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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phacochoerus
Southern warthog (Phacochoerus africanus sundevallii) male.jpg
Male Common warthog
Phacochoerus africanus
Tswalu Kalahari Reserve, South Africa
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Suidae
Subfamily: Phacochoerinae
Genus: Phacochoerus
F. Cuvier, 1826
Species

Phacochoerus aethiopicus
Phacochoerus africanus

Phacochoerus is a genus in the family Suidae, commonly known as warthogs. It is the sole genus of subfamily Phacochoerinae. They are found in open and semiopen habitats, even in quite arid regions, in sub-Saharan Africa. The two species were formerly considered conspecific under the scientific name Phacochoerus aethiopicus, but today this is limited to the desert warthog, while the best-known and most widespread species, the common warthog (or simply warthog) is Phacochoerus africanus.[1]

Skull
Skull

Although covered in bristly hairs, their bodies and heads appear largely naked from a distance, with only the crest along the back, and the tufts on their cheeks and tails being obviously haired. The English name refers to their facial wattles, which are particularly distinct in males. They also have very distinct tusks, which reach a length of 25.5 to 63.5 cm (10.0 to 25.0 in) in the males, but are always smaller in the females.[2] They are largely herbivorous, but occasionally also eat small animal food.[3] While both species remain fairly common and widespread, and therefore are considered to be of Least Concern by the IUCN, the nominate subspecies of the desert warthog, commonly known as the Cape warthog, became extinct around 1865.[4]

Species in taxonomic order

The genus Phacochoerus contains two species.

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
Nolan warthog (Phacochoerus africanus africanus).jpg
Phacochoerus africanus Common warthog northern Kenya, Somalia, and eastern Ethiopia.
African Warthog - Phacochoerus aethiopicus.jpg
Phacochoerus aethiopicus Desert warthog northern Kenya and Somalia, and possibly Djibouti, Eritrea, and Ethiopia.

References

  1. ^ Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ Novak, R. M. (editor) (1999). Walker's Mammals of the World. Vol. 2. 6th edition. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. ISBN 0-8018-5789-9
  3. ^ Kingdon, J. (1997). The Kingdon Guide to African Mammals. Academic Press Limited, London. ISBN 0-12-408355-2
  4. ^ d'Huart, J.P.; Butynski, T.M.M. & De Jong, Y. (2008). "Phacochoerus aethiopicus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 20 April 2010.

External links

This page was last edited on 2 May 2019, at 15:01
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