciated the difference between satisfaction and joy until I brought home my yellow Labrador puppy and learned just how good I felt being with him. I was in my late 30s at the time, but it was truly a life-changing moment. I recognized how important it is that our need for passion, satisfaction, and joy, is nurtured in order to maintain the balance, the energy, and the focus that will keep us both motivated and fulfilled in the long run. It was a lesson that I wish I had learned quite a bit earlier, but I'm certainly grateful to have learned it. And now I consciously try to incorporate and recognize those things that bring me joy and satisfaction into my daily activities. I came to realize that teaching and service are actually things that I am not only passionate about, but that also bring me great joy. What are these things for you? I can't begin to know, but I can tell you that investing some time to consider it is likely a great investment. As you consider this, I want to share two of my favorite quotes, that more than anything capture my worldview in a nutshell. First, only those who dare greatly can ever achieve greatly. This was spoken by Robert F. Kennedy in an address at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, in 1966. A related quote has often been attributed to Robert Kennedy, I gather because he was so fond it, but it's actually from the British playwright George Bernard Shaw. He said, you see things, you say why. But I dream things that never were and I say why not. My version is more like, if it doesn't violate the laws of thermodynamics, it's possible. I have accomplished things others said I would never be able to do simply because rather than debating whether they could be done, I invested my time and energy in thinking about how I would get them done. This has been extremely empowering and I encourage you to do the same. In everything that we do, we must evaluate risk and benefit. Often people don't even try to do things because they fear they may not succeed. However, if you want to change the world, you need to dream big, forge ahead, realizing that some things will succeed, and others might not. While I have some measure of success in my career, I consider myself insecure and a person plagued with many doubts. However, my biggest fear is looking back with regret that I had the opportunity to do something really important and walked away. Even now if you look at a person's CV, you'll see that in general, it collects successes, such as papers, talks, awards and the like, and the failures tend not to accumulate unless they're monumental. Failures are only truly failures if we don't take lessons away from them. So we live in a world where so much needs doing, and we could simply say that it's just too hard, and you can fill in whatever the it means for you. Or I will just go along to get along. But the world needs people, folks like yourselves, who will stand up and shake things up. To again quote George Bernard Shaw, who said in his play Man and Superman, the reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. So sometimes we need to buck the system, and have the courage to stand up for what we believe and what is right. This is particularly true at a time when even the notion of facts is called into question, and the large disparities that still exist in the quality of life are there based on race, gender, place of birth, and so on. So now it's the time, and you are the people who can make the world better. And the world really needs you. Let me end with a very personal story. I was an MIT undergraduate, and in the summer of my freshman year I started working with an amazing professor. Rafael, you may have known him. His name was Alan Davison. He literally taught me how to do chemistry, firsthand, in the lab, and helped me in ways I could not begin to enumerate. When students had problems with their research, or their life, they would go and chat with Alan because he cared, he listened, and he helped. Apart from this, Alan was an amazing chemist who co-invented a Technetium compound called Cardiolite for imaging the heart and saved many lives, and was for many years, and may still be, MIT's largest grossing patent. Shortly before I graduate, Alan took me to the Muddy Charles Pub on the MIT campus to have a beer and a chat. At that time I said to Alan that I couldn't begin to thank him for all that he had done for me. And he said to me, and of course I'm paraphrasing, with his Welsh accent, he said well, lad, let me tell you my story. He related that during elementary school he was a troublemaker and was held back multiple times. And when he finally got to the equivalent of high school, the headmaster, or principal said to him, "Davison, you'll never make anything of yourself, "you should get a job in a factory." And so he did. He met an older worker who had a different opinion of him. He saw something special in Alan and he advised him that he should go to night school. Alan enrolled and his coworker covered for him during the day shift as Alan worked on problem sets. Alan graduated