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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 {
\clef "treble_8"
\time 3/4 \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"acoustic guitar (steel)"
<d, g, d g b d'>2.
<d, >4
<g, >4
<d >4
<g >4
<b >4
<d' >4
<d, g, d g b d'>2.
}

Among alternative tunings for the guitar, an open G tuning is an open tuning that features the G-major chord; its open notes are selected from the notes of a G-major chord, such as the G-major triad (G,B,D). For example, a popular open-G tuning is

D–G–D–G–B–D (low to high).

An open-G tuning allows a G-major chord to be strummed on all six strings with neither fretting of the left hand nor a capo. Like other open tunings, it allows the eleven major chords besides G major each to be strummed by barring at most one finger on exactly one fret.[1] Open tunings are common in blues and folk music,[2] and they are used in the playing of slide and bottleneck guitars.[1][3]

Mark Knopfler, of Dire Straits, used the open G tuning on "Walkin' In The Wild West End" and "Romeo and Juliet", though, in both songs, the open chord was the IV (subdominant,) chord, not the home (tonic) chord of the song. On "Romeo and Juliet", a capo was placed on the third fret.[citation needed]

A seven-string guitar with the open-strings annotated with the notes.
The seven-string Russian guitar uses the open-G tuning D–G–B–D–G–B–D.

Repetitive open-G tunings are used by Russian guitars, Dobro guitars, and banjos. They repeat three open-string notes.

The repetitive open-G tuning

D–G–B–D–G–B–D
 {
\clef "treble_8"
\time 3/4 \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"acoustic guitar (steel)"
<d, g, b, d g b d'>2.
<d, >4
<g, >4
<b, >4
<d >4
<g >4
<b >4
<d' >4
<d, g, b, d g b d'>2.
}

is used by the Russian guitar, which has seven strings tuned mostly in triads, in contrast to other guitars, which are tuned mostly in fourths.[4][5][6]

Dobros use a full six-string tuning with a bottom G: G–B–D–G–B–D, low to high. The two lowest strings are, accordingly, tuned three semitones higher for the lowest string (from E up to G) and two semitones higher for the second-lowest string (from A up to B) while the highest string is tuned two semitones lower (from E down to D), relative to standard tuning.

Five-string banjo's standard tuning is also an Open G: g–D–G–B–D, where the lower case "g" denotes the highest-pitched "drone string", physically located next to (above) the lowest-pitched string, the first upper case "D".[7]

Overtones of the fundamental note G

Randy Jackson plays guitar
Zebra's Randy Jackson played "Who's Behind the Door?" using the same open-G overtones-tuning.
Joni Mitchell plays guitar in 1974
Joni Mitchell used the open-G overtones-tuning G–G–D–G–B–D for "Electricity", "For the Roses", and "Hunter (The Good Samaritan)".
The Rolling Stones's Keith Richards plays a five-string 1953 Telecaster in open-G tuning.
The Rolling Stones's Keith Richards plays a five-string 1953 Telecaster in open-G tuning.

Bad Company guitarist Mick Ralphs has used another open-G tuning, which listed the initial six overtones of the G note,

G–G–D–G–B–D
 {
\clef "treble_8"
\time 3/4 \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"acoustic guitar (steel)"
<g,, g, d g b d'>2.
<g,, >4
<g, >4
<d >4
<g >4
<b >4
<d' >4
<g,, g, d g b d'>2.
}
for "Hey Hey" and while writing the demo of "Can't Get Enough".[8]

The overtones tuning G–G–D–G–B–D was used by Joni Mitchell for "Electricity", "For the Roses", and "Hunter (The Good Samaritan)".[9] Truncating this tuning to G-D-G-B-D for his five-string guitar, Keith Richards plays this overtones-tuning on The Rolling Stones' "Honky Tonk Women", "Brown Sugar" and "Start Me Up".[10] American rock band Eagles of Death Metal, uses this tuning for the majority of their songs.[11]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Sethares (n.d., p. 16)
  2. ^ Denyer (1992, p. 158)
  3. ^ Denyer (1992, p. 160)
  4. ^ Bellow (1970, p. 164): Bellow, Alexander (1970). The illustrated history of the guitar. Colombo Publications.
  5. ^ Timofeyev, Oleg V. (1999). The Golden Age of the Russian Guitar: Repertoire, performance practice, and social function of the Russian seven-string guitar music, 1800–1850. Duke University, Department of Music. pp. 1–584. University Microfilms (UMI), Ann Arbor, Michigan, number 9928880.[page range too broad]
  6. ^ Ophee, Matanya (ed.). 19th Century etudes for the Russian 7-string guitar in G Op. The Russian Collection. 9. Editions Orphee. PR.494028230.; Ophee, Matanya (ed.). Selected Concert Works for the Russian 7-String Guitar in G open tuning. The Russian Collection. 10 ("X"). Editions Orphee. PR.494028240.
  7. ^ http://opendtuning.com/open-g-tuning-dgdgbd/
  8. ^ Sharken, Lisa (15 May 2001). "Mick Ralphs: The rock 'N' roll fantasy continues". Vintage Guitar. Retrieved 21 February 2013.
  9. ^ "List of all Guitar and Piano Transcriptions". GGDGBD. JoniMitchell.com. Retrieved February 22, 2013.
  10. ^ Ellis, Andy (2005). "How to play like ... Keith Richards". Guitar Player. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  11. ^ "Eagles of Death Metal's Jesse Hughes: Special Forces Ringmaster". Premier Guitar. 22 October 2015. Retrieved March 9, 2020.

References

  • Denyer, Ralph (1992). "Playing the guitar ('How the guitar is tuned', pp. 68–69, and 'Alternative tunings', pp. 158–159)". The Guitar Handbook. Special contributors Isaac Guillory and Alastair M. Crawford (Fully revised and updated ed.). London and Sydney: Pan Books. pp. 65–160. ISBN 0-330-32750-X.
  • Sethares, William A. (n.d.). "Alternate tuning guide". Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin; Department of Electrical Engineering. Retrieved 19 May 2012. PDF

Further reading

This page was last edited on 26 October 2021, at 05:08
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