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Nightingales (American TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nightingales
GenreMedical drama
Written by
Starring
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes13
Production
Executive producer(s)
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)Aaron Spelling Productions
Release
Original networkNBC
Original releaseJanuary 21 (1989-01-21) –
April 26, 1989 (1989-04-26)

Nightingales is an American medical drama television series that aired on NBC from January 21, 1989 to April 26, 1989.[1] It was produced by Aaron Spelling Productions.

Premise

The series follows the stories of Christine Broderick, a supervisor of student nurses, portrayed by Suzanne Pleshette, and her five nursing students: Sam (Chelsea Field), Bridget (Susan Walters), Yolanda (Roxann Dawson), Becky (Kristy Swanson), and Allyson (Kim Johnston Ulrich). Other hospital personnel include Christine's love interest, Dr. Paul Petrillo (Gil Gerard); the head nurse, Lenore Ritt (Fran Bennett); and the chief of staff, Dr. Garrett Braden (Barry Newman). Sam also has a daughter, Megan (Taylor Fry).

Production

The series was developed from a pilot television movie, also titled Nightingales, that was directed by Mimi Leder and originally aired in June 1988. Field, Walters, Swanson, Bennett, and Jennifer Rhodes (as Effie Gardner) are the only members of the cast to appear in both the film and the series.[2]

Reception

The series was described in the Chicago Tribune as portraying nursing students as women who "don't spend much time studying...[but] do hang around in their underwear a lot".[3] Nightingales was criticized for "demeaning the nursing profession...by portraying five student nurses as lusty bimbos", and the American Nurses Association initiated a letter-writing campaign that prompted several of the show's sponsors to withdraw their advertising.[4] The series was cancelled after 13 episodes. Aaron Spelling briefly revived it in syndication as the 1995 series University Hospital.

References

  1. ^ Brooks & Marsh 2003, p. 859.
  2. ^ "Nightingales". Turner Classic Movies. Atlanta: Turner Broadcasting System (Time Warner). Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  3. ^ "Sour Notes On 'Nightingales'". Chicago Tribune. March 16, 1989. Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  4. ^ Superville, Darlene E. (May 2, 1989). "Suzanne Pleshette Meets Nurses, Asks Them to Help Save "Nightingales"". Associated Press. Retrieved January 10, 2013.

Sources

External links

This page was last edited on 7 July 2020, at 16:21
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