from college, was accepted at Imperial College in London, where he did his PhD with the late Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson, who shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. And the rest is history. Before Alan left Wales to head off to Imperial, he spoke with the older man. He thanked him and asked him what he could ever do to repay him. The old man said, "Davison, someday you'll have the chance "to do for someone else what I did for you." Alan embraced and actually personified that ideal. Alan told me that story in May of 1981, and I'll take it to my grave. I am as moved telling you it today as I was hearing it over 36 years ago. Many have invested in you and now you have the opportunity to pay it forward in the Georgia Tech tradition of progress and service. This is your opportunity, your time. I wish you all the best. Congratulations to the Class of 2018, and to all the Georgia Tech PhD graduates. Thank you. (audience applauding) - [President Peterson] I've got a gift for you. - [Professor Marder] Okay. - Thank you Professor Marder, we appreciate all you do for Georgia Tech. - Thank you. (audience applauding) - We now come to the time you've all been waiting for, the conferring of your degrees. The moment of walking across the stage represents the culmination of much work and achievement for each of our graduates. As we call the name of each doctoral candidate and advisor I ask that the advisor and then the student process onto the stage. Our hooding assistant, Executive Associate Dean Charles Isbell, will be there to greet you and to assist your advisor with the hooding process. After you've received your hood, Provost Bras will congratulate you with a handshake and present you with your diploma. I ask that you then return to your seat and show your fellow students the same respect that they have given to you as you cross the stage. At this time, I am pleased to welcome to the podium Executive Vice President and Provost Dr. Rafael Bras to present the candidates for the degree. - Good morning everybody. You ready? First of all congratulations to all, and I want to take a minute to, hopefully you'll remember Professor Marder's words. Remember the progress and service. Dream big. Do it with enjoyment. And never give up. A great message. (audience applauding) Will the candidates for the doctoral degrees please rise. (audience applauding) Mr. President, I have the honor of presenting to you the candidates for doctoral degrees who have completed all requirements for those degrees. - Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology, and by the authority of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, I confer upon each of you the degree of doctor of philosophy with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities thereunto appertaining. Congratulations on earning Georgia Tech's highest degree. (audience applauding) - [Announcer] Doctor of Philosophy. Dr. Bo Dai. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Le Song. (light instrumental music) Dr. Jiajia Li. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Richard Wilson Vuduc. Dr. Emily Rogers. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Christine Heitsch. Dr. Piyush Kumar Sao. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Richard Wilson Vuduc. Dr. Fang Zhou. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Vladimir Koltchinskii. Dr. Nicholas Attila Kovacs. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Loren D. Williams. Dr. Shengyun Peng. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Joshua S. Weitz. - It's good, okay, now I hear it. - [Man] There you go. - [Announcer] Dr. Bao Zhang. The doctoral advisor is Gregory C. Gibson. - [Announcer] Dr. Daniel Akashi Porto. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Hang Lu. Dr. Yoshitaka John Sei. The doctoral advisor is Dr. YongTae Kim. Dr. Scott B. Thorsen The doctoral advisors are Dr. Christine Payne and Dr. Craig Richard Forest. - Dr. Jason Lee Wang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Robert E. Guldberg. Dr. Elizabeth Anne Campbell. The doctoral advisor is Todd Aaron Sulchek. - [Announcer] Dr. Diego Sayed Dumani Jarquin. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Stanislav Emelianov. Dr. Joan Fernandez Esmerats. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Hanjoong Jo. Dr. Akia Nichelle Parks. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Manu O. Platt. Dr. In-chel Sen. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Stanislav Emelianov. Dr. Janani Venugopalan. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dongmei-Wang. Dr. Riley Thomas Zeller-Townson. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Robert John Butera. Dr. Sarah Cannon. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dana Randall. - Dr. Kayla Surry DesPortes. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Betsy DiSalvo. - [Woman] Yeah Kayla! - [Woman] Kayla! - Dr. Alex Godwin. And the doctoral advisor is John T. Stasko. - [Announcer] Dr. Charles Clinton Zeagler. