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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pat Flower
Born
Patricia Mary Byson Flower

23 February 1914
Ramsgate, Kent, England, United Kingdom
Died2 September 1977 (aged 63)
New South Wales, Australia
OccupationPlaywright, screenwriter, novelist
Spouse(s)Cedric Arthur Flower

Patricia Mary Byson Flower (23 February 1914 – 2 September 1977) was an English Australian writer of plays, television plays and novels.

Biography

She was born in Ramsgate, Kent, England and moved to Australia with her family in 1928. She originally worked as a secretary, writing radio plays and sketches in her spare time. She eventually moved on to writing crime novels and TV scripts.[1]

She wrote so many episodes of the ABC TV series Australian Playhouse one critic called it "The Pat Flower Show".[2]

She was married to Cedric Flower, an actor, costume designer, designer, playwright, director, playwright, producer and set designer (1920-2000)[3]

Flower committed suicide in New South Wales, Australia in September 1977.[4]

Select writings

Inspector Swinton series of crime novels

  • Wax Flowers for Gloria (1958)
  • Goodbye Sweet William (1959)
  • A Wreath of Water-Lilies (1960)[18]
  • One Rose Less (1961)[19]
  • Hell for Heather (1962)
  • Term of Terror (1963)
  • Fiends of the Family (1966)
  • Hunt the Body (1968)
  • Cobweb (1972)
  • Cat's Cradle (1973)[20]
  • Odd Job (1974)[21]
  • Slyboots (1974)
  • Vanishing Point (1975)
  • Crisscross (1976)[22]
  • Shadow Show (1976)

References

  1. ^ Hall, Sandra (21 October 1972). "BOOKS Lady into sofa". The Bulletin. p. 52.
  2. ^ a b "TELEVISION That silent report". The Canberra Times. 41 (11, 520). 28 October 1966. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Cedric Flower". AusStage.
  4. ^ Susan Lever, 'Flower, Patricia Mary Bryson (1914–1977)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/flower-patricia-mary-bryson-10207/text18039, published first in hardcopy 1996, accessed online 3 April 2015.
  5. ^ "CANBERRA REPERTORY Germany's most disputed play". The Canberra Times. 40 (11, 459). 4 May 1966. p. 23. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "New Theatre: "You've Never had it so good"!". Tribune (1438). New South Wales, Australia. 15 December 1965. p. 3. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "TELEVISION Gourmet and raconteur". The Canberra Times. 40 (11, 455). 29 April 1966. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Play by Australian author". The Canberra Times. 40 (11, 535). 1 August 1966. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "TV Not all the way". The Canberra Times. 40 (11, 533). 29 July 1966. p. 11. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "Special an the making of a movie". The Australian Women's Weekly. 34 (12). 17 August 1966. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "leisure — the arts POP CULT A BRAVE VENTURE IN LOCAL MUSIC". The Canberra Times. 40 (11, 504). 25 June 1966. p. 12. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "Untitled". The Canberra Times. 41 (11, 492). 26 September 1966. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "LOVELY LIZA". Tribune (1475). New South Wales, Australia. 7 September 1966. p. 10. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "TELEVISION". The Canberra Times. 41 (11, 482). 13 September 1966. p. 14. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "Prize for TV drama". The Canberra Times. 42 (11, 908). 27 January 1968. p. 12. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "Gilmore prize presented". Tribune (1551). New South Wales, Australia. 27 March 1968. p. 8. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Development opposed". The Canberra Times. 45 (12, 884). 9 August 1971. p. 15. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "YOUR BOOKSHELF". The Australian Women's Weekly. 27 (45). 13 April 1960. p. 31. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "YOUR BOOKSHELF with Joyce Halstead". The Australian Women's Weekly. 29 (12). 23 August 1961. p. 12. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "COMBINING ART AND CRIME". The Canberra Times. 47 (13, 529). 1 September 1973. p. 12. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "THE ROLE OF THE COOLER". The Canberra Times. 49 (13, 859). 13 September 1974. p. 10. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ "A MONOPOLISTIC PSYCHOPATH?". The Canberra Times. 50 (14, 463). 21 August 1976. p. 10. Retrieved 20 April 2018 – via National Library of Australia.

External links


This page was last edited on 29 December 2021, at 19:38
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