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Northeastern Huskies men's ice hockey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Northeastern Huskies men's ice hockey
Current season
Northeastern Huskies men's ice hockey athletic logo
UniversityNortheastern University
ConferenceHockey East
Head coachJim Madigan
9th season, 158–122–35 (.557)
Captain(s)Ryan Shea
Alternate captain(s)Matt Filipe
John Picking
Zach Solow
ArenaMatthews Arena
Capacity: 4,666
LocationBoston, Massachusetts
Student sectionThe DogHouse
ColorsRed and Black[1]
         
NCAA Tournament Frozen Four
1982
NCAA Tournament appearances
1982, 1988, 1994, 2009, 2016, 2018, 2019
Conference Tournament championships
ECAC: 1982
Hockey East: 1988, 2016, 2019
Current uniform
HE-Uniform-NU.png
Huskies vs. Cornell, 2019 East regional
Huskies vs. Cornell, 2019 East regional

The Northeastern Huskies men's ice hockey team is a NCAA Division I college ice hockey program that represents Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. The team has competed in Hockey East since 1984 and has won three tournament titles, having previously played in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC), where they won one tournament championship. The Huskies currently play home games at the 4,666-seat Matthews Arena, the world's oldest hockey arena still in use.[2] Former player Jim Madigan has coached the Huskies since 2011.

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  • ✪ 2019 Hockey East Championship: Northeastern vs. Boston College
  • ✪ Northeastern Men's Ice Hockey | 2018-19 Season Recap
  • ✪ Northeastern Men's Ice Hockey vs UConn | Game Recap | Mar. 4, 2017 | Hockey East Opening Round
  • ✪ Highlights- Men's Ice Hockey vs Northeastern Hockey East Quarterfinals Game 1
  • ✪ 2019 Hockey East Semifinal Highlights - Northeastern vs. Boston University

Transcription

Contents

History

The men's ice hockey program has existed since 1929 and played as an independent NCAA Division I team until joining the ECAC in 1961. Northeastern is a founding member of the Hockey East athletic conference, which the team joined in 1984. The Huskies had their most success in the 1980s, when the team won the prestigious Beanpot tournament four times (1980, 1984, 1985, 1988) and was the runner-up twice (1983 and 1987). The Huskies ended a 30-year Beanpot drought in 2018, capturing their fifth championship. Its best season came in 1982, when the Huskies finished 25–9–2 and made it to the NCAA Frozen Four. They also won the Hockey East championship in 1988, 2016, and 2019, and made appearances in the NCAA hockey tournament in 1988, 1994, 2009, 2016, 2018, and 2019.

Brad Thiessen was named to the Hockey East All-Rookie team in 2007.
Brad Thiessen was named to the Hockey East All-Rookie team in 2007.

Northeastern players who have gone on to significant professional hockey careers have included David Poile '71, long time general manager of the NHL Washington Capitals and current general manager of the NHL Nashville Predators, St. Louis Blues goaltender and two-time All-American Bruce Racine '88, NHL defenseman Dan McGillis, Montreal Canadiens winger Chris Nilan, and Chicago Blackhawks defenseman and Hobey Baker Award finalist Jim Fahey '02.

Other than those who have achieved success in the professional ranks, some of the more notable individual players in team history include Adam Gaudette, the reigning Hobey Baker Award winner as the most valuable player in NCAA collegiate hockey (the only such winner in the program's history); Art Chisholm and Ray Picard, each two-time All-Americans; and Sandy Beadle and Jason Guerriero, each a one-time All-American who was also a Hobey Baker Award finalist. Chisholm is the leading career goal scorer for the Huskies with 100, while Jim Martel is the career scoring leader with 210 points. The most notable goaltenders in team history are Racine and Keni Gibson, who between them hold most school career records. Brad Thiessen, who turned professional after his junior year (2009), broke Gibson's school record with eight career shutouts by his sophomore season and had been threatening several career goaltending records.

