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Ohio Supreme Court elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The U.S. state of Ohio has a Supreme Court of seven members, who are elected for six-year terms. See also:

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  • ✪ Can the Police Use Evidence They Got Illegally? | Mapp v. Ohio

Transcription

Mr. Beat presents Supreme Court Briefs Cleveland, Ohio May 23, 1957 Someone sets a bomb off at Don King’s house. Yep, that Don King, the future boxer promoter who at the time was a controversial bookie who had many enemies. So yeah, apparently one of those enemies was whoever bombed his house that day. The Cleveland police got a tip that a another bookie named Virgil Ogletree might have been involved with the bombing, and that he was hiding out in the house of Dollree Mapp. They also suspected stuff to make a bomb might be at the house. Three Cleveland police officers get to Mapp’s house, knock on the door and she answers. They ask to enter, but Mapp says “you gotta warrant?” After the police say no, she refuses to let them in. Two of the officers leave, but one hangs out across the street to stake out the place. Three hours later, even more officers return and knock on her door. This time Mapp doesn’t answer, and they break down the door and enter without permission. Mapp asks again to see a warrant. One of the officers shows her a piece of paper that is supposedly the warrant. She snatches the paper and puts it in her blouse. The officer reaches inside her clothing and she resists while he tries to get it back. He eventually does it get it back, and that piece of paper is never seen again. The police handcuffed Mapp and continued to search her home. They did find Ogletree, who later was cleared of being connected to the bombing, but while they were looking for him they also found evidence of illegal gambling, a pistol, and a small collection of sexually explicit materials that a previous resident had left behind. The Cleveland police arrested Mapp for having the gambling stuff but was later cleared. However, she didn’t cooperate with authorities very well, and several months later they turned around and charged her with having the sexually explicit materials, which apparently was illegal in Ohio at the time. Illegal, Mr. Beat? Yes, in 1957 it was illegal to possess “obscene materials.” Mapp was found guilty and sentenced to up to seven years in prison. Mapp appealed to the Ohio Court of Appeals for the Eighth District, arguing that the Ohio law banning the possession of obscene material went against the First Amendment. But what about the Fourth Amendment, Mr. Beat? Well, surprisingly, the Fourth Amendment wasn’t Mapp’s focus, but she could have also said that the police broke the Fourth Amendment when they searched through her stuff. Specifically, the police had no probable cause to suspect her of having the sexually explicit books, and they couldn’t use the books as evidence in court because they were found without a warrant. In addition, Mapp could have argued to get the 4th Amendment applied to both the state and local level, not just the federal level. The Ohio Court of Appeals agreed with the lower court, so Mapp appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court. They also agreed, so she appealed to the Supreme uh Supreme Court. By this time, 4 years had passed since the police had raided Mapp’s home. The Court heard oral arguments on March 29, 1961. It was soon apparent that the Court didn’t give a darn about the First Amendment...in this case. Lemme finish. They didn’t give a darn about the First Amendment IN THIS CASE. Instead, they were all focused on the 4th amendment. You see, there was this law called the exclusionary rule. The exclusionary rule said you couldn’t use evidence if the police got it illegally. It had been applied since 1914 in the ruling for the case Weeks v. United States, but only at the federal level. In the 1949 decision Wolf v. Colorado, the Court had declined to extend exclusionary protections at the state level. On June 19, 1961, the Court announced its decision. They voted 6-3, in favor of Mapp, overturning her conviction. The reason? Not because of the First Amendment. Because of the Fourth Amendment. The police did not have a valid warrant, and so the Court threw out any evidence the Cleveland police got that day in May of 1957 when they raided Mapp’s home. They couldn’t use any of it. So yeah, the Court expanded the exclusionary rule to the state level, saying the 14th Amendment gave them the authority to do so. Mapp v. Ohio was really a win for the Fourth Amendment, though. It really put the 4th Amendment back on the map. Ha! Get it? Back on the map? And her name was Mapp? I don’t know why I’m a history teacher when clearly I should be a comedian. Anyway, people later called Dolly Mapp the “Rosa Parks of the Fourth Amendment.” Justice Tom Clark wrote the opinion. “The state, by admitting evidence unlawfully seized, serves to encourage disobedience to the federal Constitution which it is bound to uphold. Nothing can destroy a government more quickly than its failure to observe its own laws, or worse, its disregard of the charter of its own existence.” Oh snap Justice Clark. So yeah, more than anything, this case was a win for privacy. So whatever happened to Dolly Mapp? Well, she later was arrested for theft and dealing heroin. During her 10 years in prison, however, she became an activist for prisoner rights, especially for reducing sentences for drug offenses. After she was released from prison, she used all of her experience with courts to work for a nonprofit organization that gave legal help to inmates. I’ll see you for the next Supreme Court case, jury! You know, this case got me thinking... Which of the Bill of Rights do you think is most under attack right now? I think it's the 4th Amendment, obviously. That's why I brought up the question. But let me know in the comments below. And a shout out to a couple people this episode. First, my newest Patreon supporter, Matthew Clarke, Another Matthew in the house. Matthew Club, yes. Thank you for your support, Matthew. Also a shout out to my student. He's in guitar club with me. He wrote an original song, providing the backing music for this episode. So a shout out to Isaac. Great job, Isaac! Thanks for watching.

