To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Questacon - the National Science and Technology Centre
Questacon logo.svg
280px
Questacon.jpg
Established1986 (opened in 1988)
LocationParkes, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
TypeScience
Visitors500 000 per year since 2016
DirectorProfessor Graham Durant
Websitewww.questacon.edu.au

Questacon – the National Science and Technology Centre, is an interactive science communication facility in Canberra, Australia. It is a museum with more than 200 interactive exhibits relating to science and technology. It has many science programs that are intended to inspire the children of Australia to love science.

Complimenting the main museum, Questacon Science Circus is an outreach program and is the most extensive science outreach program of its kind in the world. Each year, the Science Circus engages with more than 100,000 people, travels 25,000 kilometers, runs professional development courses for 600 teachers and visits about 30 remote aboriginal communities as well as hospitals, nursing homes and special schools.

History

Questacon is an interactive science centre that began as a project of the Australian National University (ANU), in spare space at the Ainslie Public School in Canberra.[1] It opened with 15 exhibits and was staffed entirely by volunteers by ANU physics lecturer Professor Mike Gore AM, inspired him to develop Australia's first interactive science centre, based on the Exploratorium in San Francisco. The name 'Questacon' combines two words— 'quest' meaning 'to discover' and 'con' meaning 'to study'. Professor Gore went on to become the founding Director of Questacon and in 2015, he got an Australia Day honour for his service to science.[2]

Questacon's current building was Japan's present to Australia for the 1988 Bicentenary and it was opened on 23 November 1988. Japanese government and business contributed ¥1 billion, half of the capital cost of A$19.64 million.[3] Questacon was formerly housed at the old Ainslie Primary School.[1]

As of 2021, the director is Professor Graham Durant, who had been in the position since 2003.[4] Questacon's vision is "a better future for all Australians through engagement with science and innovation".[5]

Galleries

In 2020, there were almost a dozen galleries of exhibitions at the same time. The list was:[6]

  • The Foyer has Robots, the Clockwork Universe, the Cam Wave and the Shop.
  • Fundamental Exhibition explore Classic Science in different ways.
  • Awesome Earth Exhibition looks at natural disasters and geology, featuring a Tesla coil and an earthquake simulator.
  • Q Lab has dynamic experiment space designed to inspire the inner scientist and also includes the Questacon Beehive.
  • The Shed is an innovative and creative place within Questacon dedicated to experimentation with ideas, tools, science, technologies, and art.
  • MiniQ is an exhibition designed for children between the ages of 0 and 6. Exhibits include a water play area, a construction zone, and a quiet area.
  • Excite@Q is spectacular scientific phenomena including Robot Hockey and the Freefall slide
  • Australia in Space looks to future space exploration
  • Mars Gallery has displays from ancient mythologies to modern interactive media.
  • Science Garden has some inspiring sculptures designed to be interactive
  • Even the Ramp has photographic and interactive displays

As of 2019, there are about 500,000 visitors per year.[7] The galleries are staffed by 200 paid staff, as well as team of about 60 volunteers.[4] The volunteers occasionally will make use of Discovery Trolleys, featuring smaller, hands-on exhibits related to the gallery.

Science theatre

The centre also features a number of performance spaces, used for presentations for general public and student audiences by Questacon's in-house theatre troupe, the "Excited Particles". The Excited Particles also perform puppet shows for young children.

Nkrypt

Nkrypt is a sculpture installation outside the Questacon building that consists of eight laser-etched stainless steel poles that each carry an encoded message.[8] The outdoor exhibit was installed as a part of the Centenary of Canberra and a prize was offered to the first person to solve the puzzle.[9] This was solved in December 2013.[10]

Questacon Technology Learning Centre

The Questacon Technology Learning Centre is located at the Royal Australian Mint's former administration building in Deakin and houses more than 80 staff. All of the outreach programs and the exhibition developers, including researchers, designers and electronics, metal and wood shop staff are based there. There are also an exhibition area and spaces for booked technology workshops and holiday programs.[11]

Outreach programs

In addition to the exhibitions in Canberra, Questacon runs the Questacon Science Circus and Engineering is Elementary nationally and Q2U in the Canberra region. Past outreach programs run by Questacon include the Tenix Questacon Maths Squad, NRMA Roadzone, NRMA Tomorrow's Drivers, Starlab, Questacon Smart Moves, Questacon Science Play, Questacon Science Squad and a range of activities in remote Indigenous communities.

Questacon Science Circus

The Questacon Science Circus outreach program trailer at Boorowa, New South Wales
The Questacon Science Circus outreach program trailer at Boorowa, New South Wales

The Questacon Science Circus is an outreach program of Questacon and is the most extensive science outreach program of its kind in the world. Each year, the Science Circus engages with more than 100,000 people, travels 25,000 kilometers, runs professional development courses for 600 teachers and visits about 30 remote aboriginal communities as well as hospitals, nursing homes and special schools.

The Questacon Science Circus is a partnership between Questacon and the Australian National University. The Science Circus won the Prime Minister's Award for Community Business Partnerships in 2006.[12]

Fifteen or sixteen science graduates staff the Science Circus as it travels, bringing lively presentations of science to towns and schools. The Science Circus also supports the teaching of science and technology by running practical and fun professional development workshops for teachers. While working for the Science Circus, each presenter also completes a Masters of Science Communication Outreach through the Centre for the Public Awareness of Science at the Australian National University. Coursework includes studies in print media, program evaluation and exhibition design.

Every year the Science Circus presenters graduate from the course and a new team are selected. The first team graduated in 1988 and there are now over 300 Science Circus graduates. Graduates have contributed to programs on Australian Broadcasting Corporation Radio, the Diffusion Science Radio Show, Cosmos Magazine, and the Mr Science Show podcast.

Photographs

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Questacon History Fact Sheet" (PDF). Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. 1 November 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  2. ^ "Australia Day honours: NDIS advocate, Questacon founder among Canberrans recognised". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 26 January 2015. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  3. ^ "Questacon and Japan". Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original on 6 March 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Staff, Management and Council". Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original on 15 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  5. ^ "2005-06 A Year of High Energy and Achievement" (PDF). Questacon. Australia's National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 August 2007. Retrieved 30 August 2007.
  6. ^ "Questacon Galleries". Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  7. ^ "About Questacon". Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021. Retrieved 23 April 2021.
  8. ^ "Nkrypt". Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original on 17 March 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  9. ^ "Questacon Centenary Code Challenge". Canberra 100. Archived from the original on 4 January 2013. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  10. ^ "Centenary Code Challenge solved at Questacon" (PDF). Questacon. The National Science and Technology Centre. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  11. ^ Inman, Michael (29 December 2012). "Inventive technology in mint condition". Canberra Times. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  12. ^ Howard, John. "National Recognition for Business and Community Partnerships". PM Transcripts. Australian Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 23 April 2021.

External links

This page was last edited on 3 May 2021, at 22:02
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.