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Parkville, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Parkville, Missouri
McKay Hall at Park University
McKay Hall at Park University
Location of Parkville, Missouri
Location of Parkville, Missouri
Parkville-mo-map.gif
Coordinates: 39°11′44″N 94°41′1″W / 39.19556°N 94.68361°W / 39.19556; -94.68361
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyPlatte
Area
 • Total15.41 sq mi (39.91 km2)
 • Land14.79 sq mi (38.30 km2)
 • Water0.62 sq mi (1.62 km2)
Elevation
827 ft (252 m)
Population
 • Total5,554
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
7,162
 • Density484.34/sq mi (187.01/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
64151-64152
Area code(s)816
FIPS code29-56288[4]
GNIS feature ID0730174[5]
Websiteparkvillemo.gov

Parkville is a city in Platte County, Missouri, United States and is a part of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. The population was 5,554 at the 2010 census. Parkville is known for its antique shops, art galleries, and historic downtown. The city is home to Park University, English Landing Park and National Golf Club of Kansas City (this includes the neighborhood - The National) and has a private reservoir with houses around it named Riss Lake.

History

Parkville was platted in 1844.[6] The community has the name of George S. Park, a first settler.[7] A post office called Parkville was established in 1841, and remained in operation until 1962.[8]

The Benjamin Banneker School, Mackay Building, Charles Smith Scott Memorial Observatory, Waddell "A" Truss Bridge, and Washington Chapel C.M.E. Church are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[9]

Geography

Parkville is located at 39°11′44″N 94°41′1″W / 39.19556°N 94.68361°W / 39.19556; -94.68361 (39.195602, -94.683636).[10] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.41 square miles (39.91 km2), of which 14.79 square miles (38.31 km2) is land and 0.62 square miles (1.61 km2) is water.[11]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850309
1880482
189076959.5%
190093121.1%
1910765−17.8%
1920619−19.1%
19306362.7%
19406715.5%
19501,18676.8%
19601,2293.6%
19701,2532.0%
19802,09166.9%
19902,40214.9%
20004,05969.0%
20105,55436.8%
2019 (est.)7,162[3]29.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 5,554 people, 1,974 households, and 1,469 families living in the city. The population density was 375.5 inhabitants per square mile (145.0/km2). There were 2,126 housing units at an average density of 143.7 per square mile (55.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.5% White, 4.0% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.0% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.7% of the population.

There were 1,974 households, of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.6% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 25.6% were non-families. 20.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 39.1 years. 25.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20% were from 25 to 44; 32.6% were from 45 to 64; and 9.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 4,059 people, 1,510 households, and 1,060 families living in the city. The population density was 586.9 people per square mile (226.5/km2). There were 1,587 housing units at an average density of 229.5 per square mile (88.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.37% White, 4.71% African American, 0.52% Native American, 1.31% Asian, 0.96% Pacific Islander, 0.81% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.27% of the population.

There were 1,510 households, out of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.1% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.8% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.4% under the age of 18, 12.4% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 6.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $68,600, and the median income for a family was $86,820. Males had a median income of $64,917 versus $31,740 for females. The per capita income for the city was $33,119. About 5.0% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Park Hill School District operates one school in Parkville: Graden Elementary School.[13]

Park University, a private institution, has been in operation at Parkville since 1875.[14]

Parkville has a public library, a branch of the Mid-Continent Public Library.[15]

Notable people

In popular culture

In Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), Huck, Jim, "the king" and "the duke" crash a religious camp meeting in a town called Parkville, where "the king" lies to the crowd that he is an ex-pirate who was robbed and needs money to return to the Indian Ocean to convert other pirates to Christianity, for which a collection is taken from the crowd. This may actually be a fictitious town in Arkansas called Parkville, which Huck Finn describes as "a little one-horse town about three mile down the bend [of the Mississippi River]".

In the Menagerie trilogy by Tui and Kari Sutherland, there was a menagerie in Parkville that was shut down due to it being exposed to the public.[16]

In Suits Season 2 episode 15, "Normandy", Harvey and Scotty travel to Parkville to depose a woman on a gender discrimination case.

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ "Platte County Place Names, 1928–1945". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  7. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1917). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 342.
  8. ^ "Post Offices". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  9. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 12, 2012. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  13. ^ "Park Hill School District". Great Schools. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  14. ^ Austin Relocation Guide - 2011: Your Guide to Everything Austin. BookBaby. June 20, 2011. p. 119. ISBN 978-1-61792-888-8.
  15. ^ "Locations". Mid-Continent Public Library. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  16. ^ Twain, Mark, "Chapter XX: What Royalty Did to Parkville," in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1948, p. 167-170.

External links

This page was last edited on 15 December 2020, at 23:05
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