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Peter B. Gillis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Peter B. Gillis
Atl Comic Con 2018 - Peter B. Gillis.jpg
Gillis in 2018
BornPeter B. Gillis
(1952-12-19) December 19, 1952 (age 69)
White Plains, New York
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Writer
Notable works
Shatter
Warp
Strikeforce: Morituri
Doctor Strange
Peter Gillis Homepage

Peter B. Gillis (born December 19, 1952)[1] is an American comic book writer best known for his work at Marvel Comics and First Comics in the mid-1980s, including the series Strikeforce: Morituri and the digitally drawn comic series Shatter.

Biography

Peter B. Gillis' first work in the comics industry was as a freelance writer for Marvel Comics. His first published comics story was "Saturday Night Furor" in Captain America #224 (Aug. 1978).[2] He then wrote various issues of Marvel Two-In-One, What If...?, and Super-Villain Team-Up from 1978 to 1980. The irregular publishing frequency of the final issues of Super-Villain Team-Up was due to a legal maneuver to prevent DC Comics from trademarking the term "supervillain".[3] Starting in 1980, Gillis then worked as editorial director for the Florida-based publisher New Media Publishing's new line of magazines; he left that position in June 1981.[4]

He is best known for the digital comic Shatter (1985–1988) and First Comics' Warp (1983–1985). Gillis co-created Strikeforce: Morituri (1986–1988) with artist Brent Anderson. Gillis wrote the entire runs of Micronauts: The New Voyages (1984–1986)[5] and Strange Tales vol. 2 (1987–1988); other Marvel work included numerous issues of What If (1980–1984), The Defenders (1984–1986),[6] The Eternals vol. 2 (1985–1986), Doctor Strange vol. 2 #76–81 (1986–1987) and Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme #1–4 (1988–1989). The Defenders was Gillis's first ongoing assignment; he recounted, "I had been working for a while at Marvel, and was constantly pumping for more work, and specifically a series of my own. So when I heard DeMatteis was leaving Defenders, I was in [editor] Carl Potts' office like a shot, and I got the gig."[6]

His creations for other companies include Blaze Barlow and the Eternity Command and the Black Flame for First Comics; and Gammarauders, a tie-in to the Gamma World role-playing game, for DC Comics' short-lived TSR Games line. He also wrote the science-fiction miniseries Tailgunner Jo with art by Tom Artis for DC.

Gillis returned to comics in 2010 when he wrote the six-issue comic adaptation of Peter S. Beagle's The Last Unicorn for IDW Publishing.[7]

Bibliography

Comico

DC Comics

First Comics

  • First Adventures #1–4 (1985–1986)
  • Grimjack #7, 31 (1985–1987)
  • Jon Sable, Freelance #25 (1985)
  • Mars #2–8 (1984)
  • Shatter #1–12 (1985–1987)
  • Starslayer #20–33 (1984–1985)
  • Warp #1–19, Special #1–3 (1983–1985)

IDW Publishing

Marvel Comics

References

  1. ^ Miller, John Jackson (June 10, 2005). "Comics Industry Birthdays". Comics Buyer's Guide. Iola, Wisconsin. Archived from the original on February 18, 2011. Retrieved December 12, 2010.
  2. ^ Peter Gillis at the Grand Comics Database and Peter B. Gillis at the Grand Comics Database
  3. ^ Carson, Lex (August 2013). "Bring Together the Bad Guys: Super-Villain Team-Up". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (66): 41. The revival and annual publication of SVTU was part of the legal maneuvering on Marvel's part to keep DC from trademarking the term 'Super Villain' as in 'Secret Society of'. For that, annual publication was enough, and by the second year, the legal tussle was resolved.
  4. ^ "NMP Editorial Shake-Up". Comics Feature. New Media Publishing (12/13): 18. September–October 1981.
  5. ^ Lantz, James Heath (October 2014). "Inner-Space Opera: A Look at Marvel's Micronauts Comics". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (76): 51–53.
  6. ^ a b DeAngelo, Daniel (July 2013). "The Not-Ready-For-Super-Team Players A History of the Defenders". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (65): 15–16.
  7. ^ "The Last Unicorn". Publishers Weekly. n.d. Archived from the original on August 29, 2015.

External links

Preceded by
various
What If...? writer
1983–1984
Succeeded by
n/a
Preceded by Starslayer writer
with John Ostrander

1984–1985
Succeeded by
John Ostrander
Preceded by The Defenders writer
1984–1986
Succeeded by
n/a
Preceded by
n/a
The Eternals vol. 2 writer
1985–1986
Succeeded by
Preceded by Doctor Strange vol. 2 writer
1986–1987
Succeeded by
n/a
Preceded by
n/a
Strikeforce: Morituri writer
1986–1988
Succeeded by
This page was last edited on 6 April 2021, at 01:02
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