Season-by-season results[3]

Head Coaches

As of the completion of 2018–19 season[3]

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1929–1936 H. Nelson Raymond 7 26–28–5 .483
1936–1942, 1946–1955 Herb Gallagher 15 108–122–6 .470
1942–1943 William L. Linskey 1 7–6–0 .538
1955–1970 Jim Bell 15 154–218–4 .415
1970–1989 Fernie Flaman 19 256–301–24 .461
1989–1991 Don McKenney 2 24–44–4 .361
1991–1996 Ben Smith 5 71–91–18 .444
1996–2005 Bruce Crowder 9 120–170–36 .423
2005–2011 Greg Cronin 6 87–104–29 .461
2011–Present Jim Madigan 9 158–122–35 .557
Totals 10 coaches 87 seasons 1011-1206–161 .459

Roster

As of January 20, 2020.[4]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team NHL rights
1 Massachusetts Nick Scarpa Sophomore G 5' 8" (1.73 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1997-01-23 Andover, Massachusetts Valley (EHL)
2 Massachusetts Jordan Harris Sophomore D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 2000-07-07 Haverhill, Massachusetts Kimball Union (USHS–NH) MTL, 71st overall 2018
3 Rhode Island Jayden Struble Freshman D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 2001-09-08 Cumberland, Rhode Island St. Sebastian's (USHS–MA) MTL, 46th overall 2019
4 Quebec Jérémie Bucheler Freshman D 6' 4" (1.93 m) 194 lb (88 kg) 2000-03-31 Saint-Laurent, Quebec Victoria (BCHL)
5 Massachusetts Ryan Shea (C) Senior D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-02-11 Milton, Massachusetts Youngstown (USHL) CHI, 121st overall 2015
6 Massachusetts Collin Murphy Junior D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 191 lb (87 kg) 1998-11-27 Wilmington, Massachusetts Muskegon (USHL)
7 Massachusetts John Picking (A) Senior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 174 lb (79 kg) 1995-03-12 Wellesley, Massachusetts Boston Jr. Bruins (USPHL)
8 New Jersey Julian Kislin Sophomore D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 182 lb (83 kg) 1999-05-24 Manalapan, New Jersey Youngstown (USHL)
9 Florida Tyler Madden Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 150 lb (68 kg) 1999-11-09 Deerfield Beach, Florida Tri-City (USHL) VAN, 68th overall 2018
12 Massachusetts Austin Goldstein Junior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 167 lb (76 kg) 1997-02-05 Reading, Massachusetts Islanders (USPHL)
13 Massachusetts T. J. Walsh Freshman F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 168 lb (76 kg) 2000-04-29 Shrewsbury, Massachusetts Des Moines (USHL)
15 New Jersey Grant Jozefek Senior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 186 lb (84 kg) 1997-10-25 Chester, New Jersey Lincoln (USHL)
16 Massachusetts Matt Thomson Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1998-11-07 Reading, Massachusetts Cedar Rapids (USHL)
17 Massachusetts Matt Filipe (A) Senior F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1997-12-31 Lynnfield, Massachusetts Cedar Rapids (USHL) CAR, 67th overall 2016
18 Ontario Tyler Spott Freshman D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 174 lb (79 kg) 2000-06-17 Toronto, Ontario Green Bay (USHL)
19 Massachusetts Riley Hughes Freshman F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 174 lb (79 kg) 2000-06-27 Westwood, Massachusetts Victoria (BCHL) NYR, 216th overall 2018
20 Connecticut Alex Mella Freshman F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1999-02-21 Stamford, Connecticut Madison (USHL)
21 Massachusetts Matt DeMelis Freshman F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1999-06-02 Hingham, Massachusetts Youngstown (USHL)
22 Connecticut Billy Carrabino Junior D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 189 lb (86 kg) 1997-03-20 New Canaan, Connecticut Boston Jr. Bruins (USPHL)
23 New Hampshire Mike Kesselring Freshman D 6' 4" (1.93 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 2000-01-13 New Hampton, New Hampshire Fargo (USHL) EDM, 164th overall 2018
24 Florida A. J. Villella Sophomore D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-01-26 Davie, Florida Sioux Falls (USHL)
25 Massachusetts Aidan McDonough Freshman F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 201 lb (91 kg) 1999-11-06 Milton, Massachusetts Cedar Rapids (USHL) VAN, 195th overall 2019
26 Illinois Biagio Lerario Senior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1995-09-22 Addison, Illinois Lincoln (USHL)
27 Massachusetts Neil Shea Freshman F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 195 lb (88 kg) Marshfield, Massachusetts Chicago (USHL)
28 Florida Zach Solow (A) Junior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-11-06 Naples, Florida Dubuque (USHL)
29 Massachusetts Craig Pantano (A) Senior G 6' 1" (1.85 m) 170 lb (77 kg) Bridgewater, Massachusetts Merrimack (HEA)
30 New Hampshire Curtis Frye Senior G 6' 3" (1.91 m) 215 lb (98 kg) 1995-07-25 Northwood, New Hampshire Philadelphia (USPHL)
31 New York (state) Connor Murphy Freshman G 6' 4" (1.93 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1998-09-01 Hudson Falls, New York Carleton Place (CCHL)
39 New Jersey Brendan van Riemsdyk Senior F 6' 4" (1.93 m) 210 lb (95 kg) Middletown, New Jersey Durham (HEA)

