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Pershing House

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pershing House
Pershing House, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas.jpg
Pershing House
Fort Sam Houston
Pershing House is located in Texas
Pershing House
Pershing House
Pershing House is located in the United States
Pershing House
Pershing House
LocationStaff Post Rd., Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas
 United States
Coordinates29°26′42″N 98°28′10″W / 29.44500°N 98.46944°W / 29.44500; -98.46944
ArchitectAlfred Giles
Part ofFort Sam Houston (#75001950)
NRHP reference #74002058[1]
Added to NRHPJuly 30, 1974

The Pershing House is located on Fort Sam Houston, in the Bexar County city of San Antonio in the U.S. state of Texas. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Bexar County, Texas on July 30, 1974. Although this Commanding General housing was actually constructed in 1881, it has been referred to by its current name since John J. Pershing served as the base Commandant in 1917. Architect Alfred Giles was contracted to design the 10,830 square feet (1,000 m2), two-story house. In various phases during the 20th century, improvements have included the installation of electricity and air conditioning. The porch is now enclosed, and the plumbing upgraded.[2]

At one point in its existence, Fort Sam Houston was the largest Army post within the United States.[3] The commanding officers who have called the house a home were some of the most accomplished leaders in the United States Army prior to their being given charge of the base. Numerous Medal of Honor recipients have lived in the house.[2] Almost half of the base commandants were buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Pershing had been transferred to Fort Sam Houston from Fort Bliss, following his participation in the Pancho Villa Expedition. He would only be at Fort Sam Houston for two months before being given charge of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe.[4] Pershing held the highest rank ever given an American army officer, and was one of the architects of the Treaty of Versailles.[5]

The names of the house's residents appear on a plaque presented to Fort Sam Houston by Julia Cotton White, wife of base commandant General Isaac D. White. The plaque continues to be updated as an historical record of who lived there. Mrs. White died in 1989.[2]

