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Oklahoma State Cowboys baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oklahoma State Cowboys
2021 Oklahoma State Cowboys baseball team
Oklahoma State University system logo.svg
Founded1909 (1909)
UniversityOklahoma State University
Head coachJosh Holliday (10th season)
ConferenceBig 12
LocationStillwater, Oklahoma
Home stadiumO'Brate Stadium
(Capacity: 3,500)
NicknameCowboys
ColorsOrange and black[1]
         
NCAA Tournament champions
1959
College World Series runner-up
1961, 1966, 1981, 1987, 1990
College World Series appearances
1954, 1955, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2016
NCAA Tournament appearances
1948, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Conference tournament champions
Missouri Valley
1947, 1948, 1949, 1954, 1955

Big Eight
1978, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996


Big 12
2004, 2017, 2019
Conference champions
Missouri Valley
1948, 1949, 1955

Big Eight
1959, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994


Big 12
2014

Oklahoma State Cowboys baseball is the NCAA Division I varsity intercollegiate baseball team of Oklahoma State University, based in Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States. The team competes in the Big 12 Conference. The Cowboys' current head coach is Josh Holliday.

Oklahoma State is a historically elite program, with the fifth-best win percentage, 14th-most wins, sixth-most College World Series wins, sixth-most College World Series appearances, and fourth-most NCAA Tournament appearances in college baseball history, as of June 14, 2021.[2] The program has accumulated a better all-time win percentage and more wins, regular season conference championships, conference tournament championships, All-Americans, NCAA Tournament appearances, NCAA Tournament wins, College World Series appearances, College World Series Finals appearances, College World Series wins, and College Baseball Hall of Famers than any school in the Big 12 besides Texas. Oklahoma State has won 24 conference championships and 25 conference tournament championships as of the end of the 2021 season. The Cowboys have also earned 46 NCAA Tournament bids and have played in 20 College World Series, including a still-standing NCAA record seven straight CWS appearances from 1981 to 1987.

The Cowboys have four players/coaches in the College Baseball Hall of Fame: Gary Ward (who coached the program to 16 consecutive conference titles from 1980 to 1996), Tom Borland (1955 College World Series Most Outstanding Player), Pete Incaviglia (the all time home run king in college baseball history), and Robin Ventura (holder of an NCAA record 58-game hitting streak and widely regarded as the greatest hitter in college baseball history).

Oklahoma State won the national championship in 1959, led by star pitcher Joel Horlen, who would later author the 12th no-hitter in Chicago White Sox history in 1967.[3] Former OSU pitcher Allie Reynolds also threw two no-hitters with the New York Yankees in 1951, which is still tied as an MLB record for most no-hitters in a single season by one player. Former Cowboy pitcher John Farrell managed the Boston Red Sox to two World Series championships in 2007 and 2013.

History

1959 national championship

The 1959 Cowboys baseball team entered the season not expected to do much. Only four players, left fielder Don Soergel, and pitchers Roy Peterson, Joel Horlen, and Dick Soergel, were on the roster from the previous season. The preseason prospectus for 1959 read, "The baseball outlook for coach Toby Greene's 16th edition of Cowboy baseball is quite questionable. Despite the return of key members from last year's pitching staff, it's hard to consider the Pokes much of a threat with graduation, grades and the pros robbing the veteran OSU mentor of all but one of his starters." The team compiled a 17–3 conference record, winning the Big Eight conference title.

OSU opened the 1959 national tournament with a 10–2 victory over Western Michigan behind a Joel Horlen five-hitter. They had to rally for three runs in the seventh in its next game against Penn State and won 8–6 with eleven team hits. In their next game, the Cowboys lost to Arizona by a score of 5–3, as Soergel lost his first career game in twelve decisions. In the losers bracket, the Pokes found themselves down 3–2 in the ninth, but scraped across two runs to earn the 4–3 victory. A Fresno State victory over Arizona that night left three teams with one loss each. Arizona won the coin toss and became the odd man out as Oklahoma State and Fresno State met for the chance to play the Wildcats for the national championship. The Cowboys beat the Bulldogs 4–0 to advance to the championship game.

In the championship game, Jim Dobson, who was voted the Most Valuable Player, opened the O-State scoring with a towering home run over the left-field fence in the fourth inning. Arizona picked up single runs in the fourth and fifth and led 2–1. Bancroft tied the score with a solo home run in the top of the sixth, but the Wildcats added a run of their own in the bottom of the sixth to lead 3–2. It was another sophomore, Bruce Andrew, who sparked the game-winning three-run rally in the top of the seventh, and OSU led 5–3. Soergel shut out the Wildcats in the final three innings and OSU had its first NCAA Baseball Championship.

