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Our Time (1974 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Our Time
Our Time FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed byPeter Hyams
Produced byRichard A. Roth
Written byJane C. Stanton
StarringPamela Sue Martin
Parker Stevenson
Betsy Slade
George O'Hanlon, Jr.
Music byMichel Legrand
CinematographyJules Brenner
Edited byJames Mitchell
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
  • April 10, 1974 (1974-04-10)
Running time
90 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Our Time (also known as Death of Her Innocence) is a 1974 American drama film directed by Peter Hyams. The film was written by Jane C. Stanton, and stars Pamela Sue Martin, Parker Stevenson and Betsy Slade. The story is set at a Massachusetts school for girls in the 1950s. Though not a hit, it was liked as a study of a boy-girl relationship.

Plot

Penfield was a girls school in 1955. The curriculum ranged from Latin to Etiquette, from Shakespeare to Field Hockey. Abigail is one of the new girls coming in to learn about these and other subjects. Coming from a well to do family, she hopes to be the school's best student. Just as she is getting started in the school, she meets Michael, a male student in the school. Soon the two fall deeply in love, but their relationship becomes challenged by those around them, leading to difficulties and tragedy.

Cast

Production

Peter Hyams had previously made Busting, an R-rated movie about vice cops which had not performed well commercially. With Our Time, "I was trying to do the opposite of what I had done before," he says.[1] Upon viewing the film, critics took note of the bad cinematography, particularly the repeated instances of seeing sound and lighting equipment in many shots.

Reception

Vincent Canby of The New York Times wrote that the film "combines the worst features of two kinds of ancient Broadway comedy with a gothic lack of sensibility all its own," and found it "difficult to believe" that Peter Hyams "was also the director of the recent 'Busting,' one of the better, more intelligent cop movies. Perhaps teen-age rich girls are not characters with whom he has much sympathy or understanding."[2] Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune gave the film 1 star out of 4 and wrote that it "probably sees itself as the female equivalent of 'Summer of '42' ... Unfortunately, the story this time is nothing more than a B-grade soap opera."[3] Arthur D. Murphy of Variety called it "an unexciting, sterile story ... More of a made-for-TV feature than anything else."[4] Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times was positive, stating that the film "turns nostalgia back on itself with remarkable deftness and subtlety. In doing so it makes certain aspects of the '70s seem not all that bad." He added that "All four of the film's young stars are able and appealing."[5] Tom Shales of The Washington Post wrote that "Muffy has no redeeming values; she's loathsome and self-pitying. So who are we supposed to care about, much less root for?"[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ Interview with Peter Hyams by Luke Ford accessed 27 July 2014
  2. ^ Canby, Vincent (April 11, 1974). "The Screen: 'Our Time'". The New York Times. 31.
  3. ^ Siskel, Gene (August 5, 1974). "Buster and Billie". Chicago Tribune. Section 2, p. 15.
  4. ^ Murphy, Arthur D. (April 3, 1974). "Film Reviews: Our Time". Variety. 24.
  5. ^ Thomas, Kevin (April 26, 1974). "Nostalgia With a Bite". Los Angeles Times. Part IV, p. 1, 27.
  6. ^ Shales, Tom (July 18, 1974). "The Pretty and the Pitiful". The Washington Post. B13.

External links

This page was last edited on 18 August 2019, at 16:45
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