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Not All the Beautiful Things

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Not All the Beautiful Things
The album cover shows a leaping chrome stallion streaked with blue at its centre, surrounded by a twilight-coloured backdrop. The artist's name is written below the image in block capitals and highlighted in blue.
Album front cover by Luke Eblen
Studio album by
Released9 March 2018 (2018-03-09)
Recorded2015–2018
Studio
Genre
Length46:46
Label
Producer
Singles from Not All the Beautiful Things
  1. "Be Ok Again"
    Released: 28 November 2017
  2. "Stuck in Orbit"
    Released: 30 January 2018
  3. "Beautiful"
    Released: 27 February 2018

Not All the Beautiful Things is the debut studio album by Australian musical project What So Not, which is the performing name of DJ and producer, Chris Emerson. It was released on 9 March 2018 through Counter Records and Sweat It Out. What So Not began work on the album after completing a six-year long global tour, which had left him unable to commit fully to working on a studio album. His frequent travels influenced the sound of many of the album's tracks, including "Beautiful" and "Us". What So Not chose the record's title because the "simple pleasures" of life are ignored by people who focus only on their grandiose ideas.

The record contains twelve songs, all featuring production collaborations and performances with a range of artists: Toto, Skrillex, Dyro, Daniel Johns and San Holo. Its songwriting was managed by a list of co-writers, inclusive of Anna Lunoe, Off Bloom and Ryan McMahon of Captain Cuts. The tracks comprise What So Not's signature future bass and trap sounds, while experimenting with other electronic music genres including hip hop, dubstep, and house.

It received generally positive reviews from music critics, who praised the featured guests and production quality. The record includes three singles — "Be Ok Again" with Daniel Johns in November 2017, "Stuck in Orbit" with Buoy in January 2018, and "Beautiful" with Winona Oak in February 2018. In support of the album, What So Not embarked on an international tour named the Beautiful Things World Tour which lasted from January to May 2018. It charted in the United States (Dance/Electronic Albums) and Australia (ARIA), peaking at number eight and fourteen respectively.

Background and development

What So Not performing at the stage of the North Coast Music Festival, with his artist name displayed on the front screen.
What So Not performing at the North Coast Music Festival, Chicago in August 2014

Not All the Beautiful Things was issued by Australian electronic music project, What So Not, also known as Emoh Instead. He had previously released four extended plays (EPs) under his project name. Three of these were co-produced with Australian artist Flume who left the project in February 2015, which at that time What So Not had carried the majority of the project by performing on his own.[1][2] After touring extensively, What So Not returned to Sydney in 2017 hoping to complete work on a studio-length album, which ultimately became Not All the Beautiful Things.[3] He had been unable to do so while on the move, saying: "I had a few test runs with EPs and things, particularly with Divide and Conquer, but I don't think I could have really done an album before this point, because I ended up on tour for almost six years."[4]

What So Not's experiences while performing influenced several of the album's songs. For example, he said the song "Beautiful" was created while he was backpacking and camping in Nicaragua.[5] He had also written multiple tracks in a Nicaraguan songwriting workshop organised by Neon Gold Records.[6] What So Not took on the role of creative director for the first time in his career on Not All the Beautiful Things. This gave him control over the production, songwriting, film scoring and its direction. He felt this led to a "cohesive narrative" across all creative aspects of the project.[7] It was recorded from 2015 to 2018, in between touring.[5]

What So Not said the record's title was a "tribute to the things we lose along the way when we're striving for things", in particular when individuals focus on "all these grand goals" and "forget everything that's in front of them."[8] He also said the title encompasses the entire narrative of the album and encapsulates his own dramatic endings to personal relationships.[9] The producer said while working on the album he avoided "putting any pressure on [himself]" in the onset and simply tried to have it completed by a certain point.[4] He focused on the record's songwriting and toplining (lyrical writing over a pre-made track).[9] Originally, as many as 100 song demos were made for it, but only 12 tracks that fit the artist's narrative were used.[4] What So Not described its songs as "brutally honest and raw", representing his attempts to "[dive] into the deep end with things [he had] maybe never tried before."[5]