Four Cowboy players were named to the College World Series All-Tournament team, including third baseman and MVP Dobson. Also selected were Bruce Andrew at second base, Connie McIlvoy in the outfield and Horlen at pitcher. [4]

Head coaches

Tenure Coach Year(s) Record Pct.
1909–1915 Paul J. Davis 7 54–40–1 .573
1916 Art Griffith 1 5–9 .357
1917–1918 Earl A. Pritchard 2 3–13 .188
1919 Randle Perdue 1 3–11 .214
1920–1921 Hoot Sackett 2 14–19 .424
1922–1929 John Maulbetsch 8 61–59 .508
1930 George E. Rody 1 9–3 .750
1932–1933 Albert Exendine 2 19–13 .594
1934–1941 Henry Iba 8 90–41 .687
1942–1943, 1946–1964 Toby Greene 21 318–132 .707
1965–1977 Chet Bryan 13 247–198–2 .555
1978–1996 Gary Ward 19 953–313–1 .752
1997–2003 Tom Holliday 7 281–150 .652
2004–2012 Frank Anderson 9 329–208 .613
2013–present Josh Holliday 9 351–200–2 .637
Totals 15 coaches 110 2,737–1,409–5 .660

Conference affiliations

  • Independent (1901–1914, 1956–1960)
  • Southwest Conference (1914–1924)
  • MVIAA (1924–1927)
  • Missouri Valley Conference (1927–1956)
  • Big Eight Conference (1960–1996)
  • Big 12 Conference (1996–present)

Facilities

The Cowboys planned to open the new O'Brate Stadium, located one block northwest of the team's current home of Allie P. Reynolds Stadium, on March 20, 2020 for the Cowboys' Big 12 opener against TCU. The Cowboys played their first 11 of a planned 14 home games of the 2020 season at Reynolds Stadium. Named for major donor Cecil O'Brate, the new ballpark has a permanent capacity of 3,500 but is expandable to 8,000.[5]

Reynolds Stadium is named after the former OSU player Allie Reynolds, who went on to play professionally for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees. The park, with a capacity of 3,821, opened in 1981 at a cost of $2.2 million.

Year-by-year results

Year Head Coach Overall Winning % Conference Winning % Conf. Rank Nat. Rank Notes
1909 P.J. Davis 5–5 .500
1910 P.J. Davis 7–5 .583
1911 P.J. Davis 8–2 .800
1912 P.J. Davis 10–5–1 .656
1913 P.J. Davis 9–4 .692
1914 P.J. Davis 10–7 .588
1915 P.J. Davis 5–12 .294
1916 Art Griffith 5–9 .357
1917 E.A Pritchard 2–6 .250
1918 E.A Pritchard 1–7 .125
1919 Randle Perdue 3–11 .214
1920 Hoot Sackett 9–7 .653
1921 Hoot Sackett 5–12 .294
1922 John Maulbetsch 8–7 .533
1923 John Maulbetsch 8–6 .571
1924 John Maulbetsch 10–8 .556
1925 John Maulbetsch 6–8 .429
1926 John Maulbetsch 6–9 .400
1927 John Maulbetsch 6–10 .375
1928 John Maulbetsch 12–4 .750
1929 John Maulbetsch 5–7 .417
1930 George E. Rody 9–3 .750
1931 No Team
1932 Albert Exendine 6–10 .375
1933 Albert Exendine 13–3 .813
1934 Henry Iba 11–4 .733
1935 Henry Iba 8–8 .500
1936 Henry Iba 13–7 .650
1937 Henry Iba 13–4 .765
1938 Henry Iba 13–4 .765
1939 Henry Iba 11–7 .611
1940 Henry Iba 13–5 .722
1941 Henry Iba 8–2 .800
1942 Toby Greene 6–5 .545
1943 Toby Greene 4–3 .571
1944 No Team (WWII)
1945 No Team (WWII)
1946 Toby Greene 15–2 .882
1947 Toby Greene 11–5 .688 11–5 .688 1st
1948 Toby Greene 20–6 .769 20–6 .769 1st District V Champions
Western Playoff
1949 Toby Greene 22–6 .846 5–0 1.000 1st MVC Tournament Champions
District V Champions
Region C Playoff
1950 Toby Greene 15–7 .682 6–3 .667 2nd
1951 Toby Greene 9–8 .529 2–4 .333 5th
1952 Toby Greene 15–5 .750 5–2 .714 2nd
1953 Toby Greene 13–4 .765 4–2 .667 T-2nd
1954 Toby Greene 18–11 .621 8–1 .889 1st District 6 Champions
College World Series
1955 Toby Greene 27–3 .900 8–0 1.000 1st District 5 Champions
College World Series
1956 Toby Greene 11–10 .524 7–2 .778 2nd
1957 Toby Greene 12–3 .800 7–2 .778 2nd
1958 Toby Greene 17–6 .739 13–5 .722 2nd
1959 Toby Greene 27–5 .844 17–3 .850 1st 2 District 5 Champions
College World Series

