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Pabellón Príncipe Felipe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pabellón Príncipe Felipe
Pabellon Principe Felipe 2015.JPG
Full name Pabellón Príncipe Felipe
Former names Pabellón José Luis Abós (2015)
Location Zaragoza, Spain
Owner Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza
Capacity 10,744
Opened 1990
Tenants
CAI Zaragoza (2002–present)
BM Aragón
CDB Zaragoza (until 2007)
CB Zaragoza (until 1996)

Pabellón Príncipe Felipe is an arena in Zaragoza, Spain. The arena holds 10,744 people.

It is primarily used for basketball (home of CAI Zaragoza) and handball (home of Caja3 Aragón).[1]

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Transcription

Events hosted

The arena hosted the 1990 and 1995 Euroleague Final Fours, as well as the 1999 Saporta Cup Final in which Benneton Treviso defeated Pamesa Valencia.[2]

The arena frequently hosts rock bands, such as David Bowie, Oasis and Depeche Mode.

Controversy about naming

On July 24, 2015, the Zaragoza City Hall changed the name of Pabellón Príncipe Felipe to Pabellón José Luis Abós,[3] in honor of the beloved coach of CAI Zaragoza, who died in October 2014.[4]

As a result of a controversy about changing the name of the pavilion, approved without majority in the voting in the City Hall,[5] CAI Zaragoza did not support the change.[6]

Finally, the process of changing the name was stopped judicially.[7]

References

Preceded by
Olympiahalle
Munich
FIBA European Champions Cup
Final Four
Venue

1990
Succeeded by
Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy
Paris
Preceded by
Yad Eliyahu Sports Hall
Tel Aviv
FIBA European Champions Cup
Final Four
Venue

1995
Succeeded by
Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy
Paris
Preceded by
Pionir Hall
Belgrade
Saporta Cup
Final Venue

1999
Succeeded by
CIG de Malley
Lausanne

This page was last edited on 21 March 2018, at 23:26.
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