Statistical Leaders[5]

Career points leaders

Player Years GP G A Pts PIM
Jim Martel 1972–1976 110 93 117 210
Charlie Huck 1972–1976 110 93 99 192
Rod Isbister 1982–1986 127 79 110 189
Art Chisholm 1958–1961 72 100 82 182
Dave Sherlock 1972–1976 89 72 100 172
Jordan Shields 1992–1996 142 62 104 168
Harry Mews 1986–1990 133 64 101 165
Ken Manchurek 1980–1984 111 76 86 162
Kevin Heffernan 1984–1988 143 58 96 154
Mike Holmes 1974–1978 108 25 127 152

Career goaltending leaders

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average

minimum 50 games played

Player Years GP Min W L T GA SO SV% GAA
Cayden Primeau 2017–2019 70 4134 44 18 6 138 8 .932 2.00
Brad Thiessen 2006–2009 111 6661 52 46 12 266 9 .922 2.40
Clay Witt 2010–2015 71 3930 31 27 5 172 5 .920 2.63
Ryan Ruck 2015–2019 86 4921 44 28 8 213 4 .904 2.60
Keni Gibson 2001–2005 115 6765 46 51 15 303 7 .909 2.69

Rico Rossi is the Huskies' career penalty minute leader with 406; Eric Williams is the career games leader with 155.

Statistics current through the start of the 2019–20 season.

Awards and honors

NCAA

Individual awards

All-American teams

AHCA First Team All-Americans

AHCA Second Team All-Americans

  • 1947–48: Jim Bell, F
  • 1983–84: Ken Manchurek, F
  • 1984–85: Jim Averill, F
  • 1987–88: Brian Dowd, D
  • 2014–15: Kevin Roy, F
  • 2018–19: Jeremy Davies, F


ECAC Hockey

Individual awards

All-Conference teams

First Team All-ECAC Hockey

  • 1962–63: Leo Dupere, F
  • 1963–64: Leo Dupere, F
  • 1980–81: Sandy Beadle, F

Second Team All-ECAC Hockey

  • 1963–64: Larry Bone, F
  • 1964–65: Don Turcotte, D
  • 1966–67: Don Turcotte, D
  • 1967–68: Ken Leu, G
  • 1969–70: Dave Poile, F


Hockey East

Individual awards

All-Conference teams

First Team All-Hockey East

Second Team All-Hockey East

Third Team All-Hockey East

Hockey East All-Rookie Team

Northeastern Huskies Hall of Fame

The following is a list of people associated with the Northeastern men's ice hockey program who were elected into the Northeastern Huskies Hall of Fame (induction date in parenthesis).[8]

Huskies in the NHL[9]

= NHL All-Star Team = NHL All-Star[10] = NHL All-Star[10] and NHL All-Star Team = Hall of Famers

See also

References

  1. ^ "Northeastern Athletics Logo Sheet". August 13, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  2. ^ http://www.uscho.com/m/northeastern-huskies/mens-college-hockey/team,nu.html
  3. ^ a b "Northeastern Huskies men's Hockey 2018-19 Media Guide" (PDF). Northeastern Huskies. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  4. ^ "2019–20 Men's Ice Hockey Roster". Northeastern Huskies. Retrieved January 20, 2020.
  5. ^ "Team Records". New Hampshire Wildcats. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  6. ^ "Legends of Hockey". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  7. ^ "United States Hockey Hall of Fame". Hockey Central.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  8. ^ "Huskies Hall of Fame". Northeastern Huskies. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  9. ^ "Alumni report for Northeastern University". Hockey DB. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Players are identified as an All-Star if they were selected for the All-Star game at any time in their career.

External links

This page was last edited on 20 January 2020, at 18:03
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