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Transcription

Contents

Residents of Pershing House

Fort Sam Houston commandants who lived at Pershing House
Residency Name Image Birth–Death Burial Notes Refs
1881–83 Brigadier General Christopher C. Augur
Christopher C. Augur - Brady-Handy.jpg
(1821–1898) Arlington National Cemetery American Civil War veteran [6]
1883 Brigadier General Ranald S. Mackenzie
RSMackenzie.jpg
(1840–1899) West Point Cemetery Red River War (1874), retired from the Army six months after arriving at Fort Sam Houston. [7]
1883–84 Lieutenant General John M. Schofield
SchofieldOfficialPortrait.jpg
(1831–1906) Arlington National Cemetery Medal of Honor July 2, 1892, for action at Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861. Later served as U.S. Secretary of War, Schofield Barracks named in his honor. [8][9]
1884–1892 Brigadier General David S. Stanley
David Sloane Stanley head.jpg
(1828–1902) United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery Medal of Honor March 29, 1893, for action at Franklin, Tennessee November 30, 1864 [8]
1892–95 Major General Frank Wheaton
FrankWheaton.jpg
(1833–1903) Arlington National Cemetery American Civil War veteran [10]
1895–97 Major General Zenas R. Bliss
Z R Bliss.jpg
(1835–1900) Arlington National Cemetery Medal of Honor awarded December 38, 1898, for action during the American Civil War at Fredericksburg, Virginia on December 13, 1862 [11]
1897–98 Major General William Montrose Graham, Jr.
William Montrose Graham, Jr.jpg
(1834–1916) Congressional Cemetery American Civil War veteran and nephew of George Meade [12]
1899–1901 Brigadier General Chambers McKibbin (1841–1918) Arlington National Cemetery American Civil War veteran [13]
1902–1904 Brigadier General Frederick Dent Grant
Frederick Dent Grant.jpg
(1850–1912) West Point Spanish–American War veteran [14][15]
1904–1906 Brigadier General Jesse M. Lee Served in the Philippines [14][16]
1906–1907 Brigadier General William S. McCaskey (1843–1914) San Francisco National Cemetery Informed George Armstrong Custer's widow about the Battle of the Little Bighorn [17]
1907–1910 Brigadier General Albert L. Myer
1910–1911 Brigadier General Ralph W. Hoyt
1911–1912 Brigadier General Joseph Wilson Duncan (1853–1912) Arlington National Cemetery Participated in the capture of Mount Dajo, Philippine Islands [18]
1913–1915 General Tasker H. Bliss
Gen Tasker H Bliss.JPG
(1853–1930) Arlington National Cemetery U.S. Army Chief of Staff, multiple awards and citations from multiple countries, USS Tasker H. Bliss (AP-42) named in his honor [19]
1915–1917 Major General Frederick Funston
MajGenFrederickFunston.jpg
(1865–1917) San Francisco National Cemetery Medal of Honor awarded February 10, 1900, for action Rio Grande de la Pampanga, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 27 April 1899 [20]
1917 General of the Armies of the United States John J. Pershing
General John Joseph Pershing head on shoulders.jpg
(1860–1948) Arlington National Cemetery Multiple international awards and recognitions, received the highest rank ever given an American army officer. Helped frame the Treaty of Versailles [4][5]
1917 Major General James Parker (1854–1934) Saint Marys Episcopal Churchyard Medal of Honor awarded March 8, 1902, for action at Vigan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 4 December 1899. [20]
1917–1918 Major General John Wilson Ruckman (1858–1921) West Point Distinguished Service Medal awarded 1926 for service during World War I [21]
1918 Major General Willard Ames Holbrook
Willard Ames Holbrook.jpg
(1860–1932) Arlington National Cemetery Distinguished Service Medal awarded 1919 for action at the Mexican–American border [22][23]
1918–1919 Major General DeRosey Carroll Cabell, Sr. (1861–1924) San Francisco National Cemetery Distinguished Service Medal for service during the Mexican Border Wars (1916–1918) [24]
1919–1921 Major General Joseph T. Dickman
JosephTDickman.jpg
(1857–1927) Arlington National Cemetery Multiple awards, USS Joseph T. Dickman (APA-13) named in his honor [25]
1921–1922 Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army John L. Hines
John L. Hines.jpg
(1868–1968) Arlington National Cemetery Multiple awards and recognitions; May 5, 2000, the United States Postal Service Distinguished Soldiers, a set of four stamps which featured Hines, Audie Murphy, Alvin York and Omar Bradley [26]
1922–1924 Major General Edward Mann Lewis
Major General E M Lewis
(1863–1949) San Francisco National Cemetery Distinguished Service Medal awarded 9 July 1919 for service during World War I Spanish–American War (Cited for Gallantry at the Battle of El Caney), The Philippines, United States occupation of Veracruz, Commanded the 8th Corps Area and the Hawaiian Department after WWI [27]
1924, 1925–1928 Major General Ernest J. Hinds (1864–1941) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery USS Ernest Hinds named in his honor
1924–1925 General Charles Pelot Summerall (1867–1955) Arlington National Cemetery Multiple awards, Chief of Staff United States Army [28]
1928 Major General Thomas Quinton Donaldson, Jr. (1864–1934) Arlington National Cemetery Inspector General, instructor of Military Science [29]
1928–1930 Major General William Lassiter Distinguished Service Medal for service in World War I, Silver Star Citation for service in the Spanish–American War [30]
1930–1933 Major General Ernest B. Winans
General Edwin Winans.jpg