Not All the Beautiful Things includes collaborations with other artists the producer describes as people that he has admired and befriended across the years.[5] He said that the collaboration with Daniel Johns occurred during a time when they "randomly crossed paths and hit it off".[4] The collaboration with Toto surprised him as the band had not previously worked with a dance music producer. They reportedly held jam sessions where What So Not would play some chords, a riff, or a drum beat and the band would "riff over the top and do a call and response thing."[4]

In January 2018, the DJ announced its release date as 9 March via Counter Records / Sweat It Out / Warner Music Australia, and publicised its track list.[7][10][11] The record primarily incorporates What So Not's signature trap and future bass sound,[9] while encompassing bass music,[5] hip hop,[12] dubstep, and house.[9] A remix album was later released on 16 November 2018, comprising remixes by eleven different artists including 12th Planet, Marlo and Graves.[13][14]

An international tour was announced in January 2018, the Beautiful Things World Tour.[15] Lasting from 19 January to 4 May, the event brought the DJ to many international festivals including Ultra, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, as well as performances in India, China, Europe, South America and North America.[16] The Australian leg of the tour took in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane in June 2018.[17] What So Not used a new touring rig for his shows, which include a large chrome horse and chariot set-up.[15]

Singles

The album's first single, "Be Ok Again", was released on 28 November 2017 and featured Australian singer Daniel Johns, former frontman of the rock band Silverchair.[18] The single included uncredited vocals by What So Not, marking his first recorded vocal performance.[19] Dancing Astronaut's David Klemow described "Be Ok Again" as a future bass track which "plays upon the project's earliest core appeals, returning to fluttering vocal work over bold, bombastic build ups and wiry, off-kilter breaks".[20] What So Not, who described the song as a "really personal track",[21] said it originated during a studio session in 2017 with music and production duo Slumberjack (Morgan Then, Fletcher Ehlers).[18] Daniel Johns was walking by; he invited What So Not to collaborate at the singer's Newcastle studio.[18] Johns had also co-written two more of the record's songs: "If You Only Knew" and "Same Mistakes". He reacted positively to his collaboration with What So Not, stating: "Watching [What So Not] work is eye opening".[22] The track's music video, co-directed with Australian film maker Luke Eblen, was released on 23 January 2018.[23][24] Eblen had also provided the album's cover art (see above).

"Stuck in Orbit" was released on 30 January 2018 as its second single. It features Sydney-based singer Buoy (Charmian Kingston) and was co-produced with Jono Ma of Australian psychedelic dance band Jagwar Ma.[25][26][27] In an emailed statement to Billboard, What So Not revealed that the song started as a jam with Jona Ma in his film scoring studio (Sonar Music).[28] The vocals "began as a sketch of ad libs from Buoy with only two words, drawn out across the verse 'I ov-er comp-en-sate'".[27] He discovered Buoy's vocals through a local community radio station in Australia. After learning she lived near his parents in Sydney, they met up to collaborate.[12] One night when an airport system crash had left the DJ stranded, he channeled his frustrations musically and came up with the lyrics for "Stuck In Orbit". After returning home he brainstormed the final elements of the vocals with Winona Oak (Johanna Ekmark) and Buoy.[27] The song was recorded through Skype, due to What So Not's busy touring schedule, which made it difficult for him to spend time in his studio.[5]

"Beautiful", featuring Winona Oak, was released on 27 February 2018 as the final single.[29][30] Critics praised the "hypnotic, carefree aesthetic" of the track which complements Oak's "show-stopping" vocals.[31] What So Not explained the song was constructed in a Nicaraguan songwriting camp where he met Oak,[32] and this influenced the track's sound design. Ryan McMahon of production trio Captain Cuts (Ben Berger, Ryan McMahon, Ryan Rabin) was involved with the vocal ad-libbing of the song. They worked on the idea of "beautiful pain", which led to a song of "optimism, anxiousness and longing, but also an undertone of sadness".[29] House music producer Chris Lake gave him production tips on "how to do a few things I had forgotten."[12]

Reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[33]
Exclaim!6/10[34]
Themusic4/5 stars[35]

Music critics were generally positive towards Not All the Beautiful Things, with most praising the collaborations and production values; although some felt parts were too predictable. Matthew Meadow from Your EDM complimented the common themes shared between each track and The Music's Emma Salisbury felt that the "unique flavors" inhabited by the tracks led to a "well-curated, well-rounded work on a bed of exquisite production".[36][35] The former selected "We Keep On Running" with Toto as his favourite track, citing the "powerful production" and the song's "plucky transform[ation] into distorted rock" at the drop.[36] Hayden Manders of Nylon praised the songs where the DJ had "full control", notably the closing track "Us" which she described as a "cosmic journey through a couple's private life in a public sphere". The critic also described the record as a "fully packaged, uncompromised artistic vision", rather than "an electronic dance album filled with singles ripe for remixing but a fully packaged".[3]

The collaborations with other musical artists were also widely praised, with Manders of Nylon writing that the artist collaborations "work to a satisfying extent" while Neil Z. Yeung from AllMusic commenting that the collaborations with the "inspired guests and fellow Aussies" resulted in a "pleasant journey through different pockets of electronic dance featuring a handful of synth throbbers and pretty electronic soundscapes".[3][33] Hampson of Exclaim! also called the album's guests "inventive" and lauded the record's promising opening.[34]

However, several elements of Not All The Beautiful Things were not as well received by critics, especially its predictability and tendency to sound clumped up. Exclaim!'s Hampson felt the record was predictable after its first two tracks, with songs "capitalizing on uninspired progressions and slopped in a grime we've heard the world over", while AllMusic's Yeung noted that sections of the album occasionally "sound like a mishmash of multiple artists vying for the same spotlight".[34][33] Contrasting Your EDM's opinion, Hampson from Exclaim! gave a lukewarm reception to the Toto collaboration, calling it a "bad Top 40 anthem any number of at-the-moment pop stars might throw out." [34]

In Australia, Not All the Beautiful Things peaked at number 14 on the ARIA Top 100 Albums chart,[37][38] surpassing What So Not's previous extended play Divide & Conquer which hit number 19.[38] On the ARIA Top 100 Physical Albums and ARIA Digital Albums charts, the record ranked at number twenty-five and number eight respectively.[39][40] It then peaked at number four on the ARIA Australian Artists Albums chart, and number two on the ARIA Dance Albums chart.[39] The single "Be Ok Again" climbed to number 19 on the ARIA Heatseekers chart,[41] while the Volac, Zeke Beats and Kaz James remixes of "Beautiful" charted for eight weeks on the ARIA Club Tracks charts and peaked at number 17.[42] On the Billboard Dance/Electronic Albums chart, the album peaked at number eight for one week.[43]

Track listing

Track list adapted from the iTunes Store,[44] and credits adapted from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers[45] and Australasian Performing Right Association / Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society.[46]

No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Warlord" (with Slumberjack)
  • Chris Emerson
  • Sheng Yee Then
  • Fletcher Ehlers
2:55
2."Be Ok Again" (featuring Daniel Johns)
  • Emerson
  • Daniel Johns
3:47
3."Beautiful" (featuring Winona Oak)
3:45
4."Stuck In Orbit" (featuring Buoy)
5:25
5."Demons" (featuring Rome Fortune and Tommy Swisher)
  • Emerson
  • Jerome Fortune
  • Tommy Swisher
2:29
6."Goh" (with Skrillex featuring KLP)
3:35
7."We Keep On Running" (with Toto)4:39
8."If You Only Knew" (with San Holo featuring Daniel Johns)
3:12
9."Monsters" (featuring Michael Christmas and Tobi Lou)
  • Emerson
  • Michael Christmas
  • Tobi Lou
  • Sidhu
3:01
10."Bottom End" (with Dyro)
3:11
11."Same Mistakes" (featuring Daniel Johns)
  • Emerson
  • Johns
  • Rushdent
4:31
12."Us" (featuring Daniels)
  • Emerson
  • Jaramye Daniels
  • Georgia Ku Overton
6:16
Total length:46:46

