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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Types of peroxides, from top to bottom: peroxide ion, organic peroxide, organic hydroperoxide, peracid. The peroxide group is marked in blue. R, R1 and R2 mark hydrocarbon moieties.
Types of peroxides, from top to bottom: peroxide ion, organic peroxide, organic hydroperoxide, peracid. The peroxide group is marked in blue. R, R1 and R2 mark hydrocarbon moieties.

Peroxides are a group of compounds with the structure R−O−O−R.[1] The O−O group in a peroxide is called the peroxide group or peroxo group. In contrast to oxide ions, the oxygen atoms in the peroxide ion have an oxidation state of −1.

The most common peroxide is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), colloquially known simply as "peroxide". It is marketed as a solution in water at various concentrations. Since hydrogen peroxide is colorless, so are these solutions. It is mainly used as an oxidant and bleaching agent. However, hydrogen peroxide is also biochemically produced in the human body, largely as a result of a range of oxidase enzymes.[2] Concentrated solutions are potentially dangerous when in contact with organic compounds.

Structure and dimensions of H2O2.

Aside from hydrogen peroxide, some other major classes of peroxides are these:

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Transcription

References

  1. ^ IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") (1997). Online corrected version:  (2006–) "peroxides".
  2. ^ Halliwell, Barry; Clement, Marie Veronique; Long, Lee Hua (2000). "Hydrogen peroxide in the human body". FEBS Letters. 486 (1): 10–3. doi:10.1016/S0014-5793(00)02197-9. PMID 11108833.
This page was last edited on 17 August 2018, at 15:29
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