National Champions
1960 Toby Greene 17–7 .708 12–4 .750 1st 2 District 5 Champions
College World Series
1961 Toby Greene 27–3 .900 18–1 .947 1st 2 District 5 Champions
College World Series Runners-Up
1962 Toby Greene 11–9 .550 10–6 .625 2nd
1963 Toby Greene 15–10 .600 12–9 .571 5th
1964 Toby Greene 6–14 .300 4–12 .538 7th
1965 Chet Bryan 14–11 .560 12–9 .571 3rd
1966 Chet Bryan 21–11 .656 13–7 .650 1st 10 District 5 Champions
College World Series Runners-Up
1967 Chet Bryan 15–10 .600 12–3 .800 1st 12 District 5 Champions
College World Series
1968 Chet Bryan 21–9 .700 15–3 .833 1st 3 District 5 Champions
College World Series
1969 Chet Bryan 20–9 .690 17–3 .850 1st 12
1970 Chet Bryan 11–17 .393 5–11 .313 8th
1971 Chet Bryan 14–19 .424 8–13 .381 6th
1972 Chet Bryan 15–17–1 .470 10–10 .500 4th
1973 Chet Bryan 30–6 .833 15–5 .750 2nd 13
1974 Chet Bryan 24–17 .585 9–12 .429 5th
1975 Chet Bryan 22–18 .550 10–10 .500 4th
1976 Chet Bryan 24–26–1 .480 1–2 .333 T-5th
1977 Chet Bryan 16–28 .364 3–7 .300 6th
1978 Gary Ward 40–22 .645 7–5 .583 1st 20 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional
1979 Gary Ward 33–19 .635 12–8 .600 T-3rd
1980 Gary Ward 43–10 .811 17–3 .850 1st 16
1981 Gary Ward 52–17 .754 12–6 .667 1st 3 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series Runners-Up
1982 Gary Ward 57–16 .781 19–5 .792 1st 4 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1983 Gary Ward 48–16 .750 11–3 .786 1st 3 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1984 Gary Ward 61–15 .803 15–3 .833 1st 3 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1985 Gary Ward 58–16–1 .780 19–4 .826 1st 5 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1986 Gary Ward 56–15 .789 18–5 .783 1st 4 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1987 Gary Ward 59–13 .819 15–6 .714 1st 4 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Mideast Regional Champions
College World Series Runners-Up
1988 Gary Ward 61–8 .884 21–3 .875 1st 9 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional
1989 Gary Ward 48–19 .716 18–6 .750 1st 15 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional
1990 Gary Ward 56–17 .767 18–6 .750 1st 2 Big Eight Tournament Champions
West II Regional Champions
College World Series Runners-Up
1991 Gary Ward 47–20 .701 17–7 .708 1st 9 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Central Regional
1992 Gary Ward 49–16 .754 17–7 .708 1st 13 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional
1993 Gary Ward 45–17 .726 16–8 .667 1st 4 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest Regional Champions
College World Series
1994 Gary Ward 49–17 .742 21–6 .778 1st 12 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Midwest I Regional
1995 Gary Ward 46–19 .708 18–10 .643 1st 11 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Mideast Regional
1996 Gary Ward 45–21 .682 17–9 .654 2nd 8 Big Eight Tournament Champions
Central II Regional Champions
College World Series
1997 Tom Holliday 46–19 .708 22–9 .710 3rd 12
1998 Tom Holliday 40–21 .656 14–12 .538 6th Midwest Regional
1999 Tom Holliday 46–21 .687 18–9 .667 4th 8 Wichita Regional Champions
Waco Super Regional Champions
College World Series
2000 Tom Holliday 36–22 .621 14–13 .519 6th
2001 Tom Holliday 42–22 .656 16–14 .533 5th New Orleans Regional
2002 Tom Holliday 37–21 .638 13–13 .500 T-5th
2003 Tom Holliday 34–24 .586 14–13 .519 6th
2004 Frank Anderson 38–24 .613 15–11 .577 4th Big 12 Tournament Champions
Tallahassee Regional
2005 Frank Anderson 34–25 .576 12–15 .444 6th
2006 Frank Anderson 41–20 .672 18–9 .667 2nd 23 Fayetteville Regional
2007 Frank Anderson 42–21 .667 16–11 .593 3rd 21 Fayetteville Regional Champions
Louisville Super Regional
2008 Frank Anderson 44–18 .710 18–9 .667 2nd 18 Stillwater Regional
2009 Frank Anderson 34–24 .586 9–16 .360 9th Clemson Regional
2010 Frank Anderson 29–26 .527 8–19 .296 10th
2011 Frank Anderson 35–25 .583 14–12 .538 4th Nashville Regional
2012 Frank Anderson 32–25 .561 13–11 .542 5th
2013 Josh Holliday 41–19 .683 13–10 .565 2nd 21 Louisville Regional
2014 Josh Holliday 48–18 .727 18–6 .750 1st 10 Big 12 Regular Season Champions
Stillwater Regional Champions
Stillwater Super Regional
2015 Josh Holliday 38–20 .655 14–8 .636 2nd 18 Stillwater Regional
2016 Josh Holliday 43–22 .662 16–8 .667 2nd 4 Clemson Regional Champions
Columbia Super Regional Champions
College World Series
2017 Josh Holliday 30–27 .526 8–13 .381 8th Big 12 Tournament Champions
Fayetteville Regional
2018 Josh Holliday 31–26–1 .543 16–8 .667 2nd DeLand Regional
2019 Josh Holliday 40–21 .656 14–9 .609 3rd 11 Big 12 Tournament Champions
Oklahoma City Regional Champions
Lubbock Super Regional
2020 Josh Holliday 13-5 .722 0-0 - - Remainder of season canceled due to COVID-19 pandemic
2021 Josh Holliday 35-17-1 .673 12-12 .500 2nd - Tucson Regional

