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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pronunciation is the way in which a word or a language is spoken. This may refer to generally agreed-upon sequences of sounds used in speaking a given word or language in a specific dialect ("correct pronunciation") or simply the way a particular individual speaks a word or language.

Contested or widely mispronounced words are typically verified by the sources from which they originate, such as names of cities and towns or the word GIF (Graphics Interchange Format). [1]

A word can be spoken in different ways by various individuals or groups, depending on many factors, such as: the duration of the cultural exposure of their childhood, the location of their current residence, speech or voice disorders,[2] their ethnic group, their social class, or their education.[3]

Linguistic terminology

Syllables are counted as units of sound (phones) that they use in their language. The branch of linguistics which studies these units of sound is phonetics. Phones which play the same role are grouped together into classes called phonemes; the study of these is phonemics or phonematics or phonology. Phones as components of articulation are usually described using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Gif's inventor says ignore dictionaries and say 'Jif'". May 22, 2013 – via www.bbc.com.
  2. ^ Beech, John R.; Harding, Leonora; Hilton-Jones, Diana (1993). "Assessment of Articulation and Phonology". In Grunwell, Pam (ed.). Assessment in Speech and Language Therapy. CUP Archive. p. 55. ISBN 0-415-07882-2.
  3. ^ Paulston, Christina Bratt; Tucker, G. Richard (February 14, 2003). "Some Sociolinguistic Principles". In Labov, William (ed.). Sociolinguistics: The Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 234–250. ISBN 0-631-22717-2.
  4. ^ Schultz, Tanja (June 12, 2006). "Language Characteristics". In Kirchhoff, Katrin (ed.). Multilingual Speech Processing. Elsevier. p. 12. ISBN 0-12-088501-8.

External links


This page was last edited on 21 May 2021, at 05:50
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