Contents

Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court

Six-year term beginning Jan. 1: 1945, 1951, 1957, 1963, 1969, 1975, 1981, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2005, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1944, 1950, 1956, 1962, 1968, 1974, 1980, 1986, 1992, 1998, 2004, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2016[1] Maureen O'Connor : 3,562,413  
2010[2] Eric Brown : 1,070,690 Maureen O'Connor : 2,232,724  
2004 C. Ellen Connally:2,017,602 Thomas J. Moyer: 2,309,107  
1998 Gary Tyack Thomas J. Moyer  
1992 Robert H. Gorman Thomas J. Moyer  
1986 Frank D. Celebrezze Thomas J. Moyer  
1980 Frank D. Celebrezze Sara J. Harper  
1978 s Frank D. Celebrezze Thomas M. Herbert  
1974 Joseph E. O'Neill C. William O'Neill  
1970 s William C. Bryant C. William O'Neill  
1968 John C. Duffy Kingsley A. Taft  
1962 Carl V. Weygandt Kingsley A. Taft  
1956 Carl V. Weygandt Willard D. Campbell  
1950 Carl V. Weygandt Francis B. Douglass  
1944 Carl V. Weygandt Walter B. Wanamaker  
1932 Carl V. Weygandt Carrington T. Marshall  
1920 Hugh L. Nichols Carrington T. Marshall  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (1)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 1: 1945, 1951, 1957, 1963, 1969, 1975, 1981, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2005, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1944, 1950, 1956, 1962, 1968, 1974, 1980, 1986, 1992, 1998, 2004, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2016[1] John P. O'Donnell : 2,022,514 Pat Fischer : 2,044,984  
2010[2] Mary Jane Trapp : 1,315,105 Judith Ann Lanzinger : 1,717,889  
2004 Nancy A. Fuerst: 1,838,137 Judith Ann Lanzinger: 2,443,514  
1998 Francis E. Sweeney Sr.: 1,677,791 Stephen W. Powell: 1,049,561  
1992 Francis E. Sweeney Sr.: 2,008,854 Mark P. Painter: 1,838,307  
1986 Francis E. Sweeney Sr.: 1,293,364 Robert E. Holmes: 1,326,736  
1980 Lawrence Grey: 870,736 Robert E. Holmes: 2,115,743  
1974 Frank D. Celebrezze Sheldon A. Taft  
1972 s Frank D. Celebrezze Robert E. Leach  
1970 s   Robert M. Duncan  
1968   John M. Matthias  
1962 James J. Mayer John M. Matthias  
1956 Merrill D. Brother John M. Matthias  
1954 s John H. Lamneck John M. Matthias  
1950 Charles H. Hubbell Edward S. Matthias  
1944 Charles H. Hubbell Edward S. Matthias  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (2)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 2: 1945, 1951, 1957, 1963, 1969, 1975, 1981, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2005, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1944, 1950, 1956, 1962, 1968, 1974, 1980, 1986, 1992, 1998, 2004, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2016[1] Cynthia Rice : 1,892,450 Pat DeWine : 2,438,641  
2010[2]   Paul Pfeifer : 2,384,122  
2004   Paul E. Pfeifer: 3,384,192  
1998 Ronald Suster: 781,103 Paul E. Pfeifer: 1,947,916  
1992 John T. Patton: 1,785,215 Paul E. Pfeifer: 2,015,685  
1986 Herbert R. Brown: 1,328,913 Joyce J. George: 1,306,049  
1980 Clifford F. Brown: 1,563,665 David D. Dowd, Jr.: 1,528,071  
1974 Clifford F. Brown Thomas M. Herbert  
1968 Merrill D. Brother Thomas M. Herbert  
1962 Richard T. Cole Paul M. Herbert  
1956 Evan P. Ford Thomas J. Herbert  
1950   William L. Hart James Metzenbaum
1944 Herbert S. Duffy William L. Hart  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (3)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 1: 1941, 1947, 1953, 1959, 1965, 1971, 1977, 1983, 1989, 1995, 2001, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1940, 1946, 1952, 1958, 1964, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2018 Michael P. Donnelly: 2,116,136 Craig Baldwin: 1,352,859  
2012[3] Michael J. Skindell : 1,252,688 Terrence O'Donnell : 2,804,629
2006 William M. O'Neill: 1,341,258 Terrence O'Donnell: 1,903,702  
2004 s William M. O'Neill: 1,635,718 Terrence O'Donnell: 2,496,863  
2000 Timothy Black: 1,869,060 Deborah L. Cook: 2,014,274  
1994 J. Ross Haffey: 864,786 Deborah L. Cook: 1,842,063  
1988 A. William Sweeney: 2,059,402 Paul R. Matia: 1,492,256  
1982 A. William Sweeney: 1,564,495 John W. McCormac: 1,148,239  
1976 A. William Sweeney Don P. Brown  
1970 Allen Brown J. J. P. Corrigan  
1964 Charles B. Zimmerman Francis B. Douglass  
1958 Charles B. Zimmerman Willard D. Campbell  
1952 Charles B. Zimmerman Francis B. Douglass  
1946 Charles B. Zimmerman Clinton DeWitt Boyd  
1940 Charles B. Zimmerman Clinton DeWitt Boyd  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (4)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 2: 1941, 1947, 1953, 1959, 1965, 1971, 1977, 1983, 1989, 1995, 2001, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1940, 1946, 1952, 1958, 1964, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2018 Melody J. Stewart : 1,803,277 Mary DeGenaro : 1,630,977  
2012[3] William O'Neill : 2,115,841 Robert Cupp : 1,912,850
2006 Ben Espy: 1,505,255 Robert R. Cupp: 1,712,584  
2000 Alice Robie Resnick: 2,312,073 Terrence O'Donnell: 1,740,516  
1994 Alice Robie Resnick: 1,645,061 Sara J. Harper: 1,144,143  
1988 Alice Robie Resnick: 1,917,510 Joyce J. George: 1,688,281  
1982 Ralph S. Locher: 1,437,584 William J. McCrone: 1,129,675  
1976 Ralph S. Locher William J. Morrissey  
1970   Leonard J. Stern  
1964 Joseph D. Bryan C. William O'Neill  
1960 s John W. Peck C. William O'Neill  
1958 Merrill D. Brother James Garfield Stewart  
1952 Kenneth B. Johnston James Garfield Stewart  
1948 s   James Garfield Stewart  
1946 Herbert S. Duffy Charles S. Bell  
1942 s T. J. Duffy Charles S. Bell  
1940 Judge MacBride Gilbert Bettman Arthur H. Day