Rivalries

Oklahoma Sooners

Oklahoma State's series against Bedlam rival Oklahoma has featured more games played than any other OSU baseball series.[6] As of the end of the 2021 season, the Cowboys lead the overall series with the Sooners 179–155[6] and hold a 56–40 lead in games played since the inception of the Big 12.[7] Oklahoma State has dominated the rivalry in recent years, winning 23 of 30 contests since 2013, head coach Josh Holliday's first season.[7]

Former Cowboy Major Leaguers

Athlete Years in MLB MLB Teams
Jerry Adair 1958–70 Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox, Kansas City Royals
Jon Adkins 2003–08 Chicago White Sox, San Diego Padres, New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds
Scott Baker 2005–11, 2013–15 Minnesota Twins, Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers, Los Angeles Dodgers
Jim Beauchamp 1963–65, 1967–73 St Louis Cardinals, Houston Colt .45s/Astros, Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, Cincinnati Reds, New York Mets
Josh Billings 1913–23 Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns
Joe Bisenius 2007, 2010 Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Nationals
Tom Borland 1960–61 Boston Red Sox
Jeff Bronkey 1993–95 Texas Rangers, Milwaukee Brewers
Corey Brown 2011–14 Washington Nationals, Boston Red Sox
Cal Browning 1960 St. Louis Cardinals
Ryan Budde 2007–10 Los Angeles Angels
Larry Burchart 1969 Cleveland Indians
Jeromy Burnitz 1993–96, 1998–2006 New York Mets, Cleveland Indians, Milwaukee Brewers, Los Angeles Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates
Jay Canizaro 1996, 1999–2002 San Francisco Giants, Minnesota Twins
Doug Dascenzo 1988–93, 1996 Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers, San Diego Padres
Carlos Diaz 1990 Toronto Blue Jays
Gordie Dillard 1988–89 Baltimore Orioles, Philadelphia Phillies
Danny Doyle 1943 Boston Red Sox
Monty Fariss 1991–93 Texas Rangers, Florida Marlins
John Farrell 1987–90, 1993–96 Cleveland Indians, California Angels, Detroit Tigers
Josh Fields 2006–10 Chicago White Sox, Kansas City Royals
Koda Glover 2016–18 Washington Nationals
Gary Green 1986–92 San Diego Padres, Texas Rangers, Cincinnati Reds
Matt Hague 2012, 2014–15 Pittsburgh Pirates, Toronto Blue Jays
Andrew Heaney 2014–pres. Miami Marlins, Los Angeles Angels
Mike Henneman 1987–96 Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros, Texas Rangers
Joel Horlen 1961–72 Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics
Rex Hudson 1974 Los Angeles Dodgers
Jason Hursh 2016–17 Atlanta Braves
Pete Incaviglia 1986–91, 1993–98 Texas Rangers, Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros, Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees
Jason Jaramillo 2009–11 Pittsburgh Pirates
Frank Kellert 1953–56 St. Louis Cardinals, Baltimore Orioles, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs
Frank Linzy 1963, 1965–74 San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Milwaukee Brewers, Philadelphia Phillies
Mark Lukasiewicz 2001–02 Los Angeles Angels
Tyler Lyons 2016–pres. St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Yankees
Matt Mangini 2010 Seattle Mariners
Hersh Martin 1937–40, 1944–45 Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees
Dave Maurer 2000–02 San Diego Padres, Cleveland Indians
Jordy Mercer 2012–pres. Pittsburgh Pirates, Detroit Tigers
Ed Mickelson 1950, 1953, 1957 St. Louis Cardinals, St. Louis Browns, Chicago Cubs
Dave Mlicki 1992–93, 1995–2002 Cleveland Indians, New York Mets, Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros
Merlin Nippert 1962 Boston Red Sox