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Melody Marie Moore. Dr. Jiang Dong. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Frank Dellaert. Dr. Karim Ahmed Ahmed Ibrahim Habak. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Ellen Zegura and Dr. Mostafa Ammar. (cheers and applause) - [Announcer] Dr. Jonathan Beck-Well. And the doctoral advisor is Elizabeth Mynatt. - [Announcer] Dr. Jing Deng. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Frank Dellaert. Dr. Brian Paul Hrolenok. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Tucker Richard Balch. Dr. Ahmad Humayun. The doctoral advisor is Dr. James Matthew Rehg. (muffled shouting) Dr. Ching-Kai Liang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Milos Prvulovic. Dr. Jongsea Park. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Hadi Esmaeilzadeh. Dr. Sunjae Young Park. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Milos Prvulovic. Dr. Umashanthi Pavalanathan. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Jacob R. Eisenstein. Dr. Kaeser M. Sabrin. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Constantinos Dovrolis. Dr. Payam Siyari. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Constantinos Dovrolis. Dr. Natesh Srinivasan. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Frank Dellaert. Dr. Shanmukha Ramakrishna Vedantam. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Devi Ann Parikh. Dr. Brian Joseph Wiltkin. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Ashok K. Goel. Dr. Peng Zhang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Richard Peng. Dr. Jean Ho Chu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Ali Mazalek. Dr. Thomas Nelson Jenkins. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Carl DiSalvo. Dr. Jenna Kathleen Corwin McGrath. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Valerie Thomas. Dr. Minsoo Baek. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Baabak Ashuri. Dr. Jessica Lynn Harbour Doyle. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Catherine L. Ross. - Dr. Yongsung Lee. Dr. Yongsung Lee. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Subro Guhathakurta. - [Man] Makes it easier. - [Announcer] Dr. Karthik Babu Nattamai Kannan. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Sridhar Narasimhan and Dr. Yu Hu. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. - Dr. Dee Yang. And the doctoral advisor is Xi Kuang. Dr. Xin Cao. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Carol Paty. - [President Peterson] Congratulation. - [Announcer] Dr. Eryn Melissa Eitel. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Martial Taillefert. Dr. Longlei Li. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Irina Sokolik. - Dr. Lucas Rampino Liuzzo. And the doctoral advisor is Sven Simon. Dr. Sathya Balachander. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Francesca Storici. - [Announcer] Dr. Josh Parris. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Frank James Stewart. Dr. Chinar Kashinath Patil. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Jeffrey Todd Streelman. - [Woman] Woohoo! Yeah! - [Announcer] Dr. Angela Viviana Pena Gonzalez. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Konstantinos T. Konstantinidis. Dr. Yusuf Mohammed Uddin. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Ingeborg Schmidt-Krey. Dr. Tongzhou Chen. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Martin Short. - [President Peterson] Congratulations and good luck. Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Ashley Marie Lawrence-Huizenga. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Rick Thomas. Dr. Jessie D. Martin. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Randall W. Engel. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Chen Xu. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Christian Houdre and Dr. Robert D. Foley. Dr. Benedikt Bruno Brandt. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Uzi Landman. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holidays. - [Announcer] Dr. Douglas William Beau Broadwater, Jr. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Harold Kim. - [President Peterson] Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Bharath Hebbe Madhusudhana. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Michael S. Chapman. Dr. Yanyan Ji. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Flavio H. Fenton. Dr. Gable Marsh Wadsworth. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Harold Kim. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Thanks for being here. You have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Shangguo Zhu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Shina Tan. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. - [Announcer] Dr. Taylor Gray Allen. The doctoral advisors are Joseph W. Perry and Dr. Seth Marder. Dr. Jennifer Marie Beveridge. The doctoral advisor is Dr. M.G. Finn. Dr. Udita Brahmachari. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Bridgette Barry. Dr. Yu Cao. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Joseph P. Sadighi. Dr. Helen Wei Ya Chen. The doctoral advisor is Dr. John Z. Zhang. Dr. Vanessa Elisa Cox. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Eric Alexander Gaucher, and Dr. Loren D. Williams. Dr. Chu Han. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David S. Sholl. Dr. Lucas Robert Johnstone. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Joseph W. Perry and Dr. Carlos Silva. Dr. Hye Kyung Kim. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Seth Marder. Dr. Chinmay Ravinora Kulkarni The doctoral advisor is Dr. David M. Collard. Dr. John Philip Tillotson. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Joseph W. Perry. Dr. George William Ward. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Stefan A. France. - [Announcer] Dr. Corey Williams. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Stefan A. France. - [Announcer] Dr. Enbo Zhao. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Gleb Yushin. - [President Peterson] Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Wenjia Wang. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Benjamin Haaland, Dr. Chien-Fu Jeff Wu and Dr. Rui Tuo. Dr. Xin Wei. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Eva K. Lee. Dr. Chandana Kolluru. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Mark R. Prausnitz. Dr. Yohan Park. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Joseph W. Perry. - [President Peterson] You have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Alicia Marie Glyn Rossi. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Surya Kalidindi. Dr. Ankit Kumar Singh. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Samuel Graham. Dr. Aaron Ellis Tallman. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David L. McDowell. Dr. Young Jin Yoon. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Zhiqun Lin. Dr. Xu-jin Sang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Paul Stephen Russo. Dr. Samaneh Ebrahimi. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Kamran Paynabar. - Dr. Can Zhang. The doctoral advisors are Turgay Ayer and Dr. Chelsea White. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Man] You too. - Dr. Burak Bagdatli. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios Mavris. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. Thanks, good to see you too. - [Announcer] Dr. Kaivalya Sanjeev Bakshi. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Evangelos Theodorou. Dr. Gokcin Cinar. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios N. Mavris. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Raphael Patrick Cohen. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Eric M. Feron. - [Announcer] Dr. Debolina Dasgupta. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. Timothy Charles Lieuwen. (cheerful whooping) - [Announcer] Dr. Evan David Harrison. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios N. Mavris. - [President Peterson] For being here, Charles. - [Announcer] Dr. Qu-man Li. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Eric Norman Johnson. Dr. Mario Adam Lee. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios N. Mavris. - [Man] Whoo! Go Mario! - [Announcer] Dr. Alexandra Cheryl Long. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David Allan Spencer. Dr. Shane Vincent Lympany. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Krishan K. Ahuja. Dr. Song Yu Min. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios N. Mavris. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Murali Gopal Muraleedharan. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Vigor Yang. Dr. Takuma Nakamura. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Eric Norman Johnson. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck to you. - [Announcer] Dr. Leah Josephine Ruckle. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Dimitrios N. Mavris. (cheering and applause) Dr. Terry Hurley Stevenson. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Glenn Lightsey. - [President Peterson] Good luck to you. Thank you, thanks for coming, you have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Souryadeep Bhattacharyya. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Sankar Nair. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Good to see you. - [Announcer] Dr. Rui Chang. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Mohan Srinivasarao and Dr. Elsa Reichmanis. Dr. Weize Hu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Michael Aaron Filler. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Benjamin Cole Hudson. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Anant Paravastu. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. - [Announcer] Dr. Emily Louise Jackson-Holmes. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Hang Lu. Dr. Jun Hyuk Kim. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Thomas Fuller. Dr. Yeon Hye Kwon. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Sankar Nair. Dr. Yang Liu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David S. Sholl. Dr. Songcheng Wang. The doctoral advisors are Dr. James Carson Meredith, III and Dr. Sven Behrens. Dr. Chunjae Yoo. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Christopher W. Jones. - [President Peterson] You have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Guanghui Zhu. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Christopher W. Jones and Dr. Ryan Lively. Dr. Josephine Taylor Bates. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Armistead Good Russell. Dr. Xiaoyang Meng. The doctoral advisor is Dr. John Crittenden. - [Announcer] Dr. Xin Tong. The doctoral advisor is Yongsheng Chen. - [Announcer] Dr. Bopeng Zhang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Yongsheng Chen. Dr. Natalia Hoffman Cardelino. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Kimberly Erin Kurtis and Dr. Thomas Russell Gentry. Dr. Heng Chi. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Glaucio Paulino. - [Woman] Wasn't watching. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holiday, thanks. - [Announcer] Dr. Haobing Liu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Randall L. Guensler. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Ajinkya Mahadeo Lokhande. the doctoral advisor is Dr. Donald W. White. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. O-san To-wa-hee. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Donald W. White. Dr. Xiao Zha Zeng. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Glaucio Paulino. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Reza Abbaspour. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Muhannad Saad Bakir. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck to you. Thanks for being here. - [Announcer] Dr. Anvesha Amaravati. And the doctoral advisor is Arijit Raychowdhury. Dr. Mohammad Faisal Amir. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Saibal Mukhopdhyay. - [Announcer] Dr. Juan Pablo Caram Wigdorsky. The doctoral advisor is Dr. James Stevenson Kenney. Dr. Brandon Thell Carroll. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David V. Anderson. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Good luck. Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Gong Chen. The doctoral advisor is Dr. John Alexander Copeland, III. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. HwanJune Cho. The doctoral advisor is Dr. George Vachtsevanos. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck. Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Hyunwoo Cho. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Xiaoli Ma. Dr. Brian D'Angelo Hayes. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Yusun Chang. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck. - [Announcer] Dr. Eric Robert Hein. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Thomas Martin Conte. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Nak-sung Patrick Hune. The doctoral advisor is Erik I. Verriest. - [President Peterson] You too, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Jenny Eunice Jeong. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Peng Qui. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck to you. Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Bhavana Kashrashina. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Thanks for being here. - [Announcer] Dr. Le Liang. - [Announcer] Dr. Andrew Kenneth Massimino. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Mark Andrew Davenport. - [Announcer] Dr. Zhong Meng. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Biing-Hwang Juang. - [Announcer] Dr. Michael George Moore. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Mark Andrew Davenport. Dr. Sagarika Mukesh. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Pamela Bhatti. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. - [Announcer] Dr. Babafemi Olusalua Odelowo. And the doctoral advisor is Dr. David Anderson. - [Announcer] Dr. Nathan Verdan Parrish. The doctoral advisor is Dr. David V. Anderson. Dr. Karthik Rao. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Sudhakar Yalamanchili and Dr. Yorai Wardi. Dr. Thomas Eric Sarvey. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Muhannad Saad Bakir. (whooping cheers) Dr. Miguel Moises Serrano. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Patricio A. Vela. - [Announcer] Dr. Jin Wang. - [Announcer] Dr. Taimour Wehbe. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Vincent J. Mooney. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. You have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Brian Robert Weir. The doctoral advisor is Dr. John David Cressler. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. Thanks for being here. - [Woman] Go Brian. - [Man] Go Brian. - [Announcer] Dr. Michael Joseph Doumit Wishon. The doctoral advisors are Dr. David Citrin and Dr. Alexander Daniel Locquet. - [Man] Yeah. - [Announcer] Dr. Liyao Wu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Maryam Saeedifard. Dr. Kee-shin Yang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Linda Milor. Dr. Qichen Yang. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Maryam Saeedifard. Dr. Heechul Yoon. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Stanislav Emelianov. Dr. Aneeq Zia. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Irfan Essa. Dr. Muneeb Zia. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Muhannad Saad Bakir. Dr. Jason Paul Zutty. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Aaron D. Lanterman. Dr. Christopher James Adams. The doctoral advisor is Dr. William E. Singhose. - [President Peterson] Good luck. Thanks for being here, have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Kaikai Che. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Julien Meaud. - [President Peterson] Thanks for being here. Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Srinivas Kumar Gowranga Hanasoge. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Peter J. Hesketh. Dr. Anurag Goyal. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Srinivas Garimella. - [Announcer] Dr. Yuanchen Hu. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Yogendra Kumar Joshi. - [President Peterson] Have a good holiday. Oh you have more, okay. - [Announcer] Dr. Kyungjin Kim. The doctoral advisors are Dr. Olivier Pierron and Dr. Samuel Graham, Jr. Dr. Kamil Kocak. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Kenneth A. Cunefare. - Sam. - Sam. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, well done. - [Announcer] Dr. Arkadeep Kumar. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Shreyes N. Melkote. - [President Peterson] Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Xuetian Ma. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Hailong Chen. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. - [Announcer] Dr. Allison Jasmine Mahvi. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Srinivas Garimella. - [President Peterson] Have a good holiday. - [Announcer] Dr. Jonathan Warner. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Jonathan David Rogers. - [President Peterson] Congratulations, good luck. - [Announcer] Dr. Ke Xiao. The doctoral advisor is Dr. J. Rhett Mayor. Dr. Ruilong Ma. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Vladimir Tsukruk. - [President Peterson] Congratulations. - [Announcer] Dr. Byeongyong Lee. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Seung Woo Lee. Dr. Anh Vuong Tran. The doctoral advisor is Dr. Yan Wang. Dr. Rebecca Anne Watts Hull. The doctoral advisor is Dr. William D. Winders. (audience applauding and cheering) - Will all of the graduates please rise. (audience applauding and cheering) Congratulations. You're all to be commended as you've earned a doctoral degree from one of the world's most prestigious institutions. You as graduates are now joining an extraordinarily active and high achieving group of alumni. Our alumni association is enriched by your inclusion. And I for one am looking forward to receiving regular updates on your progress, your advancement in your careers, and your successes. The fellowship of Tech welcomes you and I congratulate all of you once again. At this time, I'd ask the members of Nothin' But Treble to come forward, who will lead us in the Alma Mater, followed immediately by the faculty recessional. - [Woman] One, two. ♪ Oh, sons of Tech, arise, behold ♪ ♪ The banner as it reigns supreme ♪ ♪ For from on high the White and Gold ♪ ♪ Waves in its triumphant gleam ♪ ♪ The spirit of the cheering throng ♪ ♪ Resounds with joy revealing ♪ ♪ A brotherhood in praise and song ♪ ♪ In memory of the days gone by ♪ ♪ Oh, Scion of the Southland ♪ ♪ In our hearts you shall forever fly ♪ (audience applauding) - The graduates and audience are requested to remain standing as the platform party recesses. Then I invite all of you to join us in the nation's best known fight song, the Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech. Afterwards I invite you to attend the President's Reception. As you exit the McCamish Pavilion the whistle will blow several times in your honor. Thank you for your attendance this morning. Have a wonderful day, and congratulations. (audience applauding) (rousing recessional music) ♪ I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech, ♪ ♪ And a hell of an engineer ♪ ♪ A helluva, helluva, helluva, helluva, hell of an engineer ♪ ♪ Like all the jolly good fellows, I drink my whiskey clear ♪ ♪ I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech ♪ ♪ And a hell of an engineer ♪ ♪ Oh I wish I had a daughter, sir ♪ ♪ I'd dress her in White and Gold ♪ ♪ And put her on the campus to cheer the brave and bold ♪ ♪ But if I had a son, sir, I'll tell you what he'd do ♪ ♪ He would yell, to hell with Georgia ♪ ♪ Like his daddy used to do ♪ ♪ Oh, I wish I had a barrel of rum and sugar ♪ ♪ Three thousand pounds ♪ ♪ A college bell to put it in ♪ ♪ And a clapper to stir it around ♪ ♪ I'd drink to all the good fellows ♪ ♪ Who come from far and near ♪ ♪ I'm a ramblin', gamblin', hell of an engineer, hey ♪ (audience whooping) - Congrats, go on. (whistle blowing) ("Ramblin' Wreck of Georgia Tech") - [Band] Go Jackets! Go Jackets! Go Jackets! Go Jackets, fight, win!

