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RPI Engineers men's ice hockey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

RPI Engineers
Current season
RPI Engineers athletic logo
UniversityRensselaer Polytechnic Institute
ConferenceECAC
Head coachDave Smith
3rd season, 16–50–7 (.267)
Captain(s)Tommy Grant
Brady Wiffen
Will Reilly
ArenaHouston Field House
Capacity: 4,800
Surface: 200' x 85'
LocationTroy, New York
ColorsCherry and White[1]
         
NCAA Tournament championships
1954, 1985
NCAA Tournament Frozen Four
1953, 1954, 1961, 1964, 1985
NCAA Tournament appearances
1953, 1954, 1961, 1964, 1984, 1985, 1994, 1995, 2011
Conference Tournament championships
1984, 1985, 1995
Conference regular season championships
1952, 1953, 1954, 1984, 1985
Current uniform
ECAC-Uniform-RPI.png
The RPI starting lineup before a November 2014 game against Michigan
The RPI starting lineup before a November 2014 game against Michigan

The RPI Engineers men's ice hockey team is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college ice hockey program that represents Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). The Engineers are a member of ECAC Hockey (ECACH). They play at the Houston Field House in Troy, New York.[2][3]

History

Men's ice hockey at RPI dates back to 1901 and is one of the oldest programs in the United States.[4] The team played as an independent NCAA Division I team from its inception in 1901 through 1938.[4] The team resumed after World War II for the 1949–50 season, and in the following season Rensselaer joined Clarkson, Colgate, Middlebury, St. Lawrence, and Williams to form the Tri-State League for the 1950–51 season.[4] The next three seasons, the 1952–1954 team won the Tri-State League season championships. RPI's first NCAA Tournament berth in 1953, coming in third, and the following season in 1954 the team won its first NCAA Men's Division I Ice Hockey Championship.[4] After a six-year drought the program again made the NCAA Tournament in 1961, finishing fourth.[4] The 1960–61 season would be the last season RPI competed in the Tri-State League, as RPI and fellow Tri-State League members Clarkson and St. Lawrence joined the new ECAC Hockey League.[5]

Depending on how the rules are interpreted, the RPI men's ice hockey team may have the longest winning streak on record for a Division I team; in the 1984–85 season it went undefeated for 30 games, but one game was against the University of Toronto, a non-NCAA team. Continuing into the 1985–86 season, RPI continued undefeated over 38 games, including two wins over Toronto.[6] Adam Oates and Daren Puppa, two players during that time, both went on to become stars in the NHL. Joe Juneau, who played from 1987 to 1991, also spent many years in the NHL. Graeme Townshend, who also played in the late 1980s, had a brief NHL career. He is the first person of Jamaican ancestry to play in the National Hockey League.

Traditions

The hockey team plays a significant role in the campus's culture, drawing thousands of fans each week to the Houston Field House during the season. The team's popularity even sparked the tradition of the hockey line, where students lined up for season tickets months in advance of the on-sale date. Today, the line generally begins a week or more before ticket sales.[7] Another tradition since 1978 has been the "Big Red Freakout!" game held close to the first weekend of February. Fans usually dress in the schools colors Red and White, and gifts such as tee-shirts are distributed en masse. From 1995 to 2009, RPI's Division III teams were known as the Red Hawks. However the hockey, football, cross-country, tennis, and track and field teams all chose to retain the longstanding Engineers name. The Red Hawks name was, at the time, very unpopular among the student body; a Red Hawk mascot was frequently taunted with thrown concessions and chants of "kill the chicken!" This was a major factor behind "Engineers" being restored for all teams in 2009.

The official hockey mascot, The Puckman–an anthropomorphic hockey puck with an engineer's helmet–has always been popular.

Season

The RPI Engineers men's ice hockey typically plays between 35 and 42 regular season games per season in the ECAC Hockey Conference. They also usually play one exhibition game against a Canadian college hockey team from Ontario, Nova Scotia, or Quebec. During the season, RPI will play 22 conference games against the other 11 teams in the ECAC. RPI will play each team home game at the Houston Field House and each away game at the respective university's campus. The conference games are typically played on Friday and Saturday nights, with the ECAC scheduling reflecting the Ivy League scheduling of having traveling partners. RPI's travel partner has been Union College since they joined the league in the 1991-92 season. They also play 10-12 non-conference games against teams not in the ECAC. These games typically take place at the beginning of the season in October and around the Thanksgiving and New Year holidays. RPI also plays one non-conference game against their Capital District geographic rival, Union, at the Times Union Center, typically on the last Saturday of January in what has become known as the Mayor's Cup. RPI has opened ECAC Hockey conference play on the last weekend of October against Union since the 2012-13 season. The first conference home game is known as Black Friday or Black Saturday which alternates each year. Other highlights of the season include the Big Red Freakout, which is played on the last or second to last Saturday home game in February.