Andrew Oliver 2010–11 Detroit Tigers
Darrell Osteen 1965–67, 1970 Cincinnati Reds, Oakland Athletics
Danny Perez 1996 Milwaukee Brewers
Joe Price 1980–90 Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, Boston Red Sox, Baltimore Orioles
Tim Pugh 1992–97 Cincinnati Reds, Kansas City Royals, Detroit Tigers
Allie P. Reynolds 1942–52 Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees
Chris Richard 2000–03, 2009 St. Louis Cardinals, Baltimore Orioles, Colorado Rockies, Tampa Bay Rays
Scott Richmond 2008–09, 2011–12 Toronto Blue Jays
Rusty Ryal 2009–10 Arizona Diamondbacks
Jeff Salazar 2006–09 Colorado Rockies, Arizona Diamondbacks, Pittsburgh Pirates
Luke Scott 2005–13 Houston Astros, Baltimore Orioles, Tampa Bay Rays
Matt Smith 2006–07 New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies
Joe Stanka 1959 Chicago White Sox
Mickey Tettleton 1984–97 Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, Detroit Tigers, Texas Rangers
Danny Thompson 1970–76 Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers
Mike Thompson 1971, 1973–75 Washington Senators, St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves
Jim Traber 1984, 1986, 1988–89 Baltimore Orioles
Robin Ventura 1989–2004 Chicago White Sox, New York Mets, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers
Don Wallace 1967 California Angels
Donnie Walton 2019-pres. Seattle Mariners
Scott Watkins 1995 Minnesota Twins
Robbie Weinhardt 2010–11 Detroit Tigers
Dib Williams 1930–35 Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox
Scott Williamson 1999–2007 Cincinnati Reds, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres, Baltimore Orioles
Robbie Wine 1986–87 Houston Astros
Ab Wright 1935, 1944 Cleveland Indians, Boston Braves

Player awards

The following Cowboys were given the following awards, as voted on by the American Baseball Coaches Association, Baseball America, Collegiate Baseball, the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association, and Sporting News:[8]

National awards

First-Team All-Americans

All College World Series

Hall of Fame

The Oklahoma State Cowboy baseball program has produced four National College Baseball Hall of Famers, who were inducted in the first three years of its existence. Oklahoma State baseball has its own Hall of Fame, in which players and coaches have been inducted.[9]

National College Baseball Hall of Famers

  • Robin Ventura, 2006
  • Pete Incaviglia, 2007
  • Gary Ward, 2008
  • Tom Borland, 2013

Cowboy Baseball Hall of Famers

See also

References

  1. ^ Oklahoma State University Athletics Official Athletics Branding Manual (PDF). November 20, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  2. ^ "Division I Baseball Records" (PDF). NCAA.org. 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  3. ^ "2013 NCAA Division I Baseball Championship Record Book" (pdf). ncaa.org. pp. 5–8. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  4. ^ "1959 National Champions". Archived from the original on 2011-04-25. Retrieved 2011-04-16.
  5. ^ "Cowboy Baseball's O'Brate Stadium To Open In March 2020" (Press release). Oklahoma State Athletics. October 10, 2019. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "2021 Oklahoma State Cowboy Baseball Media Guide" (PDF). okstate.com. p. 78. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  7. ^ a b "2021 OU Baseball Media Guide" (PDF). soonersports.com. p. 79. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  8. ^ Cowboy Awards
  9. ^ Cowboy Baseball Hall of Fame

External links

This page was last edited on 17 June 2021, at 18:18
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