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (5)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 1: 1943, 1949, 1955, 1961, 1967, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1997, 2003, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1942, 1948, 1954, 1960, 1966, 1972, 1978, 1984, 1990, 1996, 2002, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2020 John P. O'Donnell Sharon L. Kennedy
2014 Tom Letson: 692,030 Sharon L. Kennedy: 1,828,156
2012 s[3] Yvette McGee Brown: 1,769,123 Sharon L. Kennedy: 2,347,925
2008 Joseph Russo: 1,453,784 Maureen O'Connor: 2,970,588  
2002 Timothy Black: 1,276,497 Maureen O'Connor: 1,709,673  
1996 Peter M. Sikora: 1,138,106 Andrew Douglas: 2,230,601  
1990 Stuart J. Banks: 756,481 Andrew Douglas: 2,013,630  
1984 John E. Corrigan: 1,680,859 Andrew Douglas: 1,893,299  
1978 William B. Brown Richard M. Markus  
1972 William B. Brown Louis J. Schneider, Jr.  
1966 Clifford F. Brown Louis J. Schneider, Jr.  
1964 s Lynn B. Griffith Louis J. Schneider, Jr.  
1960 James F. Bell Earl R. Hoover  
1954 James F. Bell Henry A. Middleton  
1950 s   Henry A. Middleton W. H. Annat
Ralph Bartlett
Fred Dewey
Arthur W. Doyle
Dennis Dunlavy
Howard E. Faught
Martin L. Sweeney
1948 Charles H. Hubbell Edward C. Turner  
1942 William C. Dixon Roy H. Williams  
1936[4] Will P. Stephenson Roy H. Williams
1934 s[4] Howard Landis Bevis Roy H. Williams

