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Parts of Holland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lincolnshire, Parts of Holland
Holland shown within England

Area
 • 1901268,992 acres (1089 km²)
 • 1961267,847 acres (1083 km²)
Population
 • 190177,610
 • 1971105,685
History
 • Created1889
 • Abolished1974
 • Succeeded byLincolnshire
StatusAdministrative county
 • HQCounty Hall, Boston

The Parts of Holland is a historical subdivision used in south-east Lincolnshire, England from 1889 to 1974.[1] The name is still recognised locally and survives in the district of South Holland.

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Transcription

Welcome to the Great nation of Holland: where the tulips grow, the windmills turn, the breakfast is chocolatey, the people industrious, and the sea tries to drown it all. Except, this country isn't Holland. It's time for: The Difference Between Holland, the Netherlands (and a whole lot more) The correct name for this tulip growing, windmill building hagelslag eating, container ship moving, ocean conquering nation is the Netherlands. But confusion is understandable -- the general region been renamed a lot over a thousand including as: The Dutch Republic, The United States of Belgium, and The Kingdom of Hollande But it's not just history that makes this country's name confusing because the Netherlands is divided into twelve provinces: * Groningen * Drenthe * Overijssel * Gelderland * Limburg * Brabant * Zeeland (Which, by the way, is the Zeeland that makes this Zeeland, new) * Friesland (With adorable little hearts on its flag) * Flevoland * Utrecht, and here's the confusion: * Noord (North) Holland and * Zuid (South) Holland These provinces make calling the Netherlands 'Holland' like calling the United States 'Dakota'. Though unlike the Dakotas, which are mostly empty, save for the occasional Jackalope, the two Hollands are the most populated provinces and have some of the biggest attractions like, Amsterdam and Keukenhof. Chances are if it's Dutch, and you've heard of it, it's in one of the Hollands. Even the government's travel website for the country is Holland.com -- officially because it sounds friendlier, but unofficially it's probably what people are actually searching for. Confusion continues because: People who live in the Hollands are called Hollanders, but all citizens of the Netherlands are called Dutch as is their language. But in Dutch they say: Nederlands sprekende Nederlanders in Nederland which sounds like they'd rather we call them Netherlanders speaking Netherlandish. Meanwhile, next door in Germany, they're Deutsche sprechen Deutsch in Deutschland. Which sounds like they'd rather be called Dutch. This linguistic confusion is why Americans call the Pennsylvania Dutch Dutch even though they're Germans. To review: this country is the Netherlands, its people are Dutch, they speak Dutch. There is no country called Holland, but there are provinces of North and South Holland. Got it? Great, because it's about to get more complicated. The Netherlands is part of a Kingdom with the same name: The Kingdom of the Netherlands -- which is headed by the Dutch Royal Family. The Kingdom of the Netherlands contains three more countries and to find them we must sail from the icy North Sea to the Caribbean and Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten. These are no territories, but self-governing countries within the Kingdom of the Netherlands and as such they have their own governments, and their own currencies. Geography geek side note here: While Aruba and Curaçao are islands, Sint Maarten is just the Southern Half of a tiny island also named Saint Martin the other half of which is occupied by France and also named Saint Martin. So despite being separated by Belgium on the European map, The Kingdom of the Netherlands and the French Republic share a border on the other side of the world on an island so nice they named it thrice. But why does the Kingdom of the Netherlands reach to the Caribbean anyway? Because, Empire. In the 1600s the Dutch, always looking to expand business, laid their hands on every valuable port they could. For a time, America's East Coast was 'New Netherland' with its capital city of New Amsterdam. There was New Zealand, as mentioned previously, and nearby, the king of the islands, New Holland. Though the empire is gone, these three Caribbean nations remain. And while four countries in one kingdom, isn't unheard of, it doesn't stop there, because the country of the Netherlands, also extends its borders to the Caribbean and three more islands: Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba. These are not countries in a Kingdom, but are cities of the Country of the Netherlands and they look the part. Residents of these far-flung cities vote in elections for the Dutch government just as any Hollander would. Though, weirdly, they don't belong to any province and they don't use the Dutch currency of Euros, they use Dollars instead. It's kind of like if Hawaii wasn't a state, but technically part of the District of Columbia, all the while using the Yen. These cities of the Country of the Netherlands and these countries in the Kingdom of the Netherlands, are together are known as the Dutch Caribbean. And their citizens are Dutch citizens. Which, because the Kingdom of the Netherlands is a member of the European Union, means these Dutch Caribbeans are also Europeans. So in the end, there are 6 Caribbean islands, four countries, twelve provinces, two Hollands, two Netherlands and one kingdom, all Dutch.

Contents

Administration

Holland sign on display at the Museum of Lincolnshire Life with the Latin motto Labor Ipse Merces (Work is its own reward)
Holland sign on display at the Museum of Lincolnshire Life with the Latin motto Labor Ipse Merces (Work is its own reward)

Parts of Holland was one of the three medieval subdivisions or 'Parts' of Lincolnshire (the other two were Lindsey and Kesteven) which had long had separate county administrations (quarter sessions). Under the Local Government Act 1888 it obtained a county council, which it retained until 1974. At that point the three county councils were abolished and Lincolnshire (minus the northern part of Lindsey) had a single county council for the first time.

Before the changes of 1888, Holland had, since probably the tenth century, been divided into the three wapentakes of Elloe, Kirton and Skirbeck.[2]

Under the Local Government Act 1894 it was divided into rural districts and urban districts, with the municipal borough of Boston remaining untouched. The rural districts were Boston, Crowland, East Elloe and Spalding, whilst Holbeach, Long Sutton, Spalding and Sutton Bridge became urban districts. In 1932, the Crowland RD (which consisted of the single parish of Crowland) was abolished and added to Spalding RD, and all urban districts apart from Spalding were abolished and added to East Elloe Rural District.

Geography

The extent of Holland County Council (the pre-1974 county) was the same as that of the combined modern local government districts of Boston and South Holland.

Holland was all close to sea level, achieving a maximum altitude of about five metres (16 feet) on artificially raised river banks (levees). It therefore needed carefully managed drainage to maintain the very productive arable farmland which covered almost its entire extent. Consequently, a significant part of its drainage for arable use had to await the introduction of steam pumping. Before the mid-19th century, it was a much more pastoral area, used for fattening livestock brought in from Scotland and northern England before it was driven to market in places like London. Many of the country roads are still called droves.

Towns in Holland

The motto shown on the coat of arms, Labor Ipse Memores, is incorrect and should read Labor Ipse Merces (work is its own reward).[citation needed] Examples may be seen in the window of the old hall (library) at Boston Grammar School, and on the wall of the dining room at Lincoln Hall, University of Nottingham.

There is a resemblance in landscape between the Parts of Holland and Holland, the region in the Netherlands, although their meanings are different. Holland in England means "land of the hill spurs", although hill spurs are hardly obvious, while the Dutch Holland is derived from the Old Dutch term holt-lant ("wooded land"). Both Hollands have landscapes that are low lying and both are known for tulip growing.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Parts of Holland (former division, England, United Kingdom) – Britannica Online Encyclopedia". britannica.com. 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2012.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel (1848). "Skidbrook - Skutterskelfe | A Topographical Dictionary of England (pp. 115-118)". british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 5 April 2012.
  3. ^ Room, Adrian (1993). Dictionary of Place Names in the British Isles. Bloomsbury. p. 174. ISBN 0-7475-1511-5.

External links

This page was last edited on 26 July 2018, at 07:52
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