Contents

Early life

Gibson was born in 1832 at "Spring Hill", Versailles, Kentucky,[1] the son of Gibson, a planter and slaveholder. His mother was from a slaveholding family in Lexington, Kentucky.

His paternal great-grandfather was Gideon Gibson Jr., who was likely born in the colony of South Carolina in 1731. His great-great-grandfather, Gideon Gibson, was a free man of color who was married to a white woman, and had owned land and a few slaves in Virginia (likely where he was born) and North Carolina, before migrating with other settlers to South Carolina in the 1730s. The government was worried that he might provoke a slave revolt and the colonial governor had an interview with him. Learning about his life, the governor declared him a free man with all privileges, and granted him land.[2]

Gibson's father moved his family to Louisiana when Randall was a child, where the youth was educated in local academies. He went to college in the North, graduating from Yale University in 1853, where he was a member of the Scroll and Key society. He returned to Louisiana to study for his bachelor of laws (LL.B) from the University of Louisiana Law School, later Tulane University.[1]

Civil War

c. 1860
c. 1860

Soon after the Louisiana's secession from the Union, Gibson became an aide to Gov. Thomas O. Moore.[1] On May 8, 1861, he left the capital to join the 1st Louisiana Artillery as a captain.[1]

On August 13, 1861, he was commissioned as colonel of the 13th Louisiana Infantry.[1] Gibson fought at the Battle of Shiloh and subsequent actions. With the Army of the Mississippi, he took part in the 1862 Kentucky Campaign and the Battle of Chickamauga. After being promoted to brigadier general (special) on January 11, 1864, he fought in the Atlanta Campaign and the Franklin-Nashville Campaign; he next was assigned to the defense of Mobile, Alabama. He inspired his troops to hold Spanish Fort, which was under siege,[3] until the last moment, after which they escaped at night on April 8, 1865. Gibson was captured at Cuba Station, Alabama on May 8, 1865 and paroled at Meridian, Mississippi on May 14, 1865.[1] He was pardoned on September 25, 1866.[1]

Postbellum career

Gibson returned to Louisiana after the war, working to help the state recover. It had suffered much damage to levees along the Mississippi, which threatened the large-scale plantations for cotton and sugar. Planters struggled to deal with free labor after the war.

In 1874, Gibson was elected as a Democrat in the United States House of Representatives, being re-elected and serving from March 4, 1875, until March 3, 1883.[1] He promoted the creation of the United States House Committee on the Mississippi Levees on December 10, 1875, to investigate the state of Mississippi levees and gain federal support for their building and repair, issues he persuaded his fellows were in the national interest because of the importance of the Mississippi, its trade, and the region's agriculture. The committee's name was changed to the Levees and Improvements of the Mississippi River on November 7, 1877.[4]

In 1882, Gibson was elected by the Louisiana state legislature (as was the procedure at the time) as United States Senator, serving from March 4, 1883, until his death on December 15, 1892.[1]

According to historian Daniel L. Sharfstein in The Invisible Line: Three American Families and the Secret Journey From Black to White (2011), during these years a political opponent challenged Gibson's status as a white man, based on records. Gibson investigated but learned only that his ancestors were property owners, which was "enough to satisfy most of Gibson's contemporaries."[5]

"Such status," Sharfstein explains, "could not mean anything but whiteness. ... As much as racial purity mattered to white Southerners, they had to circle the wagons around Randall Gibson. If someone of his position could not be secure in his race, then no one was safe"."[5]

Sharfstein claims that Gibson's paternal line went back to freed African slaves in colonial Virginia.[5]

Randall Gibson died as a United States senator while in Hot Springs, Arkansas.[1] His body was returned to Kentucky, where he was buried at Lexington Cemetery in Lexington, Kentucky.[1]

In memoriam

Gibson Hall on the campus of Tulane University is named for Senator Gibson, who was instrumental after the war in helping fund and continue the public University of Louisiana as the private Tulane University of Louisiana.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher, Civil War High Commands. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN 978-0-8047-3641-1. p. 254.
  2. ^ Daniel J. Sharfstein, "Black or White?", Opinionator blog, New York Times, 14 May 2011; accessed 08 June 2018
  3. ^ "Fort McDermott: "The Men Dig, Dig, Dig"". Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  4. ^ Records of the Committee on the Mississippi Levees (1875-77), History and Jurisdiction, National Archives.
  5. ^ a b c RAYMOND ARSENAULT, "Shades of White", New York Times, 25 February 2014, accessed 29 January 2014

References

Further reading

  • Sharfstein, Daniel L. The Invisible Line: Three American Families and the Secret Journey From Black to White, New York: Penguin Press, 2011

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Effingham Lawrence
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana's 1st congressional district

1875–1883
Succeeded by
Carleton Hunt
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
William P. Kellogg
 U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Louisiana
1883–1892
Served alongside: Benjamin F. Jonas, James B. Eustis, Edward D. White
Succeeded by
Donelson Caffery
This page was last edited on 14 April 2019, at 11:42
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