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Justice (6)

Six-year term beginning Jan. 2: 1943, 1949, 1955, 1961, 1967, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1997, 2003, etc.
Elections scheduled: 1942, 1948, 1954, 1960, 1966, 1972, 1978, 1984, 1990, 1996, 2002, etc. (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate

Year Democrat Republican Other
2020 Jennifer Brunner Judith L. French
2014 John P. O'Donnell: 1,132,759 Judith L. French: 1,438,283
2008 Peter Sikora: 1,554,521 Evelyn Lundberg Stratton: 2,664,137  
2002 Janet Burnside: 1,290,412 Evelyn Lundberg Stratton: 1,599,165  
1996 Marianna Brown Bettman: 1,427,947 Evelyn Lundberg Stratton: 2,016,264  
1990 Stephanie Tubbs Jones: 1,255,556 J. Craig Wright: 1,319,422 J. Ross Haffey: 283,883
1984 James P. Celebrezze: 1,765,509 J. Craig Wright: 2,116,080  
1982 s James P. Celebrezze: 1,617,247 Blanche Krupansky: 1,301,423  
1978 Clifford F. Brown Paul W. Brown  
1972 Lloyd O. Brown Paul W. Brown  
1966 Joseph D. Bryan Paul W. Brown  
1964 s Rankin M. Gibson Paul W. Brown  
1960 Joseph H. Ellison Kingsley A. Taft  
1954   Kingsley A. Taft  
1948 Robert M. Sohngen Kingsley A. Taft  
1942 Willis Woehrle Metcalf Edward C. Turner  

First Constitution of Ohio (1803-1851)

Under the first constitution, joint sessions of the legislature elected judges to seven-year terms. Elections were generally in January, with judges seated in February. The state had three or four judges through this period.[5]

Second Constitution of Ohio (1851-1912)

Under the second constitution, five judges were elected to five-year terms, with one seat elected each autumn. The first election was autumn of 1851, with the top five candidates assigned terms by lot.[6] Chief Justice was not voted separately, but chosen by other means. Change of law added a sixth judge for the 1892 election, with term starting February 1893, and terms were increased to six years.[7] No elections were held in 1906 or 1907, when the state transitioned to electing two judges each in even numbered years and terms of sitting judges were extended to fit the new schedule.[8]

Candidates for first election, October 1851:[9]

Name Party Votes Term Expired[6]
William B. Caldwell Democrat 161,150 1853
Rufus P. Ranney Democrat 160,984 1857
Allen G. Thurman Democrat 147,724 1856
Thomas Welles Bartley Democrat 145,370 1854
John A. Corwin Democrat 145,099 1855
Sherlock James Andrews Whig 134,824  
Charles Cleveland Convers Whig 119,475  
Peter Odlin Whig 119,503  
Bellamy Storer Whig 135,946  
George B. Way Whig 119,000  
Jacob Brinkerhoff Free Soil 16,143  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (1)

Five-year term beginning February: 1857, 1862, 1867, 1872, 1877, 1882, 1887, 1892, 1897
Elections scheduled: 1856, 1861, 1866, 1871, 1876, 1881, 1886, 1891, 1896 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[10]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1856 Rufus P. Ranney : 156,438 Josiah Scott : 175,8181 Daniel Peck (Amer) : 23,868
1861 Thomas J. S. Smith : 151,987 Josiah Scott : 207,443  
1866 Thomas M. Key : 213,612 Josiah Scott : 256,263  
1871 George W. Geddes : 217,374 William H. West : 237,472  
1873 s Charles H. Scribner : 213,551 Walter F. Stone : 214,363  
1874 s George Rex : 238,307 William Wartenbee Johnson : 221,182  
1876 William E. Finck : 309,933 Washington W. Boynton : 318,772  
1881 Edward F. Bingham : 286,650 Nicholas Longworth II : 316,005  
1886 Martin Dewey Follett : 326,227 Marshall Jay Williams : 343,739  
1891 Gustavus H. Wald : 345,374 Marshall Jay Williams : 373,433  
1896[11] Everett D. Stark : 473,094 Marshall Jay Williams : 525,084  
1902[12] Michael Donnelly William B. Crew  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (2)