At the conclusion of the regular season the team will play a minimum of two postseason games in the ECAC Hockey Men's Ice Hockey Tournament in the beginning of March. If RPI wins the ECAC Tournament or is invited to the NCAA Tournament as an at-large team, they would then play at least one postseason game in late March in the single elimination tournament. RPI last played in the NCAA Tournament in 2011.

Season-by-season results[8]

Records vs. Current ECAC Hockey Teams

As of the completion of 2018–19 season[9]

School Team Away Arena Overall Record Win % Last Result
Brown University Bears Meehan Auditorium 63–30–9 .662 0-3 L
Clarkson University Golden Knights  Cheel Arena 51–97–11 .355 2-5 L
Colgate University  Raiders  Class of 1965 Arena 65–63–5 .508 1-2 L (OT)
Cornell University  Big Red  Lynah Rink  38–63–11 .388 3-2 W
Dartmouth College  Big Green  Thompson Arena  46–42–11 .520 2-5 L
Harvard University Crimson  Bright-Landry Hockey Center 37–58–8 .398 1-3 L
Princeton University Tigers Hobey Baker Memorial Rink 69–37–11 .637 6-2 W
Quinnipiac University  Bobcats  People's United Center 7–17–9 .348 1-2
St. Lawrence University Saints  Appleton Arena 60–83–7 .423 6-5 W
Union College  Dutchmen  Achilles Rink 53–40–11 .563 0-0 T
Yale University Bulldogs  Ingalls Rink 57–52–6 .522 0-4 L

Head Coaches

As of the completion of 2018–19 season[10]

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1902–1904, 1906–1917, 1923–1924 No Coach 15 14–34–3 .304
1917–1923 Leroy Clark 6 3–17–1 .167
1924–1925 W. J. Cook 1 2–2–0 .500
1925–1931, 1936–1937 Marvin Callan 8 6–20–2 .250
1949–1963 Ned Harkness 14 176–96–7 .643
1963–1964 Rube Bjorkman 1 18–8–0 .692
1964–1969 Garry Kearns 5 44–63–4 .414
1969–1972 Leon Abbott 3 41–31–4 .566
1972–1979 Jim Salfi 7 103–94–7 .522
1979–1989 Mike Addesa 10 186–124–9 .597
1989–1994 Buddy Powers 5 94–63–13 .591
1994–2006 Dan Fridgen 12 211–193–38 .520
2006–2017 Seth Appert 11 152–221–48 .418
2017–Present Dave Smith 2 16–50–7 .267
Totals 13 coaches 100 seasons 1066–1016–143 .511

Current roster

As of September 5, 2019.[11]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team NHL rights
1 British Columbia Linden Marshall Junior G 6' 3" (1.91 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1998-07-21 Victoria, British Columbia Trail (BCHL)
2 Tennessee Simon Kjellberg Freshman D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 2000-02-17 Nashville, Tennessee Dubuque (USHL) NYR, 163rd overall 2018
3 Minnesota T. J. Samec Senior D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1995-05-03 Saint Paul, Minnesota Brookings (NAHL)
4 Colorado Mason Klee Freshman D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1999-10-04 Morrison, Colorado Sioux Falls (USHL)
6 South Dakota Brady Ferner Sophomore D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-08-27 Dakota Dunes, South Dakota Sioux City (USHL)
7 Michigan Nick Bowman Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1997-12-19 Shelby Township, Michigan Coulee Region (NAHL)
8 Pennsylvania Mike Gornall Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1994-10-26 Irwin, Pennsylvania North Dakota (NCHC)
9 Michigan Tristan Ashbrook Freshman F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-07-16 Manistique, Michigan Lincoln (USHL)
11 Finland Ottoville Leppänen Sophomore F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1998-06-18 Espoo, Finland Blues U20 (Nuorten SM-liiga)
12 Connecticut Chase Zieky Senior F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1996-03-24 Avon, Connecticut Providence (HEA)
13 Alberta Tommy Lee Sophomore F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 160 lb (73 kg) 1997-12-07 Calgary, Alberta Chilliwack (BCHL)
14 Illinois Zach Dubinsky Freshman F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 2000-03-14 Highland Park, Illinois Lincoln (USHL)
16 California Rory Herrman Freshman F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1999-03-16 Poway, California Fargo (USHL)
17 Arizona Todd Burgess Senior F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1996-04-03 Phoenix, Arizona Fairbanks (USHL) OTT, 103rd overall 2016
18 Michigan Daniel DiGrande Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1997-08-05 Macomb, Michigan Green Bay (USHL)
19 Virginia Ture Linden Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-07-06 Great Falls, Virginia Lone Star (NAHL)
20 Wisconsin Billy Jerry Junior F 6' 4" (1.93 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-11-21 River Falls, Wisconsin Madison (USHL)
21 Texas Louie Helsen Freshman D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1998-06-08 Dallas, Texas Amarillo (NAHL)
22 Alberta Cory Babichuk Freshman D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-09-28 Edmonton, Alberta Spruce Grove (AJHL)
23 Minnesota Jake Johnson Sophomore D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1998-08-13 Bloomington, Minnesota Cedar Rapids (USHL)
24 Ontario Will Reilly Senior D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1997-07-23 Toronto, Ontario Nanaimo (BCHL) PIT, 217th overall 2017
25 Ontario Ryan Mahshie Freshman F 6' 3" (1.91 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1999-04-05 Stoney Creek, Ontario Brooks (AJHL)
26 New York (state) Jake Marrello Senior F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1997-08-04 Slingerlands, New York P. A. L. (USPHL)
27 Alberta Shane Bear Senior D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1997-02-17 Calgary, Alberta Brooks (AJHL)
28 New Jersey Kyle Hallbauer Sophomore D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-03-02 Howell, New Jersey Lone Star (NAHL)
29 New York (state) Patrick Polino Senior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1995-04-11 Buffalo, New York Lincoln (USHL)
31 Ontario Owen Savory Sophomore G 6' 0" (1.83 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1997-10-11 Cambridge, Ontario St. Catharines (GOJHL)
38 Michigan Alec Calvaruso Freshman G 6' 2" (1.88 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1998-07-09 Livonia, Michigan Sioux Falls (USHL)
39 Slovakia Jakub Lacka Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1998-11-20 Bratislava, Slovakia Central Illinois (USHL)