(1869–1947) Distinguished Service Medal for his performance World War I in commandof the 64th Infantry Brigade, 32nd Division, 1st Army Corps, of the American Expeditionary Force [31]
1933–1934 Major General Johnson Hagood
MG Johnson Hagood.jpg
(1873–1948) Magnolia Cemetery World War I veteran whose memoirs were published as Caissons Go Rolling Along [32][33]
1936 Major General Frank Parker
Frank Parker.jpg
(1872–1947) Commander, 8th Corps Area, Fort Sam Houston, Tex., March–Sept 1936. Retired in 1936 [34][35]
1936–1940 Lieutenant General Herbert Jay Brees
Herbert J Brees.jpg
(1877–1958) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Distinguished Service Medal awarded 1919 for service in World War I, Silver Star Citation awarded 1922 for action in France September 27–28, 1918 [36]
1941–1942 General Walter Krueger
Krueger only.jpg
(1881–1967) Arlington National Cemetery World War II Commander Sixth United States Army in the South West Pacific Area; Walter Krueger Middle School named in his honor. [37]
1942–1943 General Courtney Hodges
Courtney Hodges.jpg
(1887–1966) Arlington National Cemetery World War II Commander First United States Army in Northwest Europe, multiple awards [38]
1944 General William Hood Simpson
William H. Simpson portrait.jpg
(1898–1990) Arlington National Cemetery World War II Commander U.S. Ninth Army in northern Europe, multiple awards [39]
1944–1945 General John P. Lucas
John P. Lucas.jpg
(1890–1949) Arlington National Cemetery A commander of VI Corps (September 1943 – February 1944) during the Italian Campaign of the Mediterranean Theater of World War II, multiple awards and recognitions [40]
1945 Lieutenant General Alexander Patch
Alexander Patch portrait.jpg
(1889–1945) West Point Cemetery Commanded both the U.S. Army and the United States Marine Corps forces during the invasion of Guadalcanal, and the Seventh Army in Operation Dragoon (the invasion of southern France). Died November 1945 at Brooke General Hospital [41]
1946–1947 General Jonathan M. Wainwright
Jonathan Wainright.jpg
(1883–1953) Arlington National Cemetery Medal of Honor awarded September 19, 1945, for March 12 to May 7, 1942 service in the Philippines [42]
1947–1949 4-star General Thomas T. Handy
Thomas Handy.jpg
(1892–1982) Arlington National Cemetery Deputy Chief of Staff, United States Army [43]
1949–1952 General LeRoy Lutes
LeRoy Lutes.jpg
(1890–1980) Arlington National Cemetery Dwight D. Eisenhower's General Staff as Director of the Service, Supply and Procurement Division, Distinguished Service Award for service 1962–1966 [44]
1952–1953 General William M. Hoge
William Hoge.jpg
(1894–1979) Arlington National Cemetery Directed the construction of the 1,519-mile (2,450 km) ALCAN Highway in nine months, commanded the Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group in the assault on Omaha Beach [45]
1953 General John E. Dahlquist
John E Dahlquist.jpg
(1896–1975) Arlington National Cemetery World War I division commander, multiple awards and recognitions [46]
1953–1955 General Isaac D. White
I.D. White;40-white l.jpg
(1901–1990) Unknown Commander, U.S. Army Pacific [47]
1955–1958 Lieutenant General John Howell Collier
John Howell Collier.jpg
(1899–1980) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery A commander of 2nd Armored Division units in World War II and as the Army's Chief of Armor. [48]
1958–1959 General Guy S. Meloy, Jr.
Guy S Meloy Jr.jpg
(1903–1964) Arlington National Cemetery Ccmmander of all U.S. forces in Korea during the Cold War [49]
1959–1961 Lieutenant General Edward Thomas Williams
Edward T. Williams.jpg
(1901–1973) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Chief of artillery for the Third United States Army in Europe during World War II, commander of the United States Army Field Artillery Center
1961–1962 Lieutenant General Donald Prentice Booth
Donald Prentice Booth.JPG
(1902–1993) Arlington National Cemetery Commanding General of Fourth Army 1961–1962. Retired as Lieutenant General on February 28, 1962 [50]
1962–64 Lieutenant General Carl H. Jark (1905–1984) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Distinguished service medal for service February 1952 – July 1964 [51][52]
1964–66 Lieutenant General Robert Wesley Colglazier, Jr. (1904–1993) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Distinguished Service Medals for service July 1959 – July 1964 and for service August 1964 – January 1966 [53]
1966–1967 Lieutenant General Thomas W. Dunn (1908–1983) West Point Distinguished Service Medal for service in Vietnam (February 1966 – June 1967) [54]
1967–1968 Lieutenant General Lawrence J. Lincoln (1909–2000) Arlington National Cemetery Three Distinguished Service Medals, one for service in World War II, two for service in Vietnam (August 1964 – June 1967) and (July 1967 – July 1968) [55]
1968–1971 Lieutenant General Harry H. Critz (1912–1982) Fort Sill Post Cemetery Distinguished Service Medal for service in the Vietnam War; Legion of Honor and Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster for service in the Korean War. [56]
1971 Lieutenant General George G. O'Connor
1971 4-star General George V. Underwood, Jr.
GEN Underwood, George V Jr.jpg
(1913–1984) Fort Bliss National Cemetery Army Distinguished Service Medal awarded for service in Vietnam July 1960 to January 1966 [57]
1971–1973 Lieutenant General Patrick F. Cassidy (1915–1990) Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Distinguished Service Cross awarded for action in France on June 11, 1944 [58]