Five-year term beginning February: 1856, 1861, 1866, 1871, 1876, 1881, 1886, 1891, 1896
Elections scheduled: 1855, 1860, 1865, 1870, 1875, 1880, 1885, 1890, 1895 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[13]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1855 William Kennon, Sr. : 134,173 Jacob Brinkerhoff : 168,436  
1860 Thomas J. S. Smith : 199,850 Jacob Brinkerhoff : 212,854  
1865 Philadelph Van Trump : 193,284 Jacob Brinkerhoff : 224,958  
1870 Richard A. Harrison : 204,287 George W. McIlvaine : 229,629 Gideon T. Stewart (Pro) : 2,810
1875 Thomas Q. Ashburn : 292,328 George W. McIlvaine : 296,944  
1880 Martin Dewey Follett : 340,998 George W. McIlvaine : 364,045  
1885 Charles D. Martin : 341,712 Thaddeus A. Minshall : 361,216  
1890 George B. Okey : 353,628 Thaddeus A. Minshall : 362,896  
1895[14] William T. Mooney : 328,970 Thaddeus A. Minshall : 427,809  
1901[15] Joseph Hiddy James Latimer Price  

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (3)

Five-year term beginning February: 1855, 1860, 1865, 1870, 1875, 1880, 1885, 1890, 1895
Elections scheduled: 1854, 1859, 1864, 1869, 1874, 1879, 1884, 1889, 1894 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[16]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1854 Shepherd F. Norris : 109,075 Joseph Rockwell Swan : 188,498  
1859 Henry C. Whitman : 170,895 William Y. Gholson : 182,888  
1864 Philadelph Van Trump Luther Day  
1869 William J. Gilmore : 228,523 Luther Day : 236,300  
1874 William J. Gilmore : 237,556 Luther Day : 221,701  
1879 William J. Gilmore : 316,994 William Wartenbee Johnson : 336,009  
1884 Charles D. Martin : 378,965 William Wartenbee Johnson : 392,918  
1887 s Virgil P. Kline : 328,137 Franklin J. Dickman : 357,039  
1889 Martin Dewey Follett : 373,895 Franklin J. Dickman : 376,649  
1894[17] James D. Ermston : 274,635 John Allen Shauck : 410,011  
1900[18] Allen Smalley : 474,138 John Allen Shauck : 543,418 Lambertis B. Logan : (Union Reform) : 4,561
E. Jay Pinney (Prohibition) : 9,898
Daniel W. Wallace (Soc Lab) : 1,690
Albert Corbin (Soc Dem) : 4,628

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (4)

Five-year term beginning February: 1854, 1859, 1864, 1869, 1874, 1879, 1884, 1889, 1894
Elections scheduled: 1853, 1858, 1863, 1868, 1873, 1878, 1883, 1888, 1893 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[19]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1853[6] Thomas Welles Bartley unknown  
1858 Thomas Welles Bartley : 162,610 William Virgil Peck : 182,942  
1863 Philadelph Van Trump : 190,992 Hocking H. Hunter : 287,507  
1864 s Philadelph Van Trump William White  
1868 William E. Finck William White  
1873 Henry C. Whitman : 213,705 William White : 214,333  
1878 Alexander F. Hume : 270,839 William White : 274,337 Chilton A. White (NGL) : 38,033
William F. Ross (Pro) : 5,607
1883 Selwyn N. Owen : 360,295 John H. Doyle : 347,091  
1888 Lyman R. Critchfield : 396,236 Joseph Perry Bradbury : 415,842  
1893[20] John W. Sater : 346,823 Joseph Perry Bradbury : 422,256  
1899[21] De Witt C. Badger William Z. Davis  
1905[22] Hugh T. Mathers : 417,420 William Z. Davis : 462,115 Elihu J. Zeigler (Socialist) : 18,233
James Sterling (Pro) : 13,785
Max Eisenberg (Soc Lab) : 1,821

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (5)