Remix album

Track list adapted from the iTunes Store.[13]

Remixes
No.TitleLength
1."Stuck in Orbit" (Kidswaste Remix)4:17
2."Goh" (Signal Remix)3:51
3."Stuck in Orbit" (Luttrell Remix)6:18
4."Beautiful" (Eskei83 Remix)2:45
5."If You Only Knew" (12th Planet Remix)3:31
6."Goh" (AC Slater Remix)4:31
7."Beautiful" (Yvng Jalapeno Remix)3:00
8."Goh" (Champagne Drip Remix)3:37
9."If You Only Knew" (Graves Remix)2:56
10."If You Only Knew" (Daktyl Remix)2:36
11."Beautiful" (Marlo Remix)4:26

Personnel

Credits adapted from the album liner notes.[47]

Technical credits

Recording personnel

Charts

Chart (2018) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[48] 14
US Top Dance/Electronic Albums (Billboard)[49] 8

Release history

Country Date Label Format Ref
UK 9 March 2018 Counter Records Digital download [44]
CD [50]
Australia Sweat It Out / Counter Records LP [51][52]

References

  1. ^ Bein, Kat (9 September 2016). "Hear a Solo-Emoh Sound on What So Not's Divide and Conquer EP". Billboard. Archived from the original on 1 December 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Baroni, Nastassia (23 February 2015). "Flume has officially left What So Not". MusicFeeds. Archived from the original on 7 April 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b c Manders, Hayden (9 March 2018). "What So Not is finally ready to debut". Nylon. Retrieved 7 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b c d e Wilson, Zanda (8 March 2018). "What So Not Talks Collaborating With 'Africa' Legends Toto, Trying To "Out-Weird" Daniel Johns On His Debut Album". musicfeeds.au. Archived from the original on 18 March 2018. Retrieved 7 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b c d e f Kocay, Lisa (9 March 2018). "What So Not Discusses New Album and Working with Toto and Skrillex". Forbes. Archived from the original on 8 December 2018. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Purkrabek, Sarah (10 April 2017). "What So Not took a nreak from touring to find his groove in Nicaragua". Insomniac. Archived from the original on 7 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ a b Lambert, Tim (9 March 2018). "Q&A with What So Not". Stack. Archived from the original on 12 March 2018. Retrieved 7 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Price, Jai (27 February 2018). "What So Not on his new album Not All the Beautiful Things, staying grounded and coping with the hype". Music Insight. Archived from the original on 9 April 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ a b c d Torres, Matt (12 April 2018). "Interview: What So Not Talks Not All the Beautiful Things". Soundazed. Archived from the original on 5 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Murphy, Sam (31 January 2018). "What So Not Announces Debut Album Not All the Beautiful Things, drops new single". Musicfeeds. Archived from the original on 10 June 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ Lefevre, Jules (9 March 2018). "What So Not's massive debut album has finally landed". inthemix. Archived from the original on 4 July 2018. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ a b c Cirisano, Tatiana (9 March 2018). "How Australian DJ What So Not tapped Toto, Skrillex & more for his debut album". Billboard. Archived from the original on 16 May 2018. Retrieved 3 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ a b "Not All the Beautiful Things (Remixes) by What So Not on Apple Music". iTunes Store. Retrieved 10 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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  15. ^ a b Klemow, David (16 January 2018). "What So Not announces 30+ date 'Beautiful Things' world tour". Dancing Astronaut. Archived from the original on 10 February 2018. Retrieved 10 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ Gilmore, Grant (16 January 2018). "What So Not Announces Dates for Beautiful Things World Tour". EDM Identity. Archived from the original on 10 July 2018. Retrieved 10 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ Williams, Tom (27 February 2018). "What So Not announces 2018 national tour". MusicFeeds. Archived from the original on 3 May 2018. Retrieved 10 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ a b c Newstead, Al (28 November 2017). "First Spin: What So Not and Daniel Johns team up for 'Be Ok Again'". Triple J (Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)). Archived from the original on 27 February 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "'Be Ok Again' / What So Not featuring Daniel Johns". Ninjatune. Retrieved 8 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ Klemow, David (28 November 2017). "What So Not delivers drifting new future bass product 'Be Ok Again'". Dancing Astronaut. Archived from the original on 27 February 2018. Retrieved 3 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ Meadow, Matthew (28 November 2017). "What So Not drops new track 'Be Ok Again' with Daniel Johns". Your EDM. Archived from the original on 1 January 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ Cashmere, Paul (29 November 2017). "What So Not release 'Be Ok Again' featuring Daniel Johns". Noise11. