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Political science of religion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The political science of religion (also referred to as politicology of religion or politology of religion) is one of the youngest disciplines in the political sciences that deals with a study of influence that religion has on politics and vice versa with a focus on the relationship between the subjects (actors) in politics in the narrow sense: government, political parties, pressure groups, and religious communities. It was established in the last decades of the twentieth century.

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Transcription

In 2008, the big Republican presidential candidates were asked: "How many of you believe in Darwinian biological evolution?" Two-thirds or three-quarters said, "I do." In 2012, the same question was asked, same group of people—Republican presidential candidates—and it was already down to a third. In 2016, the 17 main candidates for the Republican nomination were asked: "Do you believe in evolution?" One, Jeb Bush, brave Jeb Bush, said he did—"but," he said, walking it back even as he said it, “I’m not sure it should be taught in our public schools, and if it is, it should be taught along with Creationism.” So from 2008 to 2016, that was the change and that change is—I don’t believe all those people believed what they said; I don’t think all of them disbelieve in evolution, just some of them—but they were all obliged to say yes to falsehood and magical thinking of this religious kind and that’s where it becomes problematic. America has always been a Christian nation. That meant a very different thing 100 years ago or even 50 years ago than it means today. I grew up not going to church very often at all and not with much religious education, but all of my friends were weekly, regular churchgoers of various kinds. Christian Protestant religion became extreme, it became more magical and supernatural in its beliefs and practices in America than it had been in hundreds of years and more so than it is anywhere else in the developed world. So you have that happening. At the same time, not coincidentally, you have the Republican Party, beginning certainly about 30 years ago, becoming more and more a party of those religiously extreme Protestants. So one thing that has happened and one thing that has led, I think, the Republican Party to accept fantasy and wishful untruth more and more into its approach to policy—whether it’s climate change or the idea that a secret Muslim conspiracy is about to replace our constitutional judiciary system with Sharia law, or any number of other simply untrue tenants of republicanism—all these things which were nutty fringe ideas as recently as 30 years ago are now in the Republican mainstream. I think there’s a connection. I think once you have a political party, more and more of whose members believe in religious and supernatural fantasies of a more and more extravagant kind, it stands to reason or to unreason that you will have a party that is more and more inclined to embrace the fantastical in its politics and policy. Believe whatever you want in the privacy of your home, in the privacy of your family, in the privacy of your church, but when it bleeds over, as it inevitably has done in America, to how we manage and construct our economy and our society, we’re in trouble.

Contents

Research areas

The basic research areas of the political science of religion are:

  • All aspects of religious teachings and practices that have direct political contents and messages, such as religious understanding of government, power, political authority, state, political organizing, war, peace, etc.;
  • All aspects of religious behavior and practice that don’t have direct political contents and messages but do have direct political consequences, such as building of religious edifices, pilgrimages, etc.;
  • Attitudes and positions of political subjects in the narrow sense towards religion and religious communities, such as that of political parties and pressure groups towards religion and religious communities;
  • Everything within apparently completely secular public behavior with no religious motives that causes religious consequences, such as an economic monopoly achieved by a religious group within a multi-confessional society – it cannot but cause political consequences.

These fields of research are in constant development. The newest area of research in political science of religion is on the subject of religion and international relations.

History

The political science of religion or politology of religion was established as an academic discipline in 1993 at the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Belgrade, Serbia.[1] The founder of this discipline is Dr Miroljub Jevtic; http://www.fpn.bg.ac.rs/en/undergraduate-studies/political-department/third-year/ . In 2006, Georgetown University established the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs as one of the first American university research centers devoted to issues surrounding the political science of religion.

The Politics and Religion Journal was founded by the Center for Study of Religion and Religious Tolerance in Belgrade, Serbia in 2007.[2] Its spiritus movens and editor in chief is Miroljub Jevtić, professor at the Faculty of Political Science, University of Belgrade, Serbia. The journal Politics and Religion, produced by Cambridge Journals, published its first volume in 2008.[3]

The political science of religion is studied at almost all universities and political science departments in the United States. The American Political Science Association has a religion and politics section.[4]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-02-10. Retrieved 2009-03-18.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-10-28. Retrieved 2009-04-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Politics and Religion
  4. ^ “Religion and Politics”

References

  • Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University, http://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu
  • Religion and Foreign Policy Initiative, Council on Foreign Relations, http://www.cfr.org/religion.
  • Miroljub Jevtic, Politology of Religion,Center for Study of Religion and Religious Tolerance, Belgrade,2009,ISBN 978-86-87243-01-9, COBISS.SR-ID 169417996
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Political Relations and Religion,Center for Study of Religion and Religious Tolerance, Belgrade,2011,ISBN 978-86-87243-06-4, COBISS.SR-ID 187288
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Problems of Politology of Religion,Center for Study of Religion and Religious Tolerance, Belgrade,2012,ISBN 978-86-87243-08-8
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Religion as a Political Science Research Subject,in Religion and Politics,ed. South-West University "Neofit Rilski", Faculty of Law and History, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria,2005,pp. 45–46;
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Religija i politika-Uvod u Politikologiju religije(Religion and Politics-Introduction into Politology of Religion) ed. Institut for Political Studies and Department of Political Science, Belgrad,2002,pp. 15;
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Political Science and Religion,in Politics and Religion,journal, 1/2007,Belgrade,pp. 59–69; https://web.archive.org/web/20140221223426/http://www.politicsandreligionjournal.com/images/pdf_files/engleski/volume1_no1/political_science_and_religion.pdf
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Nabozenstvo a politika:Teoreticky Pristup(Religion and Politics:Theoretical Approach)in:2007 Rocenka Ustavu pre vztahy statu a cirkvi(Institut for State-Church Relations)Bratislava,2008, Slovakia,pp. 104–105;
  • Miroljub Jevtic, Religion and Power-Essays on Politology of Religion, ed. Prizren : Dioceze of Ras-Prizren and Kosovo-Metohija, Belgrade : Center for study of religion and religious tolerance, 2008,ISBN 978-86-82323-29-7,COBISS.SR-ID:153597452,pp. 268–269
  • Miroljub Jevtic,Religion as a Political Science Research Subject,in Vjera i politika(The Faith and Politics)ed.Filozofsko-teoloski Institut druzbe Isusove,Zagreb,Croatia,2009,ISBN 978-953-231-076-4,pp. 121–122
  • Miroljub Jevtic, Theoretical Relationsship Between Religion and Politics, “Indian Journal of Political Science" (IJPS) Vol. LXX, no 2, April/Juin 2009, pp. 409–418, ISSN 0019-5510

Further reading

  • Pettman, Ralph (2004): Reason, Culture, Religion: The Metaphysics of World Politics, Palgrave, London and New York.
  • "Indian Controversies: Essays on Religion in Politics" by Arun Shourie, Publishers: Rupa & Co, South Asia Books, A S A Publications, Language: English

External links

This page was last edited on 22 February 2019, at 18:46
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