Five-year term beginning February: 1853, 1858, 1863, 1868, 1873, 1878, 1883, 1888, 1893
Elections scheduled: 1852, 1857, 1862, 1867, 1872, 1877, 1882, 1887, 1892 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[23]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1852 William B. Caldwell : 147,976 Milton Sutliff
(Freesoil) : 22,518
Daniel A. Haynes
(Whig) : 130,507
1855 s Robert B. Warden : 132,039 Charles Cleveland Convers : 169,555  
1856 s Carrington W. Seal : 156,604 Ozias Bowen : 175,892 Samuel Brush
(American) : 23,329
1857 Henry C. Whitman : 159,103 Milton Sutliff : 160,342  
1862 Rufus P. Ranney : 185,078 Franklin T. Backus : 178,115  
1865 s Thomas M. Key : 193,422 John Welch : 225,182  
1867 Thomas M. Key : 240,941 John Welch : 243,480  
1872 John L. Green : 252,036 John Welch : 263,223  
1877 John W. Okey : 271,393 William Wartenbee Johnson : 251,758  
1882 John W. Okey : 315,753 John H. Doyle : 299,389  
1885 s Gibson Atherton : 335,383 William T. Spear : 363,770  
1887 Lyman R. Critchfield : 327,887 William T. Spear : 357,137  
1892[24] John B. Driggs : 400,953 William T. Spear : 402,932  
1898[25] Hugh L. Nichols : 345,883 William T. Spear : 408,879 Mahlon Rouch (Prohibition) : 7,597
Daniel L. Wallace (Soc Lab) : 5,787
Arthur A. Brown (Union Reform) : 10,550
1904[26] Phillip J. Renner : 357,331 William T. Spear : 587,448 George L. Case (Pro) : 19,239
Harry Lavin (Socialist) : 33,507
Edward Polster (Soc Lab) : 2,502
Osmon S. Ferris (Peoples) : 1,080

Candidates for Ohio Supreme Court Judge (6)

Five-year term beginning February: 1893, six-year terms beginning 1898, 1904[7]
Elections scheduled: 1892, 1897, 1903 (s = Special election held to fill the seat of a justice who did not complete a term.) BOLD TYPE indicates winning candidate[27]

Year Democrat Republican Other
1892 Thomas Beer : 401,048 Jacob F. Burket : 402,847  
1897[28] J. P. Spriggs Jacob F. Burket  
1903[29] Edward J. Dempsey : 358,898 Augustus N. Summers : 471,742 Jeremiah C. Cavanaugh (Socialist) : 14,041
E. Jay Pinney (Pro) : 13,493
Francis Henry (Soc Lab) : 2,152

Notes

  1. ^ a b c "Election Results 2016". Ohio Secretary of State.
  2. ^ a b c Ohio Secretary of State 2010 results
  3. ^ a b c Husted, Jon. "Election Results - Supreme Court of Ohio : November 6, 2012". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2012-12-17.
  4. ^ a b "Roy Hughes Williams". The Supreme Court of Ohio & The Ohio Judicial System. Retrieved 2011-08-08.
  5. ^ Gilkey 1901 : 467-471
  6. ^ a b c Gilkey 1901 : 472
  7. ^ a b Gilkey 1901 : 476
  8. ^ Sandles, A P; Doty, E W (eds.). The biographical annals of Ohio 1906-1907-1908 : A handbook of the Government and Institutions of the State of Ohio. State of Ohio. p. 694.
  9. ^ Bell 1876 : 115
  10. ^ Smith 1898 : 65, 140, 228, 286, 319, 331, 365, 449, 526, 605, 693
  11. ^ Williams elected to six-year term in 1896
  12. ^ Powell 1913 : 392-393
  13. ^ Smith 1898 : 40, 128, 209, 277, 342, 433, 511, 592, 665
  14. ^ Minshall elected to six-year term in 1895
  15. ^ Powell 1913 : 379-380
  16. ^ Smith 1898 : 27, 95, 188, 268, 331, 406, 498, 541, 579, 655
  17. ^ Shauck elected to six-year term in 1894
  18. ^ Kinney, Charles (1900). Annual Report of the Secretary of State to the Governor of the State of Ohio for the year ending November 15, 1900. State of Ohio. p. 193.
  19. ^ Smith 1898 : 84, 161, 188, 242, 319, 393, 473, 566, 644
  20. ^ Bradbury elected to six-year term in 1893
  21. ^ Powell 1913 : 371-372
  22. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 21 of pdf file
  23. ^ Smith 1898 : 27, 40, 65, 74, 150, 209, 238, 305, 379, 460, 511, 541, 630
  24. ^ spear elected to six-year term in 1892
  25. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 1215 of pdf file
  26. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 846 of pdf file
  27. ^ Smith 1898 : 630
  28. ^ Powell 1913 : 360
  29. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 1671 of pdf file

References

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