To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Open, closed, open

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Open, closed, open is a technique of playing snare drum rudiments, especially used during auditions or classical practice routines.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    2 756 508
    61 880
    41 444
  • ✪ Open, Close! | Open Shut Them Song
  • ✪ Open, CLosed & Isolated Systems
  • ✪ Design Patterns: Open Closed Principle Explained Practically in C# (The O in SOLID)

Transcription

Show me your hands. Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your eyes. Eyes Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your ears. Ears Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your nose. Nose Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your arms. Arms Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your knees. Knees Open close. Open close. Everybody clap, clap, clap. Open close. Open close. Everybody touch your head. Good job!

Technique

"Open, closed, open," also referred to as "open to close to open," or "slow, fast, slow,"[1] consists of beginning a drum rudiment very slow and controlled, speeding up evenly until at the maximum speed for the drummer, then slowing back down after maintaining that speed. Optimally, the drummer should end on the opposite hand as started, in case of alternating rudiments such as paradiddles. The speed at which the exercise ends should be the same speed as the exercise began. The time taken to accelerate to maximum speed should be equal to the time taken to decelerate to the beginning speed so that the exercise is symmetrical.[2] The exercise should last one to two minutes with each individual rudiment, depending on the skill and stamina of the player, so that 30 seconds to one minute consists of acceleration and then a corresponding 30 seconds to one minute consists of deceleration.[3]

It is recommended that once a rudiment is learned, as far as the technical sticking and accents, that it be practiced regularly with the open, closed, open technique as well as at a moderate march tempo to ensure that a drummer or percussionist is able to play the rudiment accurately at any speed necessary for performance of musical repertoire.[4]

The most difficult rudiments to play in this manner are those with continuous patterns (no breaks or rests) such as the single stroke roll, double stroke roll, and triple stroke roll, due to the requirement for the sound to stay smooth and even while the technique used for playing the strokes changes with speed.[5]


References

  1. ^ https://www.pas.org/resources/rudiments
  2. ^ Knudtson, Gordy. Morphing Double Stroke Rolls with the Open/Close Technique.
  3. ^ Campbell, James. Solo Expressions for the Beginning Percussionist. Alfred, 2007.
  4. ^ Wanamaker, Jay. Drum Rudiment Dictionary: A Complete Reference Guide Containing the Percussive Arts Society's 40 International Drum Rudiments. Alfred, 2005.
  5. ^ Chandler, Eric Alan, "A History of Rudimental Drumming in America From the Revolutionary War to the Present." (1990). LSU Historical Dissertations and Theses. 4901
This page was last edited on 23 September 2019, at 16:04
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.