Statistical Leaders[12]

Career points leaders

Player Years GP G A Pts PIM
Frank Chiarelli 1951–1955 80 155 110 265 43
John Carter 1982–1986 131 117 108 225 207
Adam Oates 1982–1985 98 66 150 216 52
Bob Brinkworth 1961–1964 71 110 106 216 20
Joé Juneau 1987–1991 124 69 144 213 157
Paul Midghall 1956–1959 63 93 118 211 118
Abbie Moore 1951–1954 61 102 104 206 22
Bryan Richardson 1992–1996 141 80 113 193 146
Jerry Knightley 1962–1965 71 90 97 187 99
Mark Jooris 1982–1986 117 84 99 183 70

Career Goaltending Leaders

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average

Minimum 540 minutes

Player Years GP Min W L T GA SO SV% GAA
Jason Kasdorf 2012–2016 88 5025 38 37 9 200 7 .920 2.39
Allen York 2008–2011 83 4898 37 34 8 202 4 .914 2.47
Nathan Marsters 2000–2004 115 6638 57 50 6 282 10 .917 2.55
Bryce Merriam 2009–2013 56 3102 18 30 5 134 3 .903 2.59
Joel Laing 1996–2000 93 5345 52 31 6 231 13 .926 2.59

Statistics current through the start of the 2019-20 season.


Awards and honors


NCAA

Individual Awards

All-Americans

AHCA First Team All-Americans

AHCA Second Team All-Americans


ECAC Hockey

Individual Awards

All-Conference

First Team All-ECAC Hockey

Second Team All-ECAC Hockey

Third Team All-ECAC Hockey

  • 2005–06: Keith McWilliams, D; Kevin Croxton, F
  • 2006–07: Jake Luthise, D
  • 2010–11: Allen York, G

ECAC Hockey All-Rookie Team

Engineers in the NHL[15]

= NHL All-Star Team = NHL All-Star[16] = NHL All-Star[16] and NHL All-Star Team = Hall of Famers

References

  1. ^ Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Brand Style Guidelines (PDF). Retrieved June 12, 2016.
  2. ^ "RPI Engineers – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Athletics Facilities".
  3. ^ "Inside College Hockey – Rensselaer Engineers".
  4. ^ a b c d e "Statistics". USCHO.com.
  5. ^ "ECAC Hockey" (PDF).
  6. ^ "RPI Hockey FAQ". Retrieved 2010-03-03.
  7. ^ "at the beginning of the Hockey Line". RPI History Revealed. 2009-09-08. Archived from the original on 2011-07-18. Retrieved 2010-03-08.
  8. ^ "Rensselaer Men's Hockey Results by Season" (PDF). RPI Engineers. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  9. ^ "Rensselaer Men's Hockey Record vs. Opponents" (PDF). RPI Engineers. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  10. ^ "Rensselaer Men's Hockey Head Coaches" (PDF). RPI Engineers. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  11. ^ "RPI Engineers – 2018–19 Men's Hockey Roster".
  12. ^ "Rensselaer Men's Hockey Career Records" (PDF). RPI Engineers. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  13. ^ "Legends of Hockey". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  14. ^ "United States Hockey Hall of Fame". Hockey Central.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  15. ^ "Alumni report for R.P.I." Hockey DB. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Players are identified as an All-Star if they were selected for the All-Star game at any time in their career.

External links

This page was last edited on 2 December 2019, at 23:11
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