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  23. ^ Castillo, Ryan (25 January 2018). "What So Not releases official video for 'Be Ok Again'". Dancing Astronaut. Archived from the original on 5 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  24. ^ "What So Not - 'Be Ok Again' feat. Daniel Johns (Official Music Video)". YouTube. Retrieved 9 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  25. ^ Dexter, Robyn (30 January 2018). "What So Not announces stacked debut LP, releases new single". Dancing Astronaut. Archived from the original on 10 February 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  26. ^ Meadow, Matthew (30 January 2018). "What So Not drops the curtain on his debut album including long-awaited Skrillex collab". Your EDM. Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  27. ^ a b c Bein, Kat (30 January 2018). "What So Not teases debut album with single "Stuck in Orbit": Exclusive". Billboard. Archived from the original on 6 February 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  28. ^ "People - Sonar". Sonar Music. Retrieved 12 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ a b Powell, Karlie (27 February 2018). "What So Not drops absolutely 'Beautiful' track as 3rd single off debut album". Your EDM. Archived from the original on 16 June 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  30. ^ Manders, Hayden (27 February 2018). "What So Not introduces Winona Oak with 'Beautiful'". Nylon. Retrieved 3 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  31. ^ Klemow, David (1 March 2018). "What So Not delivers final single, 'Beautiful', from hotly anticipated upcoming LP". Dancing Astronaut. Archived from the original on 5 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  32. ^ Mode, Nadee (20 September 2018). "Interview: What So Not divulges before his heart-thumping set at Good Vibes Fest '18". Lipstiq. Archived from the original on 20 September 2018. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  33. ^ a b c Z. Yeung, Neil. "Not All the Beautiful Things - What So Not". AllMusic. Retrieved 3 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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  35. ^ a b Salisbury, Emma (6 March 2018). "What So Not - Not All The Beautiful Things". The Music. Archived from the original on 6 March 2018. Retrieved 3 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  36. ^ a b Meadow, Matthew (9 March 2018). "What So Not Unleashes Debut Album Featuring Skrillex & Toto Collaborations". Your EDM. Archived from the original on 16 June 2018. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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  40. ^ Wallace, Ian (26 March 2018). "Week Commencing ~ 26th March 2018 ~ Issue #1465" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1465): 5, 8, 10, 15–17. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 March 2018. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  41. ^ Wallace, Ian (11 December 2017). "Week Commencing ~ 11th December 2017 ~ Issue #1450" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1450): 21. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  42. ^ Wallace, Ian (9 July 2018). "Week Commencing ~ 9th July 2018 ~ Issue #1480" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1480): 20. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 July 2018. Retrieved 11 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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  50. ^ "What So Not - Not All the Beautiful Things Audio CD". Amazon. Retrieved 10 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  51. ^ "What So Not - Not All the Beautiful Things LP". Amazon. Retrieved 10 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  52. ^ "What So Not - Not All the Beautiful Things (12" vinyl)". Sweat It Out. Retrieved 10 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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