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Page County, Virginia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Page County
Page County Courthouse in February 2014
Page County Courthouse in February 2014
Flag of Page County
Official seal of Page County
Official logo of Page County
Map of Virginia highlighting Page County
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°37′N 78°29′W / 38.61°N 78.48°W / 38.61; -78.48
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded1831
Named forJohn Page
SeatLuray
Largest townLuray
Area
 • Total314 sq mi (810 km2)
 • Land311 sq mi (810 km2)
 • Water3.2 sq mi (8 km2)  1.0%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total23,709
 • Density76/sq mi (29/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
22650, 22827, 22835, 22849, 22851
Area code540, 826
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.pagecounty.virginia.gov

Page County is located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 23,709.[1] Its county seat is Luray.[2] Page County was formed in 1831 from Shenandoah and Rockingham counties and was named for John Page, Governor of Virginia from 1802 to 1805.

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Transcription

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 314 square miles (810 km2), of which 311 square miles (810 km2) is land and 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2) (1.0%) is water.[3] The highest point in Page County is Hawksbill Mountain, which is located along the border with Madison County within Shenandoah National Park.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Major highways

US 211 and US 340 run concurrently for several miles in Page County near Luray

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
18406,194
18507,60022.7%
18608,1096.7%
18708,4624.4%
18809,96517.8%
189013,09231.4%
190013,7945.4%
191014,1472.6%
192014,7704.4%
193014,8520.6%
194014,8630.1%
195015,1521.9%
196015,5722.8%
197016,5816.5%
198019,40117.0%
199021,69011.8%
200023,1776.9%
201024,0423.7%
202023,709−1.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790–1960[5] 1900–1990[6]
1990–2000[7] 2010[8] 2020[9]

2020 census

Page County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[8] Pop 2020[9] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 22,871 21,870 95.13% 92.24%
Black or African American alone (NH) 456 436 1.90% 1.84%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 37 49 0.15% 0.21%
Asian alone (NH) 71 115 0.30% 0.49%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 7 8 0.03% 0.03%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 6 40 0.02% 0.17%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 221 694 0.92% 2.93%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 373 497 1.55% 2.10%
Total 24,042 23,709 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 23,177 people, 9,305 households, and 6,634 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 people per square mile (29 people/km2). There were 10,557 housing units at an average density of 34 units per square mile (13 units/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.65% White, 2.61% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,305 households, out of which 29.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.80% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.00% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 28.30% from 25 to 44, 25.30% from 45 to 64, and 15.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 96.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,359, and the median income for a family was $39,005. Males had a median income of $27,199 versus $19,821 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,321. About 10.10% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.00% of those under age 18 and 14.70% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

Education

K-12

Page County has a total of 8 public schools: 4 elementary schools, 2 middle schools and 2 high schools.[11]

High Schools Middle Schools Elementary Schools
Luray Luray Luray
Springfield
Page County Page County Shenandoah
Stanley

In addition to the public schools, Page County has a Technical Center with programs in:

  • Automotive Technology
  • Cosmetology
  • Electricity
  • Welding
  • Health Sciences[12]

Higher Education

Laurel Ridge Community College's Luray-Page County Center is located in Luray, which provides college and workforce development classes. Jenkins Hall features more than 13,000 square feet of educational space, including classrooms, science and health labs, a trades lab, student commons, and administrative offices.

The college in Luray is a satellite site for a physical therapy assistant degree program, plus phlebotomy, medical office assistant, HVAC, and heavy equipment operator classes.[13]

Students can earn an Associate Degree in many different subjects, or can take general education classes to transfer into a four-year university.

Politics

Since 1940, Page County has been a stronghold for the Republican Party in presidential elections.

The Page County Board of Supervisors has six members, one from each voting district and one at-large chairman.

County Board of Supervisors
Name Party District
  Keith Weakley, Chairman Rep At-Large
  D. Keith Guzy, Jr. Rep District 1 - West Luray
  Allen Louderback Rep District 2 - East Luray
  Mark Stroupe Rep District 3 - Marksville
  Larry Foltz Rep District 4 - Newport
  Jeff Vaughan Rep District 5 - Shenandoah
United States presidential election results for Page County, Virginia[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,345 74.68% 3,007 24.03% 162 1.29%
2016 7,831 72.91% 2,514 23.41% 395 3.68%
2012 6,344 62.03% 3,724 36.41% 160 1.56%
2008 6,041 58.15% 4,235 40.76% 113 1.09%
2004 6,221 64.78% 3,324 34.61% 58 0.60%
2000 5,089 63.64% 2,726 34.09% 181 2.26%
1996 3,876 51.83% 2,868 38.35% 735 9.83%
1992 4,203 49.68% 3,010 35.58% 1,247 14.74%
1988 5,013 66.18% 2,499 32.99% 63 0.83%
1984 5,021 66.78% 2,437 32.41% 61 0.81%
1980 4,297 60.20% 2,607 36.52% 234 3.28%
1976 3,780 51.52% 3,401 46.35% 156 2.13%
1972 4,326 72.34% 1,585 26.51% 69 1.15%
1968 3,667 53.93% 2,125 31.25% 1,008 14.82%
1964 2,804 51.74% 2,606 48.09% 9 0.17%
1960 2,708 62.53% 1,608 37.13% 15 0.35%
1956 2,372 62.73% 1,358 35.92% 51 1.35%
1952 2,649 64.59% 1,441 35.14% 11 0.27%
1948 2,236 55.14% 1,611 39.73% 208 5.13%
1944 2,574 60.79% 1,653 39.04% 7 0.17%
1940 1,630 50.36% 1,596 49.30% 11 0.34%
1936 1,551 45.00% 1,888 54.77% 8 0.23%
1932 1,261 39.93% 1,851 58.61% 46 1.46%
1928 1,580 60.65% 1,025 39.35% 0 0.00%
1924 885 43.02% 1,015 49.34% 157 7.63%
1920 1,126 56.81% 846 42.68% 10 0.50%
1916 613 41.50% 842 57.01% 22 1.49%
1912 340 27.94% 703 57.76% 174 14.30%