See also

References

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c "Pershing House" (PDF). Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  3. ^ Leatherwood, Art. "Fort Sam Houston". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association.
  4. ^ a b Metz, Leon C. "John Joseph Pershing". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  5. ^ a b "John J. Pershing". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  6. ^ Wooster, Robert. "Christopher Columbus Augur". Handbook of Texas online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved September 10, 2012.; "Christopher Columbus Augur, Major General, United States Army". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  7. ^ Wallace, Ernest. "Ranald S. Mackenzie". Handbook of Texas online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  8. ^ a b "Medal of Honor Civil War M-Z". U.S. Army Center of Military History. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  9. ^ "Schofield Barracks". Armybases.org. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  10. ^ "Major General Frank Wheaton". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  11. ^ "Medal of Honor Recipients, Civil War A-L". Medal of Honor Recipients. U.S. Army Center of Military History. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  12. ^ Parker, James (1929). The Old Army: Memories, 1872–1918. Stackpole Books. p. 196. ISBN 9780811728973.
  13. ^ Report of the Adjutant General of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania. Adjutant-General's Office. 1905. p. 234.; "Chambers McKibbin". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  14. ^ a b Congressional serial set. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1904. p. 103.
  15. ^ "General Fred E. Grant Dies Suddenly in New York". Reading Eagle. April 12, 1912.
  16. ^ Annual Reports. United States War Department. 1903. pp. 131, 139, 204, 219, 222, 238, 269, 281.
  17. ^ "William Spencer McCaskey". Little Big Horn. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  18. ^ "Joseph Wilson Duncan". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  19. ^ "Tasker Howard Bliss". Men of Mark in America. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  20. ^ a b "Medal of Honor Philippine Insurrection". U.S. Army Center for Military History. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  21. ^ "Distinguished Service Medal John Wilson Ruckman". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  22. ^ "Willard Ames Holbrook". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  23. ^ "Distinguished Service Medal Williad Ames Holbrook". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  24. ^ "DSM DeRosey Carroll Cabell". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  25. ^ "Joseph Theodore Dickman". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  26. ^ "American War Hero Stamps". U.S. Army Center of Military History. Retrieved September 10, 2012.; "John Leonard Hines". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  27. ^ "Edward Mann Lewis". United States Army Pacific. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  28. ^ "Charles Pelot Summerall". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  29. ^ "Thomas Quinton Donaldson Jr". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  30. ^ "William Lassiter DSM and Silver Star". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  31. ^ "Major General Edwin B. Winans". United States Army, Pacific. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  32. ^ Hagood, Johnson; Grant, Larry A (2010). Caissons Go Rolling Along. University of South Carolina Press. ISBN 978-1-57003-915-7.
  33. ^ "Caissons Go Rolling Along". University of South Carolina Press. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  34. ^ Frank.html#d1e246 "Frank Parker Papers, 1890–1946" Check |url= value (help). UNC University Libraries. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  35. ^ "Major General Frank Parker". Third Army. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  36. ^ "Herbert J. Brees Citations". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  37. ^ "Walter Krueger Middle School". Northeast Independent School District. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012. Retrieved September 10, 2012.; "Walter Krueger". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  38. ^ "Personal Papers of Courtney Hicks Hodges" (PDF). Dwight D. Eisenhower Library. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  39. ^ "William Hood Simpson". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  40. ^ "The Generals of WWII". Lucas-Generals.dk. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  41. ^ "Patch-The Generals of WWII". Generals.dk. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  42. ^ "Medal of Honor Wainwright". U.S. Army Center of Military History. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  43. ^ "Thomas Troy Handy". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  44. ^ "Lutes DSA". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.; "LeRoy Lutes Papers" (PDF). Dwight D. Eisenhower Library. Retrieved September 10, 2012.; "LeRoy Lutes, Lieutenant General, United States Army". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  45. ^ "William M. Hoge". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  46. ^ "John Ernest Dahlquist". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  47. ^ "Isaac D. White". United States Army, Pacific. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  48. ^ "Collier-Generals from the USA". Generals.dk. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  49. ^ "Guy S. Meloy". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  50. ^ "Donald Prentice Booth". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  51. ^ "Carl H. Jark DSM". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  52. ^ "West Point Deaths". West Point. Archived from the original on September 12, 1999. Retrieved September 10, 2012.
  53. ^ "Robert Colglazier". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  54. ^ "Thomas W. Dunn DSM". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  55. ^ "Lawrence J. Lincoln DSMs". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  56. ^ "Harry H. Critz". Military Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  57. ^ "General George V. Underwood, Jr". The Military Memorial Museum. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  58. ^ "LTG Patrick Francis Cassidy". Military Hall of Honor. Retrieved January 7, 2018.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 September 2019, at 19:38
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