Notable people

  • Arthur William Aleshire (February 15, 1900 – March 11, 1940) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.
  • Edward Mallory "Ned" Almond (December 12, 1892 – June 11, 1979) was a controversial United States Army general best known as the commander of the Army's X Corps during the Korean War.
  • Floyd Wilson Baker (October 10, 1916 – November 17, 2004) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the St. Louis Browns (1943–1944), Chicago White Sox (1945–1951), Washington Senators, (1952–1953), Boston Red Sox (1953–1954) and Philadelphia Phillies (1954–1955).
  • William Randolph Barbee (January 17, 1818 – June 16, 1868) was an American sculptor recognized for creating idealized, sentimental classical figures.
  • Herbert Barbee (October 8, 1848 – March 22, 1936) was an American sculptor.
  • Peter Bouck Borst (June 23, 1826 – April 24, 1882) was an active participant in the mid-19th century development of Page County, Virginia, serving as a lawyer, county delegate to Virginia's Secession Convention of 1861, and president of the Shenandoah Valley Railroad.
  • Patrick Henry Brittan (September 21, 1815 – March 18, 1868) was quartermaster general of Alabama (1857–59) and 10th Secretary of State for Alabama (1860–65).
  • Wayne Comer (born February 3, 1944) is a former Major League Baseball player.
  • Charles Frederick Crisp (January 29, 1845 – October 23, 1896) was a United States political figure. A Democrat, he was elected as a Congressman from Georgia in 1882, and served until his death in 1896. From 1890 until his death, he was leader of the Democratic Party in the House, as either the House Minority Leader or the Speaker of the House. He was also the father of Charles R. Crisp who also served in Congress.
  • William Alexander Harris Sr. (August 24, 1805 – March 28, 1864) was a U.S. Representative from Virginia, father of William A. Harris.
  • William Alexander Harris (October 29, 1841 – December 20, 1909) was a United States Representative and Senator from Kansas.
  • Benjamin Franklin Huffman (July 18, 1914 – February 22, 2005) was a catcher in Major League Baseball.
  • Thomas Jordan (September 30, 1819 – November 27, 1895) was a Confederate general and major operative in the network of Confederate spies during the American Civil War. A West Point graduate and career soldier in the armies of three nations, he fought in numerous wars and rebellions in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. Jordan was also a newspaper editor and author.
  • Donald Edward Keyhoe (June 20, 1897 – November 29, 1988) was an American Marine Corps naval aviator, writer of many aviation articles and stories in a variety of leading publications, and manager of the promotional tours of aviation pioneers, especially of Charles Lindbergh.
  • Robert Franklin Leedy (July 28, 1863 – January 12, 1924) was a lawyer, soldier, and Virginia state legislator.
  • William Milnes Jr. (December 8, 1827 – August 14, 1889) was a nineteenth-century congressman and industrialist from Virginia and Pennsylvania.
  • Kenneth R. Plum (November 3, 1941 – ) is a member of the Virginia House of Delegates.
  • George Quaintance (June 3, 1902 – November 8, 1957) was an artist from Page County, Virginia.
  • Henry Ruffner (January 16, 1790 – December 17, 1861) was an educator and Presbyterian minister, who served as president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University).
  • Bethany Veney (c. 1813 – November 16, 1916), also known as Aunt Betty, was an black American slave. Her autobiography was published 1889.
  • William Overall Yager (April 3, 1833 – 1904) was, during the American Civil War, the commanding officer of the 1st Texas Cavalry, and, in postwar years, member of the Virginia House of Delegates and the Senate of Virginia, Superintendent of Schools, and Treasurer for Page County, Virginia.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Page County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  4. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  8. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Page County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  9. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Page County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. ^ "Page County Public Schools". www.pagecounty.k12.va.us. Retrieved September 22, 2022.
  12. ^ "Page County Technical Center". www.pagecounty.k12.va.us. Retrieved September 22, 2022.
  13. ^ "Laurel Ridge celebrates grand opening of Jenkins Hall in Luray ‣ Laurel Ridge Community College". laurelridge.edu. September 15, 2021. Retrieved January 21, 2023.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 8, 2020.

External links

38°37′N 78°29′W / 38.61°N 78.48°W / 38.61; -78.48

This page was last edited on 14